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"Es una gran pérdida para el pueblo Argentino."

Translation:It is a great loss for the Argentinian people.

5 years ago

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JimVahl

I don't quite know where to comment on this, but this multiple choice is a good example. We are learning abstract concepts, but the three choices vary so greatly (only one has the word Argentine) that it is extremely easy to guess the correct choice without needing to know anything about the abstract concept vocabulary. Duo should try to present possible translations which vary in the area which we are learning, not in peripheral words which really don't have anything to do with the lesson. This happens very frequently with these multiple choice lessons.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Beez
Dr.Beez
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It would be nice to have more control over what kinds of problems are presented. Perhaps this could be done with checkboxes in the options. Sometimes I really want to focus on the listening exercises, for example.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan4090
Ryan4090
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I agree on that

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I wish the multiple choice were more challenging too, Jim.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/axl.c

I am fine with the way it is. Most studies show that when you have to choose between subtle differences in multiple choices answers and you fail, you may get confused later about which answer was the right one.

It is better that the right answer be obvious, so that you answer it quickly with confidence and it gets impressed in your mind.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benpdo
benpdo
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Another opportunity along these lines is to move away from providing distractor/s (wrong answer choices) which differ from the correct answer by one letter, e.g., 1) blah blah blah el cangrejo and 2) blah blah bllah el cangrejo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/momaguiar

No, I think these one letter option differences make us really look at the options; sometimes it is a difference in gender, or verb tense, or singular/plural. I like them. They make us think.....

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindPradhan

Most of the multiple choice questions in DL are not well-thought at all. The correct answer stands out as the only one having the focal word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hungover
hungover
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No llores por mí Argentina.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

♪ Mi alma está contigo ♫

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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Here is a lingo for you! you shouldn't cry @Hungover :'(

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah-

This is the first time pueblo has been used to mean people. I don't think that's right. Pueblo means town, doesn't it? I can't find anything online that indicates this meaning. I'm reporting it, but if someone knows any different, I'd like to be corrected.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dougconnah

The Ascendo free app for Spanish translates the word "pueblo" as "village; city; town; people; populace" and specifically as "people, populace" in connection with the noun "país," which I take to mean with nouns of countries.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah-

Thanks, you and Talca both. I actually ended up looking a bit harder, which is what I should have done before I left a comment. It helps to know that it is used in connection with "pais."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DebWeber
DebWeber
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thanks. sometimes I think I learn more from getting an answer wrong and then looking at the comments, especially when they are like this one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Dictionary definition #1 town #2 people. The #2 definition is not uncommon.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

It seems to me that this sentence can be translated both ways: "It is a great loss for the Argentine town/village" and "It is a great loss for the Argentine people".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeniaAT
EugeniaAT
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I disagree. There's not an argentine village or town, only a country. In this case, the sentence is probably refering to the population, so the closest translation would be "the argentine people". I'm argentinian, by the way. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/enn.in.me
enn.in.me
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There are many Argentine towns. Just like there are many French towns and American towns. There may not be a town called Argentina.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeniaAT
EugeniaAT
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Ohhh you mean that "Argentine" is an adjective here? Yup, that could be right.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenWende1

Duo accepted village from me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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In Spanish it is correct to say "el pueblo argentino", "el pueblo español" meaning all the people of a country.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laemagno

Shouldn't 'argentino' be all in small letters?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyDC65

No, it should be capitalized. Nationalities are capitalized in English (just like languages).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M132T003C
M132T003C
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The question was (presumably) about the Spanish sentence, not the English one. Nationality adjectives aren’t usually capitalized in Spanish, but this one is in this sentence for some reason. I suspect it is a mistake.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeniaAT
EugeniaAT
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Yes, it's a mistake. It shouldn't be capitalized in spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jondav1963

Very topical given last nights world cup final result.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeniaAT
EugeniaAT
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Yea, but we're still happy, actually. We did make it to the final after all and we gave them a run for their money before that goal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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Confused. para can mean To or For. Both are in the responses. Also Perdida earlier meant waste or loss. Both in responses. Took a stab and down goes another heart

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

I agree. And "es" could mean "he/she is". Surely, this can be translated (for example):

"He is a great loss to the Argentian people."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/easy56

I have a hard time was the voice synthesizer. Perhaps when I become more proficient is Spanish I will automatically know that when she says "en" she really means "el".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wbt
wbt
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Why is "large" not accepted where "big" and "great" both are?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FraserMcFadyen

I'd say "a great loss to".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khanog

Argentina so happened to lose the world cup. The irony!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rodiraskol

I translated 'pueblo' as 'community' and got it wrong, but it seems like that's the concept that is being expressed here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenG801318

Perhaps my computer speakers, but the enunciation of "perdido" sounds so much like Vs where the Ds are, (pervivo) which isn't a word I used, so I figured it out ok. I am wondering if this is representative of correct pronunciation. Should I be speaking my Ds like Vs, or is this an anomaly or a specific accent?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billmoose
billmoose
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Headphones and a quiet room help. I'm guilty of not doing either since I have on a Mexican radio station, and the parrot is chattering at the moment.

But yes, the accent is correct. There is a convergence of the V and the B sound in Spanish and the computer voice is imperfect. The D can be "close" just for added "amusement".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

I agree. Some of the "units" in DL are also so simplistic that they're nearly useless. There are twenty parts to each unit and nearly all of the 20 parts of this unit were about "compromiso," "identidad" or how some chica didn't act well at a party. Sometimes I get the feeling DL is less focused on teaching Spanish to the general public and much more focused on identifying people who can help the company make money by translating documents, Web pages, etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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And if I say "for the Argentinian"..., why it's not accepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mennjai
Mennjai
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Not so! Consider the 2014 World Cup! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrancoGiob
FrancoGiob
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Vamos Argentina carajoooo!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeAnneHill

pueblo means people? I thought it mean village or town

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyDC65

It can mean both in the same way town and village can be used to mean people in English.

For example:

The entire town/village is talking about it!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skisquash

typed the same thing with no caps. they said it was wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sue301667

Why is gran used with the feminine una perdida?

1 year ago