Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"He oído que tienes una nueva novia."

Translation:I have heard that you have a new girlfriend.

5 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kturowski
kturowski
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12

Why is "nueva" before "novia"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
  • 25
  • 14
  • 3
  • 2036

I think in one position it means "brand spanking new", fresh off the assembly line new and in the other position it means "new to me". I assume it means "new to me" here.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

This the fourth time in one day that I have seen nueva appear before a noun. I have no idea about rules, exceptions et al, but I plan on putting it in front of any nouns I want to. Es mi nueva idea.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Piotrek3201
Piotrek3201
  • 15
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5

Some example I learned in the French course:

Él tiene un coche nuevo - He has a brand new car. "new" is an attribute.

Él tiene un nuevo coche - It can be a used car, but new to him.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truelefty
truelefty
  • 25
  • 24
  • 24
  • 18
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 220

Nueva can go after or before, it is the same

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackTreber

hey hey you you I don't like your girlfriend!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BBroxi
BBroxi
  • 16
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

I'm using a picture of Adelle to remember this sentence. Maybe she'll release a spanish album

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robian64
Robian64
  • 21
  • 15
  • 10
  • 3
  • 2
  • 93

Ouch!!! My question is if the x-girlfriend is asking this lol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GringoUruguayo

Why is "I heard" not equivalent to "I have heard"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

Generally, the present perfect tense (Yo he oído - I have heard) describes an action that started in the past and continues in the present.
The simple past tense (Yo oí - I heard) describes an action that was completed in the past.

So for your examples:
Yo oí - I heard (I heard it once in the past)
Yo he oído - I have heard (I heard it in the past, and I keep hearing about it)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleFenorme

Duo sounds jealous.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shann472262

If oir is already conjugated to oido then why is tener conjugated as well? I thought that any verbs following another were to stay in their basic form. Is this just an exception?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
  • 22
  • 20
  • 16
  • 38

Oído is a participle, not a conjugation. Haber is conjugated to he before it, and tener is in a relative clause.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jlkr77

I could barely understand she was saying oido. SMH

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gaylesbean

I left out the word "that" and was marked wrong :( imo it should still be counted as correct that way tho, in english there's no functional difference between "I have heard..." and "I have heard that..."

2 months ago