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  5. "Das Publikum mag den Schweiz…

"Das Publikum mag den Schweizer."

Translation:The audience likes the Swiss man.

July 15, 2013

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lieryan

Does this sentence mean that "the public likes Swiss people (in general)" or that "the public likes a certain person that comes from Swiss"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dnovinc

The latter.

the verb "mögen" (mag) requires an accusative object. Since it is accusative case we just have to look up http://www.canoo.net/inflection/schweizer:N:M and see that "den Schweizer" is singular noun in acc case meaning "the Swiss (person)".

"The public likes the Swiss (plural)" would be "Das Publikum mag die Schweizer."

Since I am not a native English speaker that which you've written confused me: ".... a certain person that comes from Swiss". Can we really substitute "Switzerland" with "Swiss" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

No, you can't substitute Switzerland with Swiss. And I would not normally say Swiss to mean a Swiss man or woman - I would include man, woman or person. Same as you would not say a French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyBlakem

Duo accepted "the audience likes the swiss" but it is probably wrong because it means the swiss in general and not one person . First time I am complaining about Duo marking me correct!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarlEisenhofer

Whether "The audience likes the Swiss" refers to a singular person or a group of people from Switzerland or all the people of the nation is entirely context depedant. So Duo is correct to accept it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahmedltf

Naturlich, alle mogen Roger Federer: Der Tennis-Sensation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyBlakem

Remember that Roger is half South African!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dharma50

Not at all. His mothers is from South Africa. That does not make him half South African. He is born in Basel, in Switzerland.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nejmeddine1

Sie sprechen worüber Roger Federer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarinaVlad4

Your sentence is wrong. Sie sprechen ÜBER Roger Federer. Best regards


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pifta

I peeked Publikum. It wrote crowd. I wrote crowd. Program says it's wrong. ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Levi
  • 2401

@Pifta : Generally the first word in the hints is the best. The sentence using the word 'crowd' is currently rejected because it hasn't been programmed into Duolingo yet. I think 'The crowd likes the Swiss.' would be acceptable. Did you report it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pifta

This was 3 years ago, who remembers?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marsi934447

like or likes.. why are both correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The_iCONer

Using "likes" after a singular collective noun is American English, whereas using just "like" after a singular collective noun is British English. I have, however, never seen German use any verb ending with "-en" after a singular collective noun, so I presume that there is only one correct answer in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

I don't know the grammatical reason - maybe something to do with audience being a collective noun. But they certainly both sound right to this native English speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chives1cl

Audience in English is singular so it should be "the audience likes," but the people (plural) in the audience like.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Corey_prince

Much be watching Tennis ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicholas_F

Why does Publikum use "mag?" Isn't that supposed to be first person singular? Shouldn't Publikum use "magt?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tawnyfrogmouth

Das Publikum is singular - replace it with the pronoun ' it' and you see that you need to use mag

ie he/she/it = mag


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisBoyd10

I tried "Swiss guy" and it was not accepted. Also, how would you say "Swiss woman" instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zacwill

You just add '-in' to make a feminine form. A female Schweizer is a Schweizerin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pigslew

Reported February 2018.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yaqootassaf

It now accepts "guy", too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mary714801

I tried Swiss guy too, it corrected me to 'man'. Well, i didn't know 'guy' and 'man' were not the SAME EXACT THING, which they are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

"guy" is too informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlCampbe7

Didn't like gentleman either. If the nationality were almost anything but Swiss this could sound politically incorrect ( horror of horrors ).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yaqootassaf

I don't really think the word "Schweizer" is that formal. I think it just means "swiss" in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KathrynBon5

I looked up the translation of "Schweizer", and its used to refer to a Swiss man AND/OR a Swiss woman. Swiss Woman would actually also be "Schweizer Frau". Says nothing about using "Schweizerin".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeNesbitt1462

I hate this guy, his accent is so imprecise, I cant tell if he is saying Schweize or Schweizer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BLRT2000

What if it was feminine? Schweizerin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seuny

Den or die. I just got it wrong for not including the word man. Is den not plural. The audience like the swiss in general or we picking on one of the actors who is swiss?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah851648

This sentence means that the audience likes one specific Swiss guy. If you wanted to say the Swiss in general that would be: "Das Publikum mag die Schweizer."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NBridgeman2

how would the sentence look if we were saying a swiss woman instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConnorArmo

Swiss cheese came from Switzerland


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Silao__

Why den and not der?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleHill142978

How would one say 'The audience likes the Swiss woman'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabihghandour

What kind of non sense Examples are these.?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deboutwest

Swede = Swiss, ja?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

Definitely not! Swedes live in Sweden, Swiss people live in Switzerland. Swedes are also vegetables, but let's not confuse things ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deficere2

Lol, as a swede, I didn't know swede was english for kålrot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mary714801

I translated it as 'the audience likes the Swiss guy'. It said I was wrong; that 'guy' is not the EXACT SAME as 'man'. It IS the same thing. Guy, man whatever. Weirdos @ duolingo. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

No, it is not exactly the same. It is quite a bit less formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ololo-518

Could you use "Switzerman"?

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