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"La primavera está en el aire."

Translation:Spring is in the air.

5 years ago

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

I know it is the literal translation but native english speakers would not say "The" spring is in the air, we would say "Spring is in the air."...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Both are accepted on duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

I know, I'm just saying that even though DL accepts it, it would never be said in english that way...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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You're right. I'm glad there are no only the sentences, but this forum also exists.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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I know it's an English saying, but is it a Spanish saying too?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elder169244

I have lived in Mexico for almost a year and a half. I have never heard anyone say that phrase. However I asked a native speaking friend and he said that they don't say it but they understand it

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

Right - I've told them 15/1/15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucky101man

DL is annoying when it comes to articles like this.

I actually wrote 'The spring is in the air' disliking it as a translation but being more sure that DL would accept it.

To me 'The spring is in the air' changes the context completely from spring the season to meaning the spring, as in the metal coil.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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Duo accepts both and I suspect there were people who wrote that their translation should have been accepted. To me, it doesn't matter because I just want to know how to say it in Spanish.

In Spanish, when a noun starts the sentence and is the subject, usually always has a definite article, which we don't translate into English. But, not every time though, as it would normally be uncounted singular such has water, beer etc.

I know what you mean, because you know how to translate it correctly, as it does change the meaning to a spring or a coil. So, I can see where one would be annoyed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanHill0

Thanks for your comment! It explains why I've had a problem with some of those definite articles! Also, I had learned, some time back, that 'espanol' (as a language being spoken, was always preceded by the definite article....as in 'Yo hablo EL espanol'. Is that, or WAS that (ever) true?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elPofero

No, not true. I can say 'yo tengo hambre' and not el hambre. Similarly, el español can be presented without the form: yo hablo español.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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And the "Yo" isn't necessary either, so you are more likely to hear "Tengo hambre" and "Hablo español".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

See this website: http://www.bowdoin.edu/~eyepes/newgr/ats/08a10.htm

Also see this: http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/5

"1) Use "el/la" before languages, fields of knowledge, sports, nouns in a general sense." 2) Use before titles of people 3) before days of the week. 4) Parts of body, and clothing.

Exception: Don't use "el/la" with languages when they are objects/ complements of the verb.

However, DL doesn't seem to follow the rules presented in these two websites. It seems that, whenever I follow these rules, I get marked wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jsado
jsado
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It's true for noun. The definite article must be present before a noun.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnBurley
JohnBurleyPlus
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Strongly agree!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K1MJONGUNations

using 'the spring' would make it sound like it was mid-bounce

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liakada316
Liakada316
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The translation was not THE spring was in the air. The La was not used for some reason. And if you can see where it tells you the translation it says Spring is in the air.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cesar953686

in Spanish we always use the articles before a noun

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/howcheng
howcheng
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"Omg my pen exploded! The spring is in the air!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deibiddoji
deibiddoji
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Yes, that fits much better. Tnx for the humor.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

what IS the spanish word for (metal) spring?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

According to WordReference, it's either resorte or muelle

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

Oh ok, great. Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

SpanishDict.com agrees: "el muelle" or "el resorte" = metal spring

Tambien, "to spring into the air" = saltar (v) or el salto (n). ; Think "somerSAuLT" (somersault)

Spring of water = el manantial

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshTay

I swear she is saying ayde, or "eye-day" not aire.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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an "r" between two vowels turns into a "flapped" d sound, as in English bladder or auto or butter. I had this pointed out to me by one of my Spanish speaking students who heard the similarity between the t in Auto (as in the Auto Zone stores here) and the r in pero. It therefore sounds like a d or a t to English speakers, because that is when we hear that particular sound.

Unlike the "d" sound in Spanish, which turns into a "th" between two vowels, and at the end of words, so verdad sounds more like vethath. (voiced th, as in then) At least in Northern Mexico. Confused enough? 02-22-14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

Thank you for this post!!! Very helpful!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConfusedSquid

Gracias

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Only some varieties of English, mind. For instance, being Irish, the Spanish 'r' is definitely an 'r' and not an intervocalic 'd' or 't' sound. Typically an alveolar flap is considered a rhotic sound.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

Thanks for the helpful comment.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/james.ray1
james.ray1
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I have been very confused by this same pronunciation, so thanks for the explanation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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To make that D sound, a Mexican woman told me yesterday to put my tongue between my teeth. At least I have absolutely no trouble rrrrrrrrolling my rrrrrrrrs.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

she is rolling the 'r'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshTay

I thought the r's got rolled when there were two of them. Like perro and arroz.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

they get rolled a little when there is one, a lot when there are two. Some accents more than others. I have heard native speakers sound pretty much like the computer voice when saying 'aire'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshTay

Thanks for the explanation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

If I find a spanish word with three "R"s I'm in trouble. I can't roll 2 "R"s :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Jesse, here's a way to practice rolling your "r"s: try to copy the sound a cat makes when purring! ;-) Pur-r-r-r!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/potter291

Sounds like ayde to me to , i cannot hear the letter r

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caerdydd

I'd swear to that to!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LEGEND
LEGEND
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El amor tambien esta en el aire

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

¿Dónde? Quiero estar allí.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HocaCateran

This can be also use in Spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshWhitaker

Deseo esto fue cierto. Ahora es muy frio aqui.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Izabela_K
Izabela_K
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It figures I would first meet this sentence on the first day of spring here. And it's snowing. I feel so lied to.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmat10
jmat10
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Anyone remeber the song by that name in the 70's - makes me want to dance the merengue!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmat10
jmat10
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Oops! I think the song was actually Love is in the Air

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jallenq
jallenq
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Can anyone explain to me why aire sounds like aeday? There's no D's in it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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the r in aire is a single tapped sound - a quick tap against the ridge in back of your teeth, which is totally unlike the English r, which is pronounced with the tip of the tongue against the bottom teeth and can be prolonged like a vowel. Think of it as one roll in a rolled r. The sound is actually almost identical to the sound in auto, when said quicky, ;little, litter, ladder, and latter (which sound the same unless said carefully. The sound is actually voiced because it is surrounded by vowels, , and closer to a d than a t) D and T at the beginning of words in English are said with the tip of the tongue a little farther up on the ridge.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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That's an excellent and detailed explanation klg, but quite specific to your regional pronunciation. I'm from the north of England and I can't say r with the tip of my tongue against my bottom teeth without choking!
I would say that the speaker can't roll her R's to save herself.

Talking of cute R's (pun entirely appropriate!), years ago my New Yorker girlfriend asked me:
"What are these squiddles that you keep talking about?"
I explained.
"Oh", she said, "you mean squirls!"
Of course we both thought we were saying squirrels.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Cute story - and very germane.
I speak a sort of standard MidWestern American English, so ---
The pronunciation of r's and vowels are two of the strongest dialect pronunciation markers in English, from the r that sounds like an AAH in the speech of people from Boston to what I perceive as a rolled R in Scots ( and Northern England) speech. It's been years since I worked with the IPA, so I'm not sure what symbols would be used, but I bet an exact transcription would show different symbols for our pronunciations.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I'm sorry to see that there isn't yet a computer-based audio to IPA translator - at least not open-source. I'm not surprised. I lost quite a few brain cells trying to teach myself IPA!
However, do you know if there is any way to attach a short audio file to our messages here on these discussion pages?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/howcheng
howcheng
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Coincidentally, the "r" in Japanese is also the same sound, except you don't get the rolling "r" that you have in Spanish. Japanese also doesn't have the "l" phoneme; in fact, they use the "r" for "l", which is how you end up with "Engrish".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Sara-Soda_

wow, finally a sentence i can actually use in the real world, thx doulingo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AveryThornton

can't it be spring is in the air?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivy657
Ivy657
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Yay

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariebarke

does anyone else here aire pronounced with a d as in aide?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AgathaSmith13

did it sound like it said la aire to anyone else?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanSchre1

How do you pronoune aire? My recording makes it sound like there is a "d" in the word

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrislo27

El ah-ee-reh

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoNoHablaEspanol

Texes didn't get the memo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Muyil
Muyil
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I hear 'eye-day' for 'aire'. Does anybody know where that pronunciation is used?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cecioce89
cecioce89
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Damn pollen

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gordonjackson1

Why is "la" required before primavera? It is subjective.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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"Love is in the air". A Spanish rhyme: "La primavera ha venido y nadie sabe como ha sido".

8 months ago