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"Tá cónaí uirthi san Astráil thoir."

Translation:She lives in east Australia.

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KateGorvel

As an Australian I have to say you would not say eastern Australia. You would only say in the east of Australia.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John365571

As an Australian I would say you are lost. The East of Australia has 4 states. Would you say East America? or East Europe? Not saying the Irish is wrong but the English is weird

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

We don't say "East America", but we do say "North America" and "South America", and we used to say "West Germany" and "East Germany". Cities and towns are often qualified this way (South Dublin, East London).

From KateGorvel's comment, this question might originally have preferred "eastern Australia", but for some reason Australians don't like that ("Western Australia" is a single state, but the terms "Northern Australia" and "Southern Australia" are both used, and warrant their own Wikipedia entries). So the terms "Eastern Australia" and "east Australia" might sound out of place to an Australian, but not to someone on the far side of the world who is telling his neighbour where his daughter is living these days.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alice54_Maree3.

I'm an Australian and I have no objections to Eastern Australia and I live on the Eastern side of Australia

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rev._mother

You’re getting proper names mixed up with descriptions of locations. We DO say “the east of America” or “eastern America”, though they are not proper names.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackmchugh12

what the difference between Astráil thoir and 'Oirthear na hAstráile' (not sure of genitive of australia)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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I’d see Astráil thoir as “eastern Australia”, and Oirthear na hAstráile as “the East of Australia” — more a difference in form than in meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rostellan
Rostellan
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One of the 'correct' translations given is, ' She has living in eastern Australia'. This is not English as I know it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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It is English to me, actually the translation I would think was best.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
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'has living' is a good translation? Where are you from that that's correct?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Arrgh! First I get a sentence where she pronounces Tá cónaí orthu as tá cónaí ort, and now I get a sentence where she pronounces Tá cónaí uirthi like tá cónaí orthu.

Even if orthu and uirthi are barely distinguishable in Connaght Irish, they are distinguishable in both Ulster Irish and Munster Irish, and learners should be allowed to hear that distinction!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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I have seen this several times now and just can't leave it alone. Someone explain please, "Tá cónaí uirthi" and what it means literally please. I just can't remember and want to know how we get "She lives" from that. I don't remember seeing it used this way but I can't remember how it actually was used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

The dictionary definition of cónaí is "dwelling, residence".

Like "hunger" (tá ocras orm) and "thirst" (tá tart ort) , "residence" or "dwelling" is a state that can be "on" a person - tá cónaí orm sa sráidbhaile - "I am residing in the village", "I am in residence in the village", "I reside in the village", "I dwell in the village", "I live in the village", etc.

(For the sake of simplicity, Duolingo sticks with "live", because that's the most common way to say it in English).

1 year ago