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  5. "Vi har drygt tre veckor på o…

"Vi har drygt tre veckor oss."

Translation:We have slightly more than three weeks.

December 14, 2014

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timothymckeon

can anyone clarify what this means? the english solution is a little awkward/ambiguous. thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anders91

We have slightly more than three weeks [to do X].

På oss basically means that we're dealing with some kind of deadline.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrazyChao

So, would Vi har drygt tre veckor på oss att göra det (We have slightly more than three weeks to do it) be correct in Swedish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anders91

That is correct. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timothymckeon

great - thank you! maybe "we have slightly more than three weeks left" would be a good alternative translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anders91

Yes and no. If you add left to the English sentence, we would add kvar att the end of the Swedish one. This one of those cases where you are going to lose some information in translation.

In this case, the comments section is a great complement to the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

complement :^}


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sjodni

So, the translation is more inferred in Swedish, than in english, where it just plain out doesn't make sense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PJamesM

The English makes perfect sense. "When do we have to get this done by?" "We have slightly more than three weeks." You could add something like "left" or "remaining" or "to complete the task" to the end of the sentence, but even without it, it's still implicit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anders91

I guess you could say that yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/podgorsk

I assume that a bit more than and just over would be also good translations for drygt and to my ear a bit less:) awkward in English. I wonder if there is a special word for `a bit less than' in Swedish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

I also assume those are accepted.

The opposite, "a bit less than", is knappt!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/podgorsk

Thanks. Very convenient words I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Very, actually. They're both really common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/podgorsk

Somehow, Duolingo seems to be biased toward presenting drygt rather than knappt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

I think that might be because dryg also features with another meaning, so Duolingo thinks it's more common. It could also be that you've made a few more errors on such sentences so that the system has decided you need to practice those more. Or any of a few other reasons, hard to say for sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hbroo

An interesting note is that some native speakers use the word "drygt" when what they really mean is "approximately". The true meaning is "slightly more than" and it can never be exactly as much as or less than.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anders91

I wouldn't say there is such a thing as a "true" meaning. Languages are not carved in stone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TurnipNacho

is there an equivalent word for "slightly less than" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, knappt. It works the same way grammatically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pau_duolingo

på oss -> ahead of us wouldn't be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

That would be framför oss.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobi32

Before us, then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, that too. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bilbo123Baggins

Couldn't it be 'We have at least three weeks´?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

No, "at least" would translate to "åtminstone"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/desifromitaly

Vi har drygt tre veckor på oss = vi har drygt tre veckor kvar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Mostly no: ... på oss means that you have a deadline, but ... kvar just means that there's three weeks left of something


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nacreousnereid

The "correct" solution I got was "We have a good three weeks." Um, what?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Sounds good to me. The default is "We have slightly more than three weeks", though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

nacreousnarid, compare the following:
He weighs a good 200 pounds = He weighs at least 200 pounds, and possibly a bit more


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sushovan7

We have slightly more than three weeks with us - acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

No, "with us" doesn't really work in English here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jwbards

I wold say to us does, though, although it wouldn't be particularly common. Can't decide whether to report it or not ... ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Honestly, I'm not sure. I'd have been prepared to say it's not grammatical until you told me it is. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jwbards

The problem is that I start second guessing myself. Now I don't know whether I'd actually ever say it or not - although I think it's fine grammatically. Is på oss necessary in the Swedish sentence? Anders91 says above that it implies some sort of deadline. Is that not true without it? If it is, then I would be inclined NOT to report it, because it certainly isn't necessary in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's definitely mandatory. If you leave it out, the sentence is still grammatical but it makes less sense. I can see people leave it out colloquially, or if another phrase supercedes it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/podgorsk

We have got slightly more than three weeks. To me it emphasizes better the deadline part.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

That absolutely works. We usually accept "got" everywhere in similar situations, but it was apparently missing here. I've added it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/historicbruno

I don't fully understand the use of "på oss" here, and can't find any sources about it. Is it another definition of "ha på sig" (to wear), or entirely separate from the verb? Is it valid with other subjects: "Jag har drygt tre veckor på mig"? Other comments suggest it has to do with deadlines, so I guess it always needs to follow a time expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, exactly - it means "the amount of time you have prior to a deadline", basically. So it's like in the Queen song:

Flash, I love you, but we only have fourteen hours to save the Earth!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Segwyne

The first time I encountered this, I was racking my brain trying to remember what garment was called veckor to find out what they were wearing.


[deactivated user]

    What? I though "drygt" meant "approximately".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    A small percentage of the population does use it like that, but the overwhelming majority uses the traditional meaning of "slightly more than".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattBush2

    It's not a direct translation, but would We have just over three weeks left convey the same meaning?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    Often, yes, though it does have the direct equivalent ... veckor kvar.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukaZwaan

    So how would you say "We have just over three weeks to ourselves" in Swedish?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    Vi har drygt tre veckor för oss själva.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianClift1

    I think this should be allowed: we have just over three weeks left


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    Please refer to Anders91's above comment on that.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juan49481

    Confusing sentence fragment because we don't know what is being referred to


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimNolt

    Would/Could if ever be said without the "pä oss?" Vi har drygt tre veckor. Perhaps in response to, "Hur mycket tid har vi för att avsluta jobbet?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    Yes, absolutely.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Egbert-NL

    Is 'pa oss' a necessary addition? It isn't translated


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    Yes, it's a very idiomatic Swedish construction.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doveres

    Should "We have a little more than weeks" be an acceptable answer?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    The construction is fine, but you're missing the "three". :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doveres

    Ha! I've been housebound too long. LOL


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RainIsHere

    why did we use "på oss" in this sentence?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    Please see the top-level comment chain.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim_Erlandsson

    "We have approximately tree weeks on our hands." should be treated as a correct answer, since, even though "drygt" means slightly more than in most cases, it can still be used as "slightly less- or more than".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    It's used to mean "approximately" by a minority of Swedes, but this minority is small enough that it's generally a bad idea to teach this meaning.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brevskrivning

    So what's wrong with 'We have just over three weeks left'. Picky, picky.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarvelMani1

    to me (Canadian native English speaker), adding the "left" indicates the timespan has already begun and the three weeks refers to the remaining time.

    But "We have just over (slightly more than) three weeks" on its own can also be used before the activity has even begun, just to indicate the amount of time allocated for the entire activity.

    So adding the "left" to the translation adds a nuance that is not indicated in the original.

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