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"No lo necesito."

Translation:I do not need it.

5 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/senathesquid

Spongebob said this in that episode where was resisting the glass of water and it's all I can think of when I hear this sentence now

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Trash

YES! That's exactly what I thought of!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kiraya04

I Neeeed It!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lshadgett
Lshadgett
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Why not "I don't need him"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arturopadi

That's correct too, I don't need it or i dont need him, depending on what you are referring

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KIluI2

That does notsound right

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyanHaining

I NEEEEED IT

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CherylW.3
CherylW.3
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Why not, "It isn't necessary?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Penguage

That would actually translate to "No es necesario," which of course, doesn't have a direct object pronoun.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shinthus

I don't need it.....I definitely don't need it........

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackbandanas

Why can't it be I don't need her?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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That would be "No la necesito." Lo is masculine.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/57flora

So what does no necisito mean w/o lo?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JUSTlNCASE

I dont need

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pandyants

Still confused as to why "No necesito" can't be said? Would that be like saying "no need it" or "don't need it" in english?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackbandanas

No necesito means "I don't need." In order to make it "I don't need it" you need the lo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/artoriuz25

I wrote "I do not need you" in place of "No lo necesito" and i had it correct.

So does it means 'lo' could be "it, him or you"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Lo is also the object form of usted, so it can be translated as the formal "you".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andywal51

Wny put need in translation when the answer is want make up your mind more demoralisations As a beginner the use of want and need is actually the same, the fine tuning of ability can come later, labouring of similar words only confuses

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShanzidaHaque

Is le, la, and lo all for he/she/it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Lo is for "him" and masculine nouns, la is for "her" and feminine nouns. These two are used as direct objects.

Le is for any gender and is used as indirect object. (So things you'd usually translate as "to it" or "for it" in English.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel930574

Why "no es necesito" is incorrect?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AkiaSim

should '' it is not necessary'' be accepted

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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No, besides making a completely different grammar here, the "me" part is missing. -I- don't need it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AksBond

to mean 'I do not need him', should i say ' No lo necesito a él'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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If there's good context, you can go with "No lo necesito." Else you can say "No necesito a él." There's no need to use both pronouns.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmazingGuy2

It doesn't accept "i dont need it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kim613480
Kim613480
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How would you say, "No, I need it"?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"No, lo necesito."

The comma is all the rage. :)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LatrellCas

It was correct

9 months ago