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"Él me dio con el codo."

Translation:He hit me with his elbow.

5 years ago

108 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gregers212
gregers212
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You could also literally translate it into English: "He gave me the elbow", and it would make sense, but it counted it wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I have heard of giving someone the finger, but never the elbow. Of course we do use it as a verb as well. He elbowed me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aumbria

Ow?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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DL accepts "He elbowed me."

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilyJRobinson

That's not an accurate literal translation. The verb "con" means with, so for it to be literal you would need to translate it as "He gave me with the elbow," which makes no sense in English.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/speedier

Yes, and that was 4 years ago, and they still haven't accepted it. To give someone the elbow is almost the same in British English as in Spanish. To be fair though, I'm getting messages almost daily saying that they have accepted some phrase or other I suggested years ago, so things are looking up.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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While it is true that to give someone the elbow is the same in British and American English, it is NOT the same in Spanish. To express the idea expressed in English by he gave me the elbow, the correct Spanish phrase would be Él me dio un CODAZO. When suggesting an answer in English you must always be sure that it is indeed what the Spanish sentence means. Here, it is not.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/He%20elbowed%20me

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Codazo%20

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wmunnell

In English we say "elbowed me", not "hit me with his/lher elbow".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dawithers

Both are fine. The first thing I thought of was the latter although the former is used very commonly.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hungover
hungover
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Not true. Elbowing means to push someone aside using your elbow. Perhaps in this context, he merely hit me with his elbow.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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Yes, elbowing means to push someone aside using the elbow(s), as in elbowing your way through a crowd; but it also means the simple act of striking someone with your elbow or even jostling them in a the ribs in a playful manner. Google either word "jostling" or "elbowing," which is given as to "strike (someone) with one's elbow," example: "one player had elbowed another in the face." Also, "elbowing" is both a practice and a violation in certain combative sports.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elbow_%28strike%29

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hungover
hungover
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Yeah, it carries some connotations with it, though. I was just pointing out both are absolutely acceptable, and it's silly to simply say one isn't used (which is what the original comment said).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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Agreed.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrew721506

For the "jostling them in the ribs in a playful manor" part, i thought that was 'ribbing'. Good natured ribbing being a phrase which usually refers the the verbal teasing that might lead up to such a physical action.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Well this whole discussion is interesting, but doesn't related to this Spanish sentence at all. To elbow somebody, either when elbowing through a crowd or to nudge or poke someone with your elbow, is expressed in Spanish by the expression Él me dio un codazo.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Codazo

I never really thought of whether to run somebody was related to this action. It might be, or may simply refer to the ribs because that is a classic place to tickle someone which is another type of teasing. Since that's even more of a slang expression, I don't know how translatable it is into Spanish. But to be honest I am not quite sure what connotations this sentence may or may not have. I think golear would be more common for an actual hit, whether or not it was intentional. But it may well be regional.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/juana597644

As a school administrator many students told me, " He hit me with his elbow, arm, knee, head - pick a body part.". Usually this would be the beginning of a fight . ... Good times.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Obedgilles
Obedgilles
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Ah, ah ! I know what you are talking about.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneZahra

True. That is the preferred translation and it was marked wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAwesomeClair

"He elbowed me" was accepted 2/16/17 And I agree with this translation, being hit with someone's elbow is generally called being elbowed in nearly any circumstance

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KerrieSalsac
KerrieSalsac
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Shouldn't it be: "Él me dio con SU codo." Why is it el here instead of su? It has me all confused.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demsw

With body parts, the definite article is used instead of the possessive pronoun. Not sure why - I just know it comes up elsewhere.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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We use articles with more than just body parts. Spanish has two types of possession that English doesn't have and those two cases allow us to use articles with certain nouns, sometimes in conjunction with certain verbs, those cases are the inalienable possession and the dative possessive.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gibbett
gibbett
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It's the same in Italian.

Even though it seems a bit unusual to us, this construct works because it's obvious from the context(and also the limits of human flexibility) who's body part is being referenced.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KerrieSalsac
KerrieSalsac
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Good to know why :) Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MercilessM

it should be "él me dió UN GOLPE con el codo".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Based on the comments, it seems like "he gave me the elbow" is something that people say. I've never heard it this way, and didn't think that "darse" was the right verb for "to hit" - wouldn't that be golpear?

In American Enligsh, I would say "he elbowed me" The only phrase I know of that uses "give" is "he gave me the finger"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_ri
Dan_ri
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Don't forget the bloodthirsty cries at a prize fight ("Give it to 'em! Give 'em a jab! Give 'em another jab! Now give 'em the left hook!"). Also, i think there was a certain luchador americano famous for giving the People's Elbow.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brbert02
brbert02
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puedes oler lo qué la Roca está cocinando?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martind611973

I have the 79 dollar IsreaMegaWaft 11-9 Teletrinode Phone by Google Verticlz Industries/SYM so I can't look up luchador and Duolingo at the same time but heres ceramic head caps to you for tryin kid

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S-YBabette

I have had a long look in WordReference, (and its "forums") at all the different uses of "darse". I couldn't find a use where "darse", alone, meant "to hit (someone)" . Anybody know if this is a common use? Maybe in Mexico??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilipReese

SpanishDict gives "to hit" as a translation for darse. http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/dar

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jerrymack

In English He gave me the elbow or he elbowed me

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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It's not idiomatic. In English, we can turn a noun into a verb for the action of hitting with that object, but in Spanish, "dar" remains the verb: Dar un rodillazo (to knee someone), dar una patada a (to hit with a boot; the English "to boot" has taken in a more metaphoric meaning, of to have gotten rid of someone), dar un codazo (to elbow someone), dar un puñetazo (punch someone, in boxing), dar un cabezazo (headbutt someone). [I haven't quite worked out why it's not precisely a bodypart + "zo".]

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Im not sure if this is an idiom(sic). If not... what is the reason for the CON? "El me dio el codo" or "He gave me the elbow"(He elbowed me).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/muerdeelpolvo

I'm from Argentina and I almost never say that, I say "me golpeó (o me pegó) con el codo"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoreGalore

Use of the verb "dar" is what made this translation confusing, especially because in American English we have the expression "to give someone the elbow", as many people have noted in this discussion. To translate "dio" as "to hit" is where the big problem is here. "Golpear" makes infinitely more sense, so thank you for confirming that muerdeelpolvo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aaoshi
Aaoshi
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We don't have that expression in American English..... Only in british English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Do you say "dar un codazo"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mkmichael2
mkmichael2
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Thank You very much Sir

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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I don't think this is exactly an idiom, but rather, a collocation, which is a slightly different thing. An literal translation would be, "He gave it (to) me with his elbow," where the "it" and "to" are expressed in English but understood in Spanish. This is completely understandable and within the English way of saying such things, as are "he elbowed me" and the other variations noted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SkyBlueGum

I've never heard that expression in Spanish. It's more proper to say "Él me golpeó con el codo".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isaac64
isaac64
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"He gave me the elbow" at the very least in British English often refers to being dumped by a significant other. "We had been together two years before she gave me the elbow". Not the most delicate of ways to put it though!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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¡Ow!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thpppppht

I used "He hit me with an elbow" Since it said "el codo" I think "an" is as close as "his."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/naomi800298

I would never say 'he gave me the elbow'in canada. In fact I've never heard that expression before this post. Cool that is used in Britain. Love hearing the different international expressions from around the world. Iv would say' he hit me with his elbow' which means literally. .he hit me with his elbow. But if someone said 'the elbow' in this sentence than i would think it was oddly spoken.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusty325699
Dusty325699
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It is like kicking someone out... I have heard people saying they gave a person the spanish archer. Or. Wait for it... El bow

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dare3966
Dare3966
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I heard "El midio con el codo" "He measured with his elbow" , Which I like better than trying to figure out dio = golpeo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soreIIina
soreIIina
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Gave is wrong again

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lori.maill

I'm just wondering how 'el' can translate to mean 'his'. I thought if I wanted to say 'his' I had to use 'sus'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

That's usually the case, but with body parts, Spanish usually won't use possessive adjectives (unless it's needed for clarification

Me cepillo los dientes = I brush my teeth.

The only reason a possessive adjective would be used is if I'm brushing someone else's teeth.

Me duele el hombro - My shoulder hurts.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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If you are brushing somebody else's teeth you should say "le cepillo los dientes", not "cepillo sus dientes", that is called the "dative possessive case". It basically goes like this:

  • "Me" + determiner = my
  • "Te" + determiner = your
  • "Nos" + determiner = our
  • "Les" + determiner = their/your (formal)

And so on. For example:

  • Le duele un brazo (a ella) = One of her arms hurts.

The case used in the Duo sentence is called inalienable possession, sometimes it is used in conjunction with a verb, like "tener", for instance:

  • Tengo los ojos azules = My eyes are blue.

Or a preposition with nouns that cannot change owner, the list of nouns one can consider "inalienable" might differ from language to language, example:

  • "Él me golpeó con el codo en la cara".

The person delivering the hit is the subject (él), therefore it is his elbow and the person receiving the hit is the direct object (me), therefore it is my face.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FadingEcho

According to my mom (native speaker) you can also use 'sus'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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That would sound a bit weird for some people.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FatihEmreCan
FatihEmreCan
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Why is that not 'hits'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolyglotCanavar
PolyglotCanavar
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Because the sentence is conjugated past time.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FatihEmreCan
FatihEmreCan
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Ah evet. Gracias! ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DerekKee
DerekKee
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I didn't know my role. I didn't shut my mouth.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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¿No pudiste oler lo que La Roca estaba cocinando?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

If we have DAR - 'to give' translated as 'hit' in a previous lesson, I completely missed it. Can any one refer me to that lesson?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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In my Spanish dictionary, dar has something like 25 different meanings. To: give, hand over, pass, bear, produce, set, show, perform, put on, throw, deal, apply, strike, let out, utter, hit, press, turn on, crash into, etc. So I have decided if I ever cannot think of the word in Spanish, I can always use dar, chances are, it will fit.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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What about "He nudged me"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Multitaal
Multitaal
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Spanish dictionary says under idioms:
dar con el codo o de codo a algn - (Centroamérica) to nudge sb

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JellyLady1

El me dicho con el codo. He said to me with his elbow. This is what I thought the sentence was! Yikes! will I ever learn?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesBel17

Well, this may be one idiom you have to experience before achieving full understanding.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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Well, 2 sentences ago, proteins are important for YOUR health, was LA salud. Now el codo is HIS elbow. I put THE elbow, out of curiosity, and it was accepted. It seems a little confusing as to personal pronouns or not...And what is used when.. So could the same sentence be : Él me dio con su codo?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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You have to learn how to interpret the sentence to then translate it correctly, when you say in English "Proteins are important for your health", that 'your' is being used impersonally, it is not speaking about just your health, but everybody's health, the thing is that in English you normally use the pronoun you to speak impersonally, like I just did when I said "in English you normally use...·, you can also use one, but that's not as common, "Proteins are important for one's health".

In Spanish we normally use an article for the purpose of being impersonal, as in "Las proteínas son importantes para la salud", or just like in English you can use uno, as in "Las proteínas son importantes para la salud de uno", but that's just unnecessary. For the reason why "el codo" is being translated as "his elbow" in this sentence, read my comment to JuevesHuevos above.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debusscs

I'm thinking it would be good to just accept this as a sentence intended to teach something about Spanish. No, it makes no sense expert perhaps to a couple of children squabbling over whether Joe hit Jan intentionally with his elbow. But it does demonstrate that the Spanish word has multiple meanings. Some sentences in DL are really dumb. The one I hate the most asks what sign someone is, but they are trying to teach Spanish. That's the bottom line and I'm very grateful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deen14

he is so aggressive

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandiWL
BrandiWL
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We do say "He gave me the elbow."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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Of course, we do. Thank you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbc63
tbc63
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I would have used golpear if I were translating from English to Spanish. I don't see hit as an option for "dar".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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Well, now you can. Neither is "hit" an obvious synonym of 'give' in English, but it is and certainly can be used that way in everyday vernacular, as in, "... and then she gave him a blow to the head he won't soon forget."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baldwin44

Hit" is singular verb,shouldn't it be "he hits"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbc63
tbc63
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Dio is the past tense. If you wanted to say hits, you would use "de" (third person singular of dar).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mindyvt

didn't notice in the comments below...why is it not 'el me dio con su codo'? (sorry, can't seem to put the accent in here)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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answered by demsw, above

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mindyvt

thanks - obviously I didn't scroll down far enough (blush)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ParkHan

Where is "his"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dawn277745

My friend from Guatemala was showing me a gesture with his elbow and told me that it was a way of indicating the character trait of being "cheap." He said he didn't know where this gesture came from or why it came to mean this, but that it was common in Guat. I noticed in the Duo definitions (when you click on the new word) that "codo" also means "tightfisted." Definitely an idiom of some sort... Interesting...

BTW, the gesture was him kind of smacking his elbow into the palm of his opposite hand.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The3rdBeast

Would 'he elbowed me' work?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shunjie21

Is it he hit or he hits?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TracyS221
TracyS221
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He hit (past tense) is Él dio. He hits is present tense. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToyibOyeleye
ToyibOyeleye
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Muay thai fighting

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kjell687350
Kjell687350Plus
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Anyway, in Sweden we have an expression, giving sth with the elbow, meaning not wanting to give at all.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoringLuke
LoringLuke
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Quizás le quiere...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liam3.1415926535

This is a terrible sentence.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kjell687350
Kjell687350Plus
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If you offer someone sth. with the elbow in Sweden you really don`t want to give it away

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoanneBrown1

I also thought that this meant' he gave me the elbow'

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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It is close. But the problem is the con. He gave me the elbow would be Él me dio el codo. That's the simple subject verb indirect object direct object structure we have done many times. The con should alert you to the fact that the expression is somewhat idiomatic.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Colette984040

I agree

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marc577250

In Mexico, "codo duro" means tight fisted.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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That's interesting. I understand the logic of tight fisted. You make a tight fist to hold on to your money. Maybe their image is of someone elbowing people away to keep them from your money?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JJalilvand

There is no "su" therefore he hit me with elbow should be correct also.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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He hit me with elbow is colloquial at best. It certainly doesn't meet Duo's common for common standard.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BradBowlin1

"he gave me an elbow" should work, please add Duo

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chericher
Chericher
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I agree. I said, 'he gave me his elbow' as in he nudged me. Marked wrong.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Two things here. One, the expression is more like he gave me a/the elbow than he gave me his elbow. The latter would not make sense. The second is that you are attempting to make a somewhat idiomatic Spanish sentence into a different English idiom. This sentence does not mean that. This sentence assumes an accidental hit. An intentional hot would probably use either golpear or pegar. The Spanish expression to nudge or to elbow someone is similar, but uses a somewhat different word codazo. Él me dio un codazo

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Codazo

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/callum.tho1

el codo de la gente ??

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenStent

But the sentence says give not hit

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whigamore1

The sentence says "dió" (from "dar"), which has several meanings aside from transferring a physical item from one person to another. One of those meanings is "to hit." Even in English, depending on context, "give" can have similar meanings. For instance, what would you interpret "He gave it to me with his elbow" to mean?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ViolaM9d

Of course DL counted it wrong, but I wondered how one might say 'He gave me an elbow,' much as one might help a lady or grandmother walk down a sidewalk or cross the street...? That's how I interpreted it.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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That expression isn't far off in Spanish, actually, at least in terms of sound. . It would be Él me dio un codazo. Codazo is used for any sort of nudge or poke but especially with an elbow, and would also be used to say that somebody "elbowed" their way through a crowd.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Codazo

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wwj101
wwj101
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How about, he got me with his elbow

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I don't think that makes too much sense in English, certainly not more than hit. And got is not a normal translation for the verb dar, so I see no advantage.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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It may be a bit of a stretch as a literal translation, but as an interpretive one, it is valid and makes complete sense in English. Like dar in Spanish, one of the informal meanings for "get/got" (a true chameleon among English verbs) is to hit. Anyone who has spent time watching American movies is certain to be familiar with the expression, "I got him!"

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/get

I13.g informal To hit or strike: She got him on the chin. The bullet got him in the arm.)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1rjU9yOO

Why "con"? Isn't the literal translation "he gave me his elbow"? If so, isn't el codo just a direct object?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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No el codo, even of you take this sentence literally, is the object of the preposition con. The object of a preposition is never the direct object, although there are some Spanish phrasal verbs which make it look as if they are. The use of dar to mean to hit is one of the intransitive meanings of the verb.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Dar

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AhmedMetwa547013

This is very understandable only to Arabic speakers

4 weeks ago