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  5. "Thank you? You're welcome"

"Thank you? You're welcome"

Translation:Grazie? Prego

July 15, 2013

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReneScheibe

Why is "Thank you?" a question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamaisVou

I think it's like "you're thanking me? please, it's ok, don't mention it.. etc."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

It wouldn't make sense if the same person said both sentences.

So, one said "grazie", the other was surprised and asked back: "grazie?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SivanaP.D.E.H.

Because whomever they are saying thank you to gave them a compliment that they are not sure is a compliment and they are trying to decide if they are thankful or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaBa07

Because the person wanted to hear the thank you. It's more of a sarcastic thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EspaTalia

I thought "ti prego" was how to say please, like a synonym for "per favore." Does this mean that "Prego" can mean either? I'm assuming, from this, that it depends on the context, like how the word "mañana" can mean "morning" or "tomorrow," in Spanish. I'd appreciate a correction, if I'm on the wrong track.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2612

"Ti prego" means "I pray you", and it's the verbal equivalent of prostrating yourself in front of someone; a favourite of little children begging their parents alongside "ti supplico", I beg you. "Prego" is another beast entirely, and used in totally different contexts (more than a few, unfortunately for students).

Edit: To be fair, in formal speech "La prego di" + infinitive, and in bureaucratic speech "È pregato/a di " + infinitive are indeed the equivalent of a "please".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emma327671

I dont understand why after grazie is a ? and not a .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2471

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thi-fcr

Because the person speaking is in doubt wheter someone ha e thanked him or not. So you ask "Grazie?" like "Are u thanking me? That's ok. Don't mention it."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wildleoappeared

di niente is accepted :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardoBo936374

you are welcome is like sei il benvenuto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2471

Only in the sense of "You are welcome inside my home."

As the response to "thank you/grazie", it is "prego".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtnHrng

Why can't I say "Ti ringrazio" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

I wonder if there is another expression in English for "You're welcome". With same meaning (no need to thank me). I can not remember what I learned at school. I think it's such a weird expression that I have to come up with a story to remember it and only the last part is said out loud: "(I did it for you with pleasure. If you need me again for the same, then) You're welcome". Can a native speaker answer this, preferably from the UK?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2471

I'm a native speaker from the USA, but various ways to respond to "Thank you" include:

  • You're welcome.
  • Don't mention it.
  • No problem.
  • It was nothing.
  • Anytime.
  • My pleasure.
  • Sure thing.

Obviously, some are more informal than others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

Thank you. Next time I will try "My pleasure" as translation for "Prego", and see how Duo feels about that. I wiil do the same for Swedish and German. BTW, I forgot a part of my short story: "...then knock on my door:..."

Several weeks later: Duo accepts "My pleasure".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sheev.Palpatine

"no problem" or "sure" are the responses that I usually hear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caspar253215

In the UK we often say "pleasure" as in "its my pleasure" much like "you're welcome".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValentinSe14370

I know that Benvenuto is You are welcome. I don't understand, why do you write the word Benvenuto, just to confuse the student?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2471

Different sense of the English word "welcome".

Benvenuto = Welcome to my home.

Prego = what you say in response to "grazie".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nebia92

Why doesn't "volentieri" work as "you're welcome"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2612

"Volentieri" means "gladly", so it's never the reply to thanks; it can be the reply to being requested or offered something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zabrunga

Can we say fa niente instead of prego?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ronhallige

Why is prego your welcome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2471

"Prego" is not "you're welcome". "Prego" is the response to "grazie".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tcclimber

Does Italian use the upside down ¿ Or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

No, Italian doesn't use the upside down question mark. As far as I know, Spanish is the only language in which this punctuation mark is used; in Spanish, the upside-down question mark stands for the beginning of the sentence (question) and the regular question mark after the sentence.

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