"Thank you? You're welcome"

Translation:Grazie? Prego

July 15, 2013

71 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReneScheibe

Why is "Thank you?" a question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamaisVou

I think it's like "you're thanking me? please, it's ok, don't mention it.. etc."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

It wouldn't make sense if the same person said both sentences.

So, one said "grazie", the other was surprised and asked back: "grazie?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SivanaP.D.E.H.

Because whomever they are saying thank you to gave them a compliment that they are not sure is a compliment and they are trying to decide if they are thankful or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gnasheroos

He's so surprised someone thanked him because all duo's workers are so rude and hes all like, YOU THANKED ME?! HOORAY!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaBa07

Because the person wanted to hear the thank you. It's more of a sarcastic thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElianeMari701136

Pai de uma forma que os Pai do estado


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sattarsale1

to be complete sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElianeMari701136

Pai do estado do Rio de


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EspaTalia

I thought "ti prego" was how to say please, like a synonym for "per favore." Does this mean that "Prego" can mean either? I'm assuming, from this, that it depends on the context, like how the word "mañana" can mean "morning" or "tomorrow," in Spanish. I'd appreciate a correction, if I'm on the wrong track.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica

"Ti prego" means "I pray you", and it's the verbal equivalent of prostrating yourself in front of someone; a favourite of little children begging their parents alongside "ti supplico", I beg you. "Prego" is another beast entirely, and used in totally different contexts (more than a few, unfortunately for students).

Edit: To be fair, in formal speech "La prego di" + infinitive, and in bureaucratic speech "È pregato/a di " + infinitive are indeed the equivalent of a "please".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wildleoappeared

di niente is accepted :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

I wonder if there is another expression in English for "You're welcome". With same meaning (no need to thank me). I can not remember what I learned at school. I think it's such a weird expression that I have to come up with a story to remember it and only the last part is said out loud: "(I did it for you with pleasure. If you need me again for the same, then) You're welcome". Can a native speaker answer this, preferably from the UK?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 3125

I'm a native speaker from the USA, but various ways to respond to "Thank you" include:

  • You're welcome.
  • Don't mention it.
  • No problem.
  • It was nothing.
  • Anytime.
  • My pleasure.
  • Sure thing.

Obviously, some are more informal than others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

Thank you. Next time I will try "My pleasure" as translation for "Prego", and see how Duo feels about that. I wiil do the same for Swedish and German. BTW, I forgot a part of my short story: "...then knock on my door:..."

Several weeks later: Duo accepts "My pleasure".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sheev.Palpatine

"no problem" or "sure" are the responses that I usually hear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caspar253215

In the UK we often say "pleasure" as in "its my pleasure" much like "you're welcome".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

I'm a native speaker from the UK and I too think to dismiss thanks with "You're welcome" is weird. You're right, JoseeV64, it's as if the speaker is omitting the first part of what he intends to say. :-)

I would say "Don't mention it" or "Not at all". I've heard people say "I'm glad to have been of assistance". A lot of younger people say "No problem".

The use of "You're welcome" seems to be growing here in the UK and that doesn't bother me but I hate Duolingo's attachment to American terms. Sometimes I feel I'm having to think in three languages: the target language, my native English and American English! Of course, many learners on Duolingo are having to learn a target language through a language like English they learned at school and may not be confident in - very hard I'm sure! But I'm grumbling because as a native English speaker I'm spoiled! :-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

While on the subject of "You're welcome!", I've heard that in Quebec people have started to respond to "Merci!" with "Bienvenue!" under the influence of their neighbours across the border. I shudder to think what the Académie Française thinks of that! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emma327671

I dont understand why after grazie is a ? and not a .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thi-fcr

Because the person speaking is in doubt wheter someone ha e thanked him or not. So you ask "Grazie?" like "Are u thanking me? That's ok. Don't mention it."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardoBo936374

you are welcome is like sei il benvenuto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 3125

Only in the sense of "You are welcome inside my home."

As the response to "thank you/grazie", it is "prego".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtnHrng

Why can't I say "Ti ringrazio" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValentinSe14370

I know that Benvenuto is You are welcome. I don't understand, why do you write the word Benvenuto, just to confuse the student?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 3125

Different sense of the English word "welcome".

Benvenuto = Welcome to my home.

Prego = what you say in response to "grazie".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ronhallige

Why is prego your welcome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 3125

"Prego" is not "you're welcome". "Prego" is the response to "grazie".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nebia92

Why doesn't "volentieri" work as "you're welcome"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica

"Volentieri" means "gladly", so it's never the reply to thanks; it can be the reply to being requested or offered something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElianeMari701136

Pai de uma forma que os


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zabrunga

Can we say fa niente instead of prego?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

According to the Word Hippo website if someone thanks you you can say "di niente" instead of "prego" in reply. I've not yet come across "fa niente".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tcclimber

Does Italian use the upside down ¿ Or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

No, Italian doesn't use the upside down question mark. As far as I know, Spanish is the only language in which this punctuation mark is used; in Spanish, the upside-down question mark stands for the beginning of the sentence (question) and the regular question mark after the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AthenaRosa333

Does di niente work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

According to the Word Hippo website, "di niente" can be used instead of "prego" if someone thanks you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helene144823

Heisst doch danke , und willkommen so haben wir es in der Schule auch gelernt.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

In German if someone says "Danke!" the answer if "Bitte!" If you are welcoming someone to a place you say "Willkommen!"

In Italian if someone says "Grazie!" the answer is "Prego!" If you are welcoming someone to a place you say "Benvenuto/a/i/e!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dazzy2021

Why the hell is it a question... and Duolingo STOP TRYING TO FORCE IS TO BUY IT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElianeMari701136

Pai do Amazonas energia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DinaLu207

con piacere should work as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

I know "per piacere" means the same as "per favore". I haven't come across "con piacere" yet but it sounds as if it means you did the favour "with pleasure". I may be wrong. Anyway, it's really a matter of whether Italian-speakers actually say it, though, isn't it? Can any native Italian-speakers advise us?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul_2006D

An image is missing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AthenaRosa333

Shouldn't di niente work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.vfpNcX

Maaze aaa rahe hai


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.vfpNcX

Hi I am Ishika jangid


[deactivated user]

    In spanish, we use two types of punctuation ¡! And ¿?. Is there any such rule in Italian ae well or we simply write it like, grazie!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

    Italian doesn't use upside down ! and ? punctuation marks at the start of a sentence. See on this page what JoseeV64 wrote in reply to Tcclimber.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarefulZebra

    I said Prego first but marked it wrong. Only accepting Di Niente. Why is this?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mnarhins

    You're supposed to put Grazie first.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanHearnd

    Why did they both have capital letters at the start? Thats not how either grammar work. English or Italian


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

    What is your problem? After the question mark starts a new sentence.
    "Thank you? You're welcome." Two sentences.
    Grazie? Prego. Two sentences.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becca1890

    Is di benveuto correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
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    • 3125

    No, "benvenuto" is only for the sense of "welcome to my home". It can not be used as the response to "thank you".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tojorab

    I wrote "Grazie? tu sei benvenuto" why is this wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giuliap

    Because, while "you are welcome" literally translates as "Sei il benvenuto", the standard answer to "Grazie" is "Prego".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcello.l89

    To be more specific why you are wrong, "benvenuto" is a type of contraction of two separate words, also conjugated for usage and meaning. Together, those two words do NOT form a response to the phrase "thank you/grazie" in any sense. To clarify, "ben" in benvenuto is a form of "bene" (meaning good), and "venuto," a form of "venire" (meaning to come). Your usage would only be used when welcoming someone into your home, country, back from a trip, etc. The usage in the context of this exercise is only a response to thank you.

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