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  5. "She returned and she left ag…

"She returned and she left again."

Translation:D'fhill sí agus d'imigh sí arís.

December 15, 2014

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gustopher94

Why does "arís" break the caol le caol agus leathan le leathan rule?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

Because it was originally two words (a rís, to be precise; compare Scottish Gaelic a-rithist), like anseo (ann seo) and aniar ("an iar"). Note that Irish words are always stressed on the first syllable, too - except for compounds like arís. See here: http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic104727.html And here: http://www.daltai.com/discus/messages/13510/55167.html?1299023262

Just in case, ae is always classed as broad - to have a slender vowel after, it needs to be aei. e never occurs immediately before a consonant in any other circumstance - it's always rendered ea or ei.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Munster speakers might disagree with your statement on syllable stress.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

You mean when Munster speakers stress syllables with long vowels even if not initial? I supposed that was a glaring omission seeing as I'm particularly going after Munster - GRMA!

While I'm at it, I should probably say that prepositional pronouns like agam and chugaibh are stressed on the second syllable too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsmitten

Is there a difference between "imigh" and "fág"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

imigh is like go (away). You can't use it for like 'she left the food'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsmitten

But you can use fág for go away? At least that's how some earlier sentences used it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yes. áit a fhágáil means 'to leave a place.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vera_jimull

She wouldn't stay with Pól after all..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomasdeb

Is "is" correct as a variant of "agus"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Not really. It's fairly common in spoken Irish, but in written Irish it is largely relegated to set phrases (such as numbers (bliain is fiche - "21 (years old)", a dó is a trí, sin a cúig), and of course, it's not unusual in songs, where it's single syllable might be a better fit for meter than the 2 syllables of agus. But in most written Irish, it's usually written out as agus.

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