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"Hemos pasado mucho tiempo juntos."

Translation:We have spent a lot of time together.

5 years ago

74 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/aotoolester

To pass time with someone makes sense in English. "We have passed a lot of time together" should be accepted no?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Manhattan95

It's very rare to say that in English though. The more common way to say this is "We have spent a lot of time together."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PinkyGreen

Just because it is not as common, doesn't mean it's incorrect. Also, I think it's more common in some places than others.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guomashi
guomashi
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Sorry, but it is common speech, both grammatically and stylistically correct. If you haven't heard it, that is your limitation. Marking it wrong is bad enough. Falsely justifying it is worse. It needs to be accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KTenespanol

Rare or not,using "passed" is proper English in this context and a correct translation. It can be used and should be accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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"We have been together for a long time" was not accepted, though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Manhattan95

That would be something more along the lines of "Hemos estado juntos" rather than "Hemos pasado mucho tiempo juntos." But I can see why people would put that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I know. I put My translation should be accepted. Then added a comment "I think, maybe"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

Yes, I noticed that here this 'long' is not accepted (as < 'mucho') even if in another palace it was OK. ..makes me wonder.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I think that's because in this sentence the word "mucho" is translated as either "much" or "a lot of."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Good comment, Linda. Haven't seen any posts of you in a long while.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PepiEspo0

It s/be accepted. They have to check the dictionary

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CraigNiede

Sorry, I use the phrase "passed time" a lot, and I'm an editor of an English language journal. Don't make assumptions about language usage based on your own experience.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLBump

"We have spent a lot of time together." is what I put and it was accepted, October 2017

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Yes, it should be accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/howcheng
howcheng
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Better to pass time than gas.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoctilucaFirefly

It is accepted as of 11/6/13!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KTenespanol

Yep :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nayrad
nayrad
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Just because it makes sense doesn't mean it is good english.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skartom
skartom
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is lots of time ok? it didn't accept

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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"We have spent lots of time together" sounds normal and correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flipperlee

Yup. That should be right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinJan
MartinJan
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I agree

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

The word "spent" is the past participle of "spend." The word "passed" is the past participle of "pass." Although the sentence in question and your sentence both have the same connotative meaning, Duo wants the participle that translates literally.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Look at it again. The word under question was "much".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

When I commented on the word "spent," I was referring to the comment "We have spent a lot of time together," which does sound normal and correct. However, "We have passed a lot of time together" also sounds correct, at least to me. Maybe it's a regional thing. ;^)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sonalimudunuri

Yeah, that's exactly what I put...I reported a problem...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ashley2446

it didn't work but i agree

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

See my reply to PepiEspo0. However, gernt is right as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angela361493

it still won't accept 'lots'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milus38

"We've ... " instead of "we have..." was marked wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mlreams
mlreams
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I'm just confused because We've and We have are the same thing in English. I lost my last heart on this question :/ lol

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

You should report it, but it may have been corrected since you posted this comment two years ago.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mlreams
mlreams
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It told me "We've spent much time together" was wrong...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It's not wrong, but the Duo program hasn't been fixed so that it can handle the variation that you introduced.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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Still rejecting "lots of" several years later! Reporting.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

is JUNTO without the "S" a word. Im asking is JUNTOS the plural form of JUNTO?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2
Melita2
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Yes, in this case, juntos is an adjective and agrees with the subject, which is plural. If the sentence were speaking of women, this would be juntas.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Can you give an example of a sentence using "junto" and supply a translation of that sentence into English?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mlreams
mlreams
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Quédate junto/junta a mí, que tengo miedo.

Stay close to me, I'm scared.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Good example lingot as thanks.

So, what I know so far: "quedate" is imperative/command mood/mode. What this means is that third person singular is used without a subject pronoun, with the consequence that the direct object pronoun is added after the stem verb instead of before it, just as object pronouns can be suffixes for infinitives and participles.

Accordingly, is "quédate junto" (literally, "remain us together") the same connotative meaning as "junta a mí (literally, together with me)? Also, in your example, could "que" be loosely translated as "because?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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Y esto es por qué nos casamos.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeedleBoo

Why is there an "s" after junto, but no "s" after the other words?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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hemos is "we have". The other words don't directly describe us, but juntos does. So juntos has to be plural because we are plural. But don't try to analyze this. Rules make fair crutches for a little while, but it works a lot better to hear and repeat. Somos dos personas juntas = we are two people together. (Every word is plural) Estamos juntos = we're together. Juntos por siempre = together forever. (forever doesn't directly describe us, it says the situation is forever)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeedleBoo

Thank you gernt

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I do not have a talent for language. I am unable to listen and then learn. If it were not for the rules that I have memorized, I would not be as advanced as I have become. Some people learn when they listen. Others learn when they read. I am one of the latter. It is true that people who learn the rules perhaps may never speak fluently. However, at least they become able to read another language, as I can now do with Spanish. There is more than one way to learn.

No tengo talento para el lenguaje. Soy incapaz de escuchar y luego aprender. Si no fuera por las reglas que he memorizado, no estaría tan avanzada como me he convertido. Algunas personas aprenden cuando escuchan. Otros aprenden cuando leen. Yo soy uno de los últimos. Es verdad que la gente que aprende las reglas quizás nunca puede hablar con fluidez. Sin embargo, al menos se vuelven capaces de leer otro idioma, como ahora puedo hacer con el español. Hay más de una manera de aprender.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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No one has much of a knack for a language they didn't hear as an infant. The normal process is thought to begin at about nine months of age. I have a student right now who writes and reads English well. She hopes to learn to understand the news on TV. It isn't easy for me to understand the news in Spanish. I've observed that those who live immersed in their second language can get very proficient. Those who continue to speak their first language at home and with their friends struggle indefinitely. That's me. And yes, a rule or two has helped a lot. The best one was Spanish subjects need an article, and that noun after "me gusta" is a subject. I wish I knew who said that. It was in these Duolingo threads.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chyoke
ChyokePlus
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5 minutes into Netflix and Chill and he says this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CScubing
CScubing
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Would we have spent money, still use pasado or does it use another word?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

You seem to be confusing "pasar" (to pass) with "pagar" (to pay).

The translation of the word "pasado," which is "passed," is not used in English in order to talk about money. If you are talking about money, think: gastar dinero (to spend money) or gastar moneda (to spend coins/currency) or pagar dinero/moneda (to pay money/coins/currency).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolishMathew
PolishMathew
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Yeah, as of today it's 472 days :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PepiEspo0

Long time s/ be O.K.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tompoonjar

past participle of spend is used . spend - spent - spend.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

See my answer to Sullivan12345.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2MeijS

I agree with aotoolester

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LastChance_15

This is my love story with Duolingo. Better than Twilight!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PiaKonstmann
PiaKonstmann
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Spend vs spent ... When many little errors (and som big ones) can pass as "almost correct" I would like so much it was the same with this little mistake I've made some time now; spelling "spent" with a d ("spend") and even the rest of the sentence is correct, this little d instead of d makes the answer "Wrong!!" instead of "Almost correct" :)

English is not my native language (surprise ;) ) and this is absolutely a great way to learn both more English and Spanish at the same time. And for free (y)
A huge respect for that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahaun

Isn't junto is this sentence an adverb, not an adjective, and, should therefore be singular?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobChristiansen

i have trouble seeing the difference between tenemos an hemos

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mlreams
mlreams
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Tener vs Haber

Tengo, Tienes, Tiene, Tenemos, Tienen

He, Has, Ha, Hemos, Han

Tenemos una casa: We have a house. (possession)

Tenemos que comprar una casa: We have to buy a house. (urgency/obligation)

Hemos comprado una casa: We have bought a house. (present perfect)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TommySF
TommySF
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It is interesting that some times, DuoLingo wants us to translate verbatim even though it doesn't quite sound right in English. Other times, they want us to SUBSTITUTE a more common English equivalent word or phrase instead. Je commence à penser que DuoLingo...... tener su pastel y comerlo también. Honestly, I believe there is logic in this madness, but.....in the short term, it drives us loco. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/violinda41
violinda41
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"a great deal of time" is the same as "a lot of time." My answer should be accepted.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reichdalmeida1

We spent a lot of time together = the same

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KTenespanol

pasado translates as "passed" as well. DL marked me wrong :/ Asked them to correct.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KTenespanol

I've tried: "We have passed a lot of time together" and "We have passed much time together" both are still being marked incorrect. Reported again ;) ¡Buena suerte!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobChristiansen

a gringo would say, tenemos

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris259822

to pass time or spend time? Come on folks at Duo!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carla590099

I wrote "alot" instead of "a lot" and got marked off for it. Instead of "much," I wrote "alot."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

There is no such English word as "alot," but there is the English noun "lot" preceded by the English determiner/article "a."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Khalyousifie

"We have spent too much time together" rejected.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Mucho ≠ too much. It's not a matter of quantity. Rather, it's a matter of sufficiency and degree. Depending on what is needed, "a lot" may be a sufficient or an insufficient amount. However, "too much" is, by definition, more than sufficient. Both do refer to large amounts but that is unimportant. What is important when "a lot" becomes "too much."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/originalnab

From a native speaker point of view, "We have hung out a lot together" is the most natural way of saying this and should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2MeijS

I don't agree. The nearer it is to proper English translations the better. Otherwise all kinds of "local expressions" will be used. I have some exceptional ones if thats what you want.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zekecoma

Now let's watch Netflix and chill.

3 years ago