Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"An níonn tú?"

Translation:Do you wash?

3 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Mongolieoin

Even Presidents have to wash, Paul.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VaclavH

even the pope does!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Ach amhain i uisce coisricthe agus sopa coisricthe

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ueueueueue
ueueueueue
  • 15
  • 11
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

Not a question you want to hear...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidStyIes
DavidStyIesPlus
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 20
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 9
  • 278

Knowing DL's usual standards of flirting, this'll be added to the "Flirting" bonus skill when such arrives :p

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3

Is níonn synonymous with bathe (as in wash oneself), or is it more general like washing dishes?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidStyIes
DavidStyIesPlus
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 20
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 9
  • 278

Well, in this lesson we also have "Ním an cat" as "I wash the cat", so it is at least available as a transitive verb. Its intransitive use here suggests both meanings work in Irish.

Also, don't wash your cat.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silmeth
silmeth
  • 22
  • 22
  • 10
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2
  • 31

Polish book for standardized Munster Irish, An Ghaeilge by E. Gussmann and A. Doyle gives (p. 123, Ceacht 17) Níonn sí í féin as reflexive she washes [herself]).

Basing on that, I would ask a reflexive question do you wash [yourself]? as:

An níonn tú thú féin?

I wonder if that’d be correct (and if simple an níonn tú? has the same meaning, and if an níonn tú féin? would be possible).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 23
  • 15
  • 404

An níonn tú thú féin?

I think it would be An níonn tú tú féin and yes, that is how you would ask it.

an níonn tú féin?

You might ask a youngster An níonn tú? or An níonn tú féin? if you wanted to know if he/she helped with the washing (of crockery, clothes, etc.).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silmeth
silmeth
  • 22
  • 22
  • 10
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2
  • 31

From the Daltaí Forums:

An Focal, de réir na Leabhar Ó Siadhail ;-)

“When used disjunctively, that is, not as a subject directly following on a verb form, thú, é, í, iad or thusa, eisean, ise, iadsan are used. Mé/mise, muid/muide, sibh/sibhse remain the same.”

And, regarding word order:

Cloisim anois thú. I hear you now. Tigim thusa anois ach ní thigim iad sin. I understand you now, but I don’t understand those fellows.

Wouldn’t that mean that my sentence – An níonn tú thú féin? – is correct? Is this a dialect vs caighdeán thing?

FGB also states and gives examples:

(Form thú used as object of vb.) (a) (Direct object) Aithním thú, I recognise you. Níor dhearmad sé thú, he didn’t forget you. (b) (With autonomous vb.) An áit ar rugadh thú, where you were born. (Var: tu, thu)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 23
  • 15
  • 404

Wouldn’t that mean that my sentence – An níonn tú thú féin? – is correct?

Yes you are right. Thanks for the information.
Graiméar Gaeilge na mBráithre Críostaí says:

13.2 Úsáidtear thú mar chuspóir briathair: molaim thú, caillfear thú, agus nuair is ainmní é ar lorg na faisnéise in abairt chopaileach: mo cheol thú

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silmeth
silmeth
  • 22
  • 22
  • 10
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2
  • 31

Go raibh maith agat. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

"Also, don't wash your cat."

Actually it is easy. You just have to spit out the hair off your tongue.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dandelionmagic
dandelionmagic
  • 16
  • 15
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 265

Well, arguably there are times when you SHOULD wash your cat, they can be a bit too curious for their own good sometimes.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 23
  • 15
  • 404

Is níonn synonymous with bathe (as in wash oneself), or is it more general like washing dishes?

No, it is more general. Níonn tú (rud éigin).
Níonn tú na gréithre = You wash the crockery.
Níonn tú thú féin = You wash yourself.
The sentence above is just anglicised Irish and is an example of linguistic substitution described very well here

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eikoopmit

I ask this one on all my first dates.

Then again, I haven't had any yet...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Don't ask just shove them in the shower to avoid any nasty surprises ??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

Sort of an open ended question. Are you asking "Do you wash?" as in "Do you bath regularly?" Mind you don't leave the immersion on. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileanoirCM

The immersion should really be included in the Ireland lesson: https://youtu.be/0sexFLlAefw

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bush6984
Bush6984
  • 22
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Thank you for sharing this!!!

After watching that and wondering the entire time what he meant by "immersion," I had to look it up. It's pretty entertaining that the site itself as well added "emmersion: where you turn off the hot water tank – just tell an irish person you left your immersion on and watch the fear in their eyes." thereby pretty well confirming his standup routine's theme.

http://bumpsandroundabouts.com/2015/01/speak-irish-beginners-guide-irish-slang/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

I had a row many years ago with a colleague in work with whom I shared a house who kept leaving the immersion heater on at the expensive rate.He still managed to smell despite his frequent bathing because he never washed his clothes.I got him a job with the Antarctic Survey so they probably buried him in the ice after about a week of close contact.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

The "immersion tank" is the "hot water tank" - the heating element is immersed in the water in the tank

The "immersion" is usually in what other people call a cupboard, but in Ireland is usually referred to as a press, and this is known as "the hot press", where linens and towels, etc are usually stored. This is also known as the "airing cupboard" in some places.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 23
  • 15
  • 404

This is an example of thinking in English and then translating directly into Irish. In Irish it would be something like An níonn tú thú féin. A young child might ask this of another.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josh.Hogan
Josh.Hogan
  • 20
  • 16
  • 10
  • 10
  • 3
  • 11

Yes, quarterly.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
  • 23
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 568

Once a year, whether I need it or not!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lg72xx
lg72xx
  • 25
  • 974

gach 29 Feabhra

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bearlachas
Bearlachas
  • 16
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 174

Probably my favorite Duolingo sentence yet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazzaru

what about an nionn tu na soithí ? is that correct to say do you wash the dishes ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 23
  • 15
  • 404

Yes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazzaru

go raibh maith agat

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BardAaron

What is the difference between níonn and glanann?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 23
  • 15
  • 404

Níonn sé = he washes.
Glanann sé = he cleans.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BardAaron

Those sound the same to me. Or is níonn bathing?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

When a parent tells a teenager to "clean your room", it's is highly unlikely that they expect a bucket of water to be involved in the process.

"Washing" is one particular process that can be used in "cleaning" and means that liquids are involved, but "dusting" and "polishing" are also cleaning processes that don't involve liquids, as well as the "picking up" and "tidying" usually expected of teenagers or users of fast food restaurants and picnic spaces, who usually "clean up" after themselves.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 23
  • 15
  • 404

You can clean some objects with a dry cloth, e.g. spectacles.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wolf_of_Erin

Daily. Thanks,. Duolingo, unlike you I break my back on a daily basis while working with fire and steel. Tu madra.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileanoirCM

I should hope so.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FearsomeElf

No.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mollyisawalrus

That's kind of a personal question, Duo...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Yes once a year whether I need it or not !!!

1 year ago