"Har du dine frugter?"

Translation:Do you have your fruit?

December 16, 2014

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamSidnel

Shouldn't 'Have you your fruit' be accepted- admittedly it's a little archaic by English's standards

July 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianReily

I second this.

December 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HannahSpreckley

How do you know when to use each form of your?

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rmnt_drawings

dit if word is neutral (t-word) din if it is common (n-word) dine if it is plural

January 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alicyia1

How do I know if a word id neutral or common? Is it just guesswork at that point?

December 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffKroeger

Never leave home without your fruit!

September 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ILoveDanish

Not correct answer. Fructer is prural . pls check

May 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

Fruit is uncountable in English (you say "two pieces of fruit", not "two fruits"), but in Danish it isn't. This sentence is talking about multiple pieces of fruit.

Har du din frugt? - Do you have your fruit? (one piece)
Har du dine frugter? - Do you have your fruit? (several pieces)

So when translating from English to Danish in this case, both din frugt and dine frugter should be accepted.

[2019/06/18]

June 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3000letters

'Have you your fruit?' is as acceptable as 'have you got your fruit in English'

January 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gust23

Where the got comes from

April 4, 2016
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