"Ella tiene que saber."

Translation:She has to know.

5 years ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sialia2
Sialia2
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Shouldn't "She needs to know" be acceptable? It was marked wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Tener = Have / Necesitar = Need ;]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicolletAve
NicolletAve
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In English there is no colloquial distinction between "needs to" and "has to".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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That is not true in this case. If someone tells me "she needs to know," I feel that I must tell her what I haven't been telling her. If someone says "She has to know." It means she can't still be in the dark, she must already know. It is stating that with all the clues around, she knows. How can she not know? Why if she still says she does not know, she may not want to know or may not want to talk about it and if we tell her, she may act like it is not possible or that we are lying.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bpo
bpo
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Seems like the English is ambiguous between the "needs" synonym and the "assertion of truth" synonym you're identifying here.

"If she wants to be a linguist, she has to know how to conjugate." (obligation) "She took three years of language courses. She has to know how to conjugate." (assertion)

Is the Spanish just equally ambiguous with "tener que"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

Good question bpo--and it doesn't look like anyone's given a straight answer (at least not with any evidence beyond opinion).

Could somebody check my reasoning here? Judging by http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/tener%20que, "tener que" translates directly as "to have to [act]"--with the sense only of obligation (must, ought to), not the alternate English meaning of assertion (to surely/already have). So "Ella tener que saber" = "She has to know," implying she must be informed, not that she already has this knowledge. Correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InsGadget

I don't agree with this at all. "She has to know" could very mean a call to action that it is imperative to tell her.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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I too disagree with allintolearning, and would take "she has to know" as meaning something like "it is life threathening, we simply must tell her now. She has to know (the truth)" etc.

I think that each of "have to/ ought to/ needs to/ must/ should" are acceptable translations. Each can be used to express the same meaning. Without more details in the sentence it is impossible for us to know the exact message that the sentence wants to get across.

@allintolearning; I would take the stress on "has", as in "she HAS to know" to mean that it is imperative that she know, or equivalently "she must be told/ she ought to be told/ she needs to be told" etc.

I notice that you are from Cali, I am speaking British-English. I wonder if that makes a difference?

Either way, I defenitely think that either translation is acceptable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Well now, if she doesn't already know than someone better tell her, but she could just as easily know.

"She has to know." is more along the lines of "It is important that she know." but it doesn't necessarily mean she does not know. I believe the difference depends on which word is accented as well as context. "She has to know. Will you tell her or should I?" or "She has to know. How couldn't she?"

The point is that "She needs to know." also means that it is important that she knows, but never means that she already knows. She could know or not know but that is never indicated by the word "needs" whereas in English the words "She has to know" is used as an expression meaning "she must know."(already is assumed)

"I have to do it." = "I must do it." = "I need to do it." but "She has to know." has two possible meanings which the last alternative does not share.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rwmorris

A legitimate use, but not the only one. Allintolearning also gave a legitimate use.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/james.ray1
james.ray1
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"She has to know" can have several meanings, and depends on the context and tone of voice. It can mean that she doesn't know and has the right or obligation to know; or it could mean an assertion that she knows. it depends on the tone of voice for what the meaning of: "she has to know is".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicolletAve
NicolletAve
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I can see that; I didn't think of that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mpaulson44

How about she should know

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kekistanese
Kekistanese
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I disagree. "She needs to" and "has/have to" are both relate to something vital. "You need to eat food to survive" "You have to eat food to survive"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rubescube

I agree

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pjtemes
Pjtemes
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I agree completely! And it looks like Duo hasn't fixed this in two years!! I just got it "wrong" twice in the same lesson! What a bunch of baloney!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/simon.sawy

What is the "que" doing in there?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavmarx
Lavmarx
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Basically the same thing "to" is doing in the English sentence. Whenever you have "have to" you should use "tener que", they're like a team.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanRoth2
DanRoth2
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I find the "que" interesting, since "saber" itself means "to know"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rwmorris

That is how infinitives are translated into English. To a Spanish native, an infinitive is just a word that may or may not have the "to" implication we do in English, it may have a gerund implication, it may actually have a conjugated verb 'sense.' We cannot automatically translate an infinitive as "to __." The infinitive form is grammatically correct in Spanish, but it's sense/meaning can be many other things.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

rwmorris and danroth2, that's why it is so confusing to lower-level learners; in English the infinitive means the "to" is already expected to accompany the verb (that's what makes it an infinitive!). So, in one lesson sentence we see an "a" pop up, & find out it means "to" in front of a "to + verb," and the next instance it's a "que" in front of a "to + verb," & we learn they are BOTH necessary, on "some" special verbs -- my head will spin learning those. Or, I'll just have to let them "trickle into" my brain one at a time, so I won't translate it "to-to." ...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolomorphicShawn
HolomorphicShawn
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Tener que + infinitive = To have to + infinitive (expresses obligation) Example! Yo tengo que hacerlo ( I have to do it)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/y4dn1

Oh, parece una frase de telenovela... "Marco, ella tiene que saber la verdad" "No, podemos guardar el secreto hasta que su salud este eatable" "Está agonizando Marco, no se puede morir sin saber la verdad" "Ana, si Paola se entera de que tu hijo es mio nos odiara a ambos. ¡Eres su hermana! ¡Yo soy su esposo!" "Pero todo esto fue antes de que la conocieras" "No Ana, yo... yo no puedo. Si ella no logra perdonarnos yo me quebrare..." "Si tu no se lo dices se lo diré yo" "Decirle qué" dice el hijo de Ana al entrar en la habitación. Ana y Marco quedan atónitos "¿Qué le dirás a quién?" FIN. ESTA HISTORIA CONTINUARÁ.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/briannaeason

I love how dramatic and ominous this sentence is. ...Or was that just how I read it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amir_Moussa

In a similar sentence: "it is impossible to know", i translated as

"Es imposible que saber"

and was marked wrong, with the correction being

"De saber"

Is there a difference between the two or should i report that?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/megann__

why isn't saber conjugated?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OmaJennie

In other discussion threads about 'tener que', several folks have given evidential explanations. If I remember correctly, they generally indicated a translation of "need to" or "must". Until this sentence, Duo has been accepting either "need to" or "must" for 'tener que'. With this sentence, however, Duo is not accepting "need to", but instead wants "has to". I mention this because the first time I came across a sentence on here with 'tener que' + infinitive, I wrote "has to" (infinitive) and Duo dinged it as wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sofiekatz

this needs to be fixed

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

What a strange construction. Maybe it would be used in the sense of, "She has to know (something) for the exam tomorrow", indicating she has a pressing need to know? Or is it more like, she's from this neighborhood, so "She must know" where we can find the closest supermarket?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Not so strange: Her boss is stealing from the company. "She [the assistant] has to know." Her kid is skipping school. "She [mom] has to know." How does the shower turn on? ""She [the maid] has to know." How far is the museum? She [the desk clerk] has to know. Etc.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

Could you give some more examples? I'm not sure I get it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hiteshewa

I think "has/needs" are both correct, coming from a native English speaker

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/juli1717

I think it is the same with spanish... I'm a native spanish speaker

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/apaige22

she needs to know = she doesnt already know the information but it is imperative that someone or through some means she find out.... she has to know = could mean the same or it could mean "she should already know that information...it is unrealistic to think she doesnt already know that information...so which meaning are we to infer from this sentence???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/juli1717

I feel that "has to know" and "need to know" is the same thing!!!!!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_dos
Dan_dos
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There is no contextual difference between "has to" and "needs to" "tener que" indicates a necessity to, which means needs to. When are the duolingo folk going to get their collective heads out that dark place?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfinore
alfinore
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JMoriarty, did you have to ask that question, or did you need to ask that question

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mpaulson44

I wrote 'she should know' it was also marked wrong

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TwoWholeWorms
TwoWholeWorms
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So, why is "She has to taste" not valid?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ninjosh92

I live in a hispanic home. We've always used "tener" for "have to", and "need to". "Necesitar" feels to me like "required to" in that it sounds very proffesional.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eleanora454185

My club code is BPER39. It's lots of fun!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chantellebayes

Why doesn't this sentence require a 'de' before saber? Know is a transitive verb so shouldn't it be 'de saber' (as in 'she has to know it') or is this indicating that there is not a specific thing she has to know (which would be very unusual i would think)?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adog759600

So does "que" also mean "to" or is this a different form of "que"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T_Late
T_Late
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Is there any reason why "She has to know how" is wrong? Saber can mean "to know" and also "to know how." For example, "Yo sé nadar" is correctly translated as "I know how to swim." Would the "to know how" never be used in this specific construction? "She has to know how" was marked wrong Sept. 3, 2017.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DannyGoldstein1

I should be marked correct. In english must and has to has the same meaning

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DannyGoldstein1

Has to and must mean the same. Please mark me as correct!

9 months ago
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