" píosa sa mhála sin."

Translation:There is a piece in that bag.

December 16, 2014

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielNieciecki

A piece of what? A gun?

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niamhwitch

That was my first guess!

January 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaelBeal

Pretty sure 'piece' doesn't translate figuratively. Gun is 'gunna' by the way

August 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coconutlulz

It's a piece of something, not a gun. 'Piece' would not refer to a gun in Ireland.

September 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballycastle

Growing up in Northern Ireland, we referred to a piece of bread and butter or a packed lunch as a piece. So it would be quite normal to put your piece in that bag

January 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vessiecakes

Same here!! I came into this discussion to see if anyone had mentioned that, haha

June 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bryji

She pronounces "mhála" with a 'v' sounds for 'mh' where I would use a 'w' sound. Is this a dialect thing, and if so which dialects do what? (Or am I just completely wrong? :)

February 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Munster does.

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roentgen

Huh. Why is mhála lenited here but I just did a question in which the answer was an mála (not lenited after the definite article).

November 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Mála is a masculine noun - only feminine nouns are lenited after an.

But prepositions change things up. Some generate eclipsis when the definite article is present (ar an mbord), but i becomes sa when the definite article is involved and causes lenition for all nouns, masculine and feminine. (except in Connacht, where they are eclipsed!)

January 24, 2016
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