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"Tu dois citer cet auteur."

Translation:You have to cite this author.

3 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/anonanonano

"You need to cite this author" was not accepted. Impossible. One cannot (or at least should not) quote every author one cites.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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It is accepted now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geoffjball

The elusive citer.

Sometimes I use quote, and Duolingo tells me it should be cite.

Sometimes I use cite, and Duolingo tells me it should be quote.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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When one answer is accepted, it may also give you another correct answer.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gori16

cite is not equal quote I think

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evatenn
evatenn
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What do you mean? In some contexts citing and quoting mean the same thing. In others contexts, "quoting" would be citing a source word for word, using quotation marks, whereas "citing" could also mean expressing the ideas from the cited source in one's own words. If you look up "citer," you will see that it too carries both of these meanings.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevieCham1

You're quite right, Gori16. I might refer to someone's opinion: that is to cite her. I might include what she said: that is to quote her.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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It's not precisely about the different possible meanings of the English words, but the uses of FR "citer". Nevertheless, when one "cites" an author, you may not only quote them but give a specific reference to the publication in which you found the information.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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In the Type what you hear exercise "Tu dois citer cette auteure" was marked wrong. It is actually correct and should be allowed. (There are female authors too!)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I hope you reported it because that is the only way to ensure moderators know to add it to the list of acceptable answers. In particular, your suggestion could work for all exercises, I believe.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I sure did. Sometimes we have to wait for changes, occasionally an error is fixed really quickly. Either way, our volunteer moderators are heroes and heroines.

Yes, it may carry over into other exercises, but of course only if it sounds the same. Theoretically we might hear the difference between cet auteur and cette auteure, but in practice (and depending on the quality of our audio at home) probably not.
And, in this case, they are both "this author" in writing in English. (I'm supposing no-one uses authoress any more.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

When I said it could work for all exercises, I meant all versions of this question. In the translating from English to French exercise "this author" could be either male or female; choosing the correct answer could work for both too. And as you noted, "write what you hear" could work for both genders. Nice catch, I thought.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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"Tu dois citer cette auteure" is the primary alternative to "tu dois citer cet auteur" and has been listed as such for at least ten months. For the "type what you hear" exericise, I added this to the list of homophones in July 2017.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RGL14
RGL14
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Larousse states that citer also means "cite". I've reported it and asked that it be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Citer has a range of interpretations but in this context "cite" is the most direct. It is accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevieCham1

I'm newish. Is there some way of working out what the context of a phrase/sentence is? Does "the most direct" mean "the interpretation which uses a similar-looking word" or something else? In British English, we wouldn't generally use "cite" for "refer to" or "include a reference to": is this a US thing?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Hi, Stevie. The verb citer is defined as: to quote, to name, to cite (Oxford French Dictionary). Any of these words could be used and would make sense in the sentence: tu dois citer cet auteur. So it comes down to making a choice as to which is more natural.

  • "You have to quote that author." That certainly could be if someone is saying you can't just use the author's words without using a quote and giving a reference.
  • "You have to name that author." Same issue: you should not use the author's words without naming him/her.
  • "You have to cite this author." It keeps the same sense in the use of "cite" as the original, and well, it happens to be an easy one to remember.

When I said "cite" is the most direct, I don't mean that it is any better a translation. Sometimes the look-alike words are actually wrong. But here it's fine.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lemmo
Lemmo
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Where is the t in cet coming from?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Cet is the demonstrative adjective before a masculine word beginning with a vowel.

You would know this if before starting a section on the French tree, you would log onto Duolingo on a PC and read the Tips and Notes under the lessons. Here is a link to the notes at the start of this section (You will need to scroll down to see them): https://www.duolingo.com/skill/fr/Demonstratives-1

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oktorockto

Cette, ca, ci, ces does anyone have a good guide for these?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drmel94
drmel94
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"You have to quote this author" should be accepted. In the absence of context, there's no particular reason to impute or assume "to cite" as the sole possible interpretation "citer" here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fr_Aug6

I wrote, "you should cite this author." Not accepted. Is dois not the same as should?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drmel94
drmel94
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Throughout this course and as far as I can find, devoir generally implies duty, something one must do. According to Larousse online, it can mean should, but that appears to apply only in the conditional form - e.g., "Tu devrais". http://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais-anglais/devoir/24917

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andy959366
Andy959366
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I have always used cite as to criticise

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Then you've been using it erroneously. When cite isn't used to mean to quote or to provide proof of something, then it means to praise, which is the complete opposite of to criticize.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevieCham1

Andy, in the UK, "cite" would be used to refer to something. So you might cite an author, or a source. You can cite a person, but that would often be for a purpose - for a bravery award, or for a penalty (I think, principally in the US?).

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HughOReilly1

So what is the french for: "You SHOULD cite/mention this author." Thanks

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanetBerry2

I prefer to use must Its a bit more refined than have to

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Qiset1
Qiset1
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duolingo was wrong. I didn't type it in english, just mispell the last word.

2 weeks ago