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"She did not allow me."

Translation:Ella no me lo permitió.

0
5 years ago

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Leslie_Duo

Why is the "lo" required in this sentence? No entiendo.

122
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thearifeldman

I got this wrong and have been prying around trying to find an answer. Just a guess, but I think "permitio" requires a direct object - something has to be allowed. The "lo" is an abstract "it." In other words, the English equivalent is really, "She did not allow me to do it."

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Reply25 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leslie_Duo

Gracias, thearifeldman. Creo que LO entiendo, jaja. :)

29
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarilynVan2

So "me" is adverbial modifier of the object?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I believe ''me'' is the indirect object pronoun and ''lo'' is the direct object pronoun. ''Ella'' is the subject of the verb ''Permitir.'' Nothing is modified in this sentence. The direct object as explained above is an abstract "it". She did not allow me (to do it)

If it had been "She did not allow me to do it well" or Ella no me lo permitió bien."then "well"/bien" would be a modifier of how it was allowed to be done..

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Right jmiker54. Also, the indirect object pronoun (me) is always placed before the direct object pronoun (lo). And as thearifeldman said, since "permitir" is a transitive verb, it requires a direct object, although in this case it is a "dummy" pronoun (lo).

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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Yes this is true, but to be clear the direct object does not have to be a DO Pronoun. A transitive verb is a verb that requires something to take its action. You permit or allow 'something' you bounce a 'ball' Permit allow and bounce are all transitive verbs.

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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mokurdi
mokurdi
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I get your point. But the fact the english sentence does not have it explicitly. Also in the correct answers there are two options. The first one (me dejo) does not have the lo.

• Ella no me dejó. • Ella no me lo permitió.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

In «Ella no me dejo"» "me" is the DIRECT object. "She does not let me"

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Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuudHier

This is exactly the point where Duolingo fails for me: I've been seeing these constuctions for weeks now and I still don't know when to use them and when not to use them. Maybe after doing it wrong for the 1000th time I'll know, because that's the way Duolingo teaches us, I guess...

25
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/estevekim

Duolingo unfortunately isn't in the business of teaching users proper grammatical Spanish. It's in the business of translating content for its clients via a crowdsourcing model, which means that we (those who actually want to learn proper Spanish) are at the mercy of anyone from Manuela, a PhD in Spanish Education in Buenos Aires, to Kenji, a four-year-old in Osaka with his dad's Spanish dictionary in hand. Caveat emptor.

Duolingo, Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duolingo.

14
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RageHole

It is a drawback and we should beware, but then again we aren't buyers. For a free service I still think it is pretty helpful. Duolingo is great for vocabulary, but I think the best next step for polishing grammar would be immersion--exposing oneself to lots of spanish news, television, and conversation.

59
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sirusjr

I find the best option is to use something like Lingq to expose yourself to Spanish sentences in context. If you use it right you don't have to pay anything and still get a lot of useful lessons from there.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/llibllens

Yes caveat emptor. And remember exactly how much we as buyers paid for this course. Still I like it because it's a lot like immersing myself in the language in a foreign country. You learn from every speaker how to communicate. Some have good grammer most do not. You learn from everyone. Not always perfect grammar but how to communicate with everyone

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Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReubenHolc

Couldn't agree more. Whatever its shortcomings, this is an excellent course. It's free, and it is so much better than a lot of other courses around. The strengthening feature is superb and aligns with theories about how information is committed to the long-term memory.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A1fie
A1fie
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Duolingo model works for me. You learn structures like how a toddler would learn, by imitation and repetation. I can polish my grammar later.

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

RuudHier, I felt the same way, but recently I've started doing the premium account grammar exercises at Studyspanish.com along with doing Duolingo. I think this will help a lot. Maybe that would help you and others, too, who want more structure and teaching.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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I think it has to do with the sentence being negative, but I have not found the rule. Maybe a Spanish speaker will come along and explain it.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/profhoff

Right on!

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elcapitan009

12 Oct 2017 "Ella no me permitio" was accepted

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Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Riickiie

Yo tampoco

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Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatricioJiang

I am thinking that the "lo" is the direct object pronoun for the unspoken "it" that was not permitted. "She no me it permitted".

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amazed1499
amazed1499
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Where is the "it"?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatricioJiang

The action that was not allowed, that action is "it[lo]".

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/circumbendibus
circumbendibus
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Spanish is not English, so it will not always translate exactly. As everyone just said, Spanish 'permitió' requires 'lo', but English 'allowed' does not always require 'it'.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZugTheMegasaurus

Think of when you would you use this sentence. It's nonsensical on its own; you'd probably be saying it if someone asked you if you had done something. "Did you go to the mall?" "She didn't let me." So even though you're not explicitly saying what the "it" is, you can still tell that there's something being talked about.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Beez
Dr.Beez
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I don't get this construction. It looks like Subject/Ind Obj/Dir Obj/Verb, which I've never seen before. Why doesn't "Ella no me permitió" work?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

When you're using the object pronouns, both direct (the ones that include lo/la) and indirect (which include le), they end up either before the verb, or (if you're using an infinite or a present progressive) glued onto the end of the verb.

And it's apparently "Ella no me lo permitió" because the verb is obligatorily transitive; it must have some object, even if it's something abstract. You could also say, "Ella no me permitió eso," using the abstract "that". "Lo" is about the most minimal object you can find.

Interestingly, this site suggests translating "countenance" as "permitir". http://www.spanishcentral.com/translate/countenance

And "countenance" is that rare example of a verb that is obligatorily transitive in English. A lot of the time, even if a verb strongly implies an object (or both a direct and indirect object), we can get away with leaving it unspoken. So, you can say, "I gave at the office." "That dog bites." "We ate."

But you really can't say, "He countenances." You'd have to add an object, like "something" or "it" or "this".

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Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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You've really never seen it before? It is absolutely standard sentence construction. Spanish is pretty flexible but this seems mandatory. Of course a pronoun subject will often not be necessary. Te lo digo = I tell you it (i.e. it to you); me lo manda = he sends it to me, etc. The personal pronoun always goes first. Look out for the indirect pronoun "le" changing to "se" before "lo" to stop the two Ls being sounded - hence se lo mando = I send it to him not the expected le lo.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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A good way to remember the order of pronouns is to use 'RID' where R = Reflexive Pronouns, I = Indirect Object Pronouns, an D = Direct Object Prnouns. The pronouns will always be placed in this order.

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Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

It isn't mandatory! There is the sentence, "No me digas!" (¡You don't say!) that does very well without the "lo," thank you very much ;=). Anyway, "Ella no me permitió" is now accepted, which gives one hope that somebody among the Spanish Duolords is finally paying attention!

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/applesqueeze

notwithstanding the bulk of the conversation in this thread, I also did not use "lo" (never even occurred to me) and DL marked it as correct - so it could be that DL has made a correction?

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistakenolive

As did I. They must've

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fire-Horse27
Fire-Horse27
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Didn't happen with me.

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Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoarieG

Because of the wonderful Comment Section here I have learned to use great outside resources such as: http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/dopro1.htm on DO Pronouns to supplement DL. Every mistake forces me to ask why and challenges me to learn rather then memorize. Maybe this link on Direct Object Pronouns may help.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HomesickTourist

Why both "me" and "lo" used before the verb?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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Me is the IO, and the understood 'it' or lo is the DO read the posts above.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JulietteIris

What if I really am not allowed? Like, she just did not want me? How does that work? Or do I have to assume I'm doing something?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I don't understand your question.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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JulietteIris probably means "I am not allowed" in the same sense as "Dogs are not allowed" is used. In this case, there is a clause hidden and not mentioned ("to enter" or something like that) in English. If anything special happens in these cases in Spanish, I don't know.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mdecoster
mdecoster
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I just used "dejar" which does not require the object.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sarizzle

Why is it ¨Ella no me lo permitió¨ and not ¨Ella me no permitio¨? I don´t understand why the no and me get reversed in certain situations. Thanks!

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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Me is an IO in this sentence and you always put the objects (reflexive, idirect object, direct object And always in that order) directly in front of the verb.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

And, "no" comes before the pronouns.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JBW.
JBW.
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The five words that every married Spanish man has spoken before...

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lonemohsin

Perhaps duolingo is the best language app. Its just the matter of understanding it properly. "lo" here used can/cannot be used. its a choice. i didn't use lo here and was still marked correct. To be precise, lo here means "to it", that's, permitted me to do it. Without lo, it would be, " She didn't allow me". What i mean is that duolingo gives opportunity to learn both- with using lo and without lo in a single sentence when both of 'em are correct, only the difference is the matter of precision.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/capellantanguero

Mavry has pointed out that "Ella no me permitió" is incorrect. "permitir" needs an object.

We must remember that <accecpted by Duolingo> does not guarantee that the usage is correct. Duolingo can change it's mind about whether something is acceptable, based on input from users like you and me. This sometimes leads to situations where an answer is not accepted, then accepted, then not accepted, etc., This is somewhat akin to watching the reporting of election results in a close race, i.e. first one candidate is ahead, then a different candidate, then the first candidate, etc. Duolingo seems to resolve this situation by sometimes accepting both usages, as if they were equally correct, when in fact one may be the correct usage according to the RAE, while the other is incorrect but commonly used.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Silk_Oak

I translated "She did not allow me," as "Ella no me permitió" but did not put in the 'lo.' Duolingo used this "Ella no me dejó" as the right way to translate the sentence, which doesn't make any sense. 'dejó' means left. Is this a report a problem situation, or was this another way I didn't know about of translating this sentence?

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Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/promcesanancy

Yes, I fear it does not make sense to have to have the lo but there is a rule somewhere I am sure.

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goodwilhealthy

Can't use permitame?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I think since the verb must be conjugated you must pur the articles before the verb. Also the verb is permitir.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbarasmussen

Couldn't it be "No me permitió a mí"

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken.goodwi

According to DL's correct translation i was given lo is not there.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cyrano5
cyrano5
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i got the English as the problem, and got it wrong, but the CORRECT version does not have 'lo! This may mean it is optional. Mods, please check because we are confused.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut1
rooseveltnut1Plus
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I put she did not allow me it. Got it wrong...??????

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I think if you had put "She did not allow me to do it" they may have accepted that but with out the 'do' it would be wrong . The 'it' part or the 'lo' is the direct object but you cannot just plop it out there (the it) in this translation by itself. Sometimes the 'it' alone will work but not here.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fredricksonjim

Why does the order have to be "me lo" and why not "lo me"?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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You always must order object pronouns, Reflexive (R) first Indirect Object (I) second and Direct Object (D) third.Just Remember the Acronym RID so you can have a RD or a ID or an RI but never a DI It is just a rule, I guess so there is no confusion about what someone is saying, Just remember RID. Reflexive, IO, DO.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fredricksonjim

Thanks!

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Reply3 years ago