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"¿Quién viene conmigo?"

Translation:Who is coming with me?

5 years ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sigwald
Sigwald
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Why is "Who arrives with me?" wrong here?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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llegar = to arrive

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZechariahDLS

In that case the dictionary hint might need changing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
feyMorgaina
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I spaced and completely forgot the number one rule of DuoLingo - don't trust the hints! ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vluthra

Shouldn't "who is coming with me" be "Quie'n va a venir conmigo"; the literal translation...who is going to come with me. This should have been "Who comes with me" but that was not accepted, can someone please explain...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Papageorgioq123

"Quien viene conmigo?" - Gerado Maguire

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selva_es_Enorme

"me completAS" - Cheri Magüalla

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coximus22
coximus22
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"Dorothea Boyd, Gracias!"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GringoAmistoso

lol you can't translate his name but you get an upvote and a lingot anyway

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelJame12
SamuelJame12
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¿Quién viene conmigo?... Jan! Gracias, Jan. Vaminos! ¿Jan, tienes un novio?... No, soy lesbe. ¿Qué es eso como?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

VENIR vs. LLEGAR? Gets confusing. I understand LLEGAR means "to arrive/come", but I thought VENIR means "to come from" a particular destination/origin. If im correct than shouldnt the truest verb for the above sample sentence be LLEGAR? Ex. "Who comes/arrives with me." Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diana.ame
diana.ame
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If the sentence was 'Who arrives with me?' in spanish it'd be '¿Quién llega conmigo?'. In that case you are asking who is going to arrive with you to a certain destination, you both (or more people) are all going to the same place. For ex., when you're going to a party but you don't wanna arrive alone, so you ask your friends: ¿Quién llega conmigo?. Now, '¿Quién viene conmigo?' absolutely is 'Who is coming with me?', it's more focused on the fact that you're asking someone to accompany you rather than to arrive with you to a certain place. For ex., if you've got a car and you're leaving the party, you tell your friends you live nearby <x> avenue, so you ask '¿Quién viene conmigo?' - that means they are going to accompany you for a certain while of the trip, but they're not arriving with you to your house! Unless you're taking someone home, in which case you'd ask her/him '¿Vienes conmigo?' (Are you coming with me?)... I mean, you could also use '¿Quién viene conmigo?'/'¿Quién llega conmigo?' to make a trip with people to a shared destination, but the first one is much more used, while the question '¿Quién llega conmigo?' is actually really rarely used.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tan10sha
tan10sha
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So, one of the tips says that "venir" might mean "to arrive", Is there an example for it? From what I read above it is just a wrong and confusing tip.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diana.ame
diana.ame
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I just saw that the translation from duolingo writes 'viene' as 'arrive' o 'arrives', and yeah, that seems wrong to me. 'Llegar' would be to arrive, while 'venir' would be to come. Is it still confusing??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tan10sha
tan10sha
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Thank you. I understand the difference and everything. I'm just pissed that I had to learn it through losing the heart because of the wrong tip. I hope whoever is in charge of duolingo tips will read this thread and correct the tip.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diana.ame
diana.ame
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Alright, I'm glad my explanation worked. Yep, losing hearts for no good reason hurts haha, good luck then.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmigs

Conmigo? First time I've seen this on DL. Can someone explain this term? Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewduo
andrewduo
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Easiest just to ignore the "go" and think of it as "con" + "mi" = with me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Atokirina

I wonder why did they add go at the end?...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tresakon

Spanish combines 'with' and 'me' into conmigo and 'with' and 'you' as contigo. Occasionally, you will hear 'consigo', but usually it is 'con Ud.' I learned the conmigo by thinking that an 'amigo' was going with me. Lame, but I needed all the help I could get.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gom8z

If there is no need for the go. I wonder why they don't improve their language

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iamihop

"Who is coming with me" is not present tense - it's present progressive, but is always used in place of "who is going to come with me?" making it a sort of de facto future tense. Is this really the meaning of this question in Spanish, or does it mean "who currently comes with me?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewduo
andrewduo
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Why is this singular? I would have thought the question was being directed to multiple people, so should be "vienen".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"who" (quien) takes a singular subject in this sentence. There is also a plural form of quienes. The speaker must have expected that one person was coming with him or her, so the wording is singular. If he thought more than one person was to come, the plural Quienes vienen would have been used.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob20020
Bob20020
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What about others? "contugo"? "conelgo"? (just guesses)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesDain

There is one other. Contigo-with you (informal)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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There is one other: consigo - with himself, herself, itself, themselves, yourself (formal), yourselves.

It's based on , which is the reflexive prepositional pronoun for the 3rd persons. "Ellos lo hizo para sí" - "They did it for themselves."

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pokemon___Master

why can't it be who coming with me

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You need a conjugated verb in your sentence. "Who comes with me?" or "Who is coming with me?"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dev549734

I'm not gonna do what everyone thinks I'm gonna do..... flip out man!!! I just got one question....

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrea34317

I said "who is going with me" shouldn't that be right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Meaning-wise it would be close enough, but translation-wise it's not.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattgsy
mattgsy
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Is someone able to please explain why "go" is used in "conmigo/contigo"? I understand the "con"+"mi/ti" but not sure I understand why "go" is added! Thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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According to the respective RAE entries they derive from a preposition doubling. The Latin words "mecum" and "tecum" mean "with me" and "with you", respectively, but since Spanish doesn't do postpositional prepositions, they added the con before those words. And over time they derived into conmigo and contigo.

There's no grammatical reason for those special forms, just a habit from olden times.

Edit: I just learnt that vulgar Latin already used the phrases "cum mecum" and "cum tecum". So the Romans are to blame, like most of the time. :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeccaM52805

i forgot to put a question mark -_-

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaylynJenk1

It's who is coming with me

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GringoAmistoso

I picture the Half Baked parody of this scene when I hear that line.

7 months ago