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"Llevé mi cámara conmigo."

Translation:I took my camera with me.

5 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/paradocapintero

"I brought my camera with me" doesn't work here??

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Spanish is sometimes fussy about coming/going and taking/bringing. to bring is 'traer. In the US folks use take/bring interchangeably, even though purists will say you take things to a place and bring things from a place. The sentence here is taking your camera to a place.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Citizencase

This is really interesting. I thought that "bringing" wine with me when I arrive at a party, for example, would emphasize (or be emphasized by) the destination, and "taking" wine with me upon leaving my house would underscore the notion of removing it from my home. When I think of swapping these words in this context, they obviously make mo sense. I guess I just need to remember to switch the connotations in my mind when speaking Spanish until it sticks subconsciously?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/niperwiper

I never knew there was a difference between taking and bringing like that! Huh!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/efdfirefighter20

Best I can contribute here is context. When You "take" something, the emphasis is on the location from where it was removed. It does not matter where it ends up. When you "bring" something, the location of where it ends up matters more. Where it came from is irrelevant. Although you can "take it to the limit" or "bring it from home", I was taught that when in doubt, You "take" from and "bring" to. Hope this helps.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisseth.M
Lisseth.M
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Took -> llevé Brought -> traje You can say "traje" when you for example go to a party and you bring something, and it's with you but won't be only for you, "Traje un pastel", you will share it, but "llevé" is when it will stay with you until the end, like "Yo llevé mi cámara al viaje" .

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnHarvey592920

I used the word "carry" and it was counted wrong

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/charliemegaman

carried?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineAnn

I said "I carried my camera with me." It was accepted on Google translate.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadameJoan

Duolingo didn't accept it for me either. But I will report it and perhaps they'll reconsider.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Nov 21 2013 - Carry is still not accepted. I found "carry" in my dictionary but I will assume that despite that generally speaking spanish natives don't use it in this context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marliner

Agreed, it should be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisseth.M
Lisseth.M
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Carry is when you literally are carrying something weight in your arms or in your back, like someone, in Spanish carry is "cargar"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sadiqu

Hi guys, I think I understand when to use 'igo' for example conmigo and contigo. However I still don't understand the relevance of igo. Would appreciate anybody able to explain. Thanks :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rchassereau

It looks like the tigo, migo, and sigo (and others) all stem from latin.

Source: http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Spanish_prepositions#/con

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nicole942077

But why wouldn't you just say "con mi"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisseth.M
Lisseth.M
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Because "mi" is used only for things that are yours, like "mi" means "mine": Mi amigo, mi cámara.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nishq

Feb 2014 - 'Carried' still not accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adif
adif
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Carried is accepted now (Mar. 2014)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noddie2

When do people use more llevar and when more tomar?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisseth.M
Lisseth.M
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Took -> llevé Brought -> traje You can say "traje" when you for example go to a party and you bring something, and it's with you but won't be only for you, "Traje un pastel", you will share it, but "llevé" is when it will stay with you until the end, like "Yo llevé mi cámara al viaje"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerdfy

Why isn't this accepted? "i take my camera with me"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cardano
Cardano
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The verb in this example, Llevé, is in the past tense. In your translation, take is in the present tense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisseth.M
Lisseth.M
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Take -> llevar Took -> llevé

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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I take = llevo; to take = llevar

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

Why isn't 'Yo' in the beginning of this sentence?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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It isn't necessary to put a subject pronoun in front of a verb, unless for emphasis or clarification.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/george.qiao

Are tomar and llevar interchangeable?

1 year ago