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  5. "Min kropp är mitt palats."

"Min kropp är mitt palats."

Translation:My body is my palace.

December 18, 2014

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TMUM4

Idiomatically, in English you would say 'My body is my temple.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

In Swedish too, so this is not an idiomatic expression, rather it seems like a reaction to the usual saying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelKop11

Interesting. Never heard of that. It is a bit like "my home is my castle".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

… which is usually said as Mitt hem är min borg in Swedish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

I've never actually heard "My body is my temple", but it clearly stems from the Bible which teaches that Christian bodies are "temples of the Holy Spirit."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lilkender

Yes, that's exactly where the English phrase is from. I mostly heard it in church.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patty13647

It's also used when considering what your diet is doing to your health.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skyjo77

Min kropp är ett tempel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/se_pietari

In Swedish, would it be more common to say "Min kropp är mitt palats" or "Kroppen är mitt palats"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Min kropp. I don't know why it sounds better here, but it does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pierreloup19

Min kropp as you specify thar it's your body and not the human body in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SFTFTime16

Why not "castle"?? Is it also the same as " palace" isn't it??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Almost the same, at least. I'll add it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vithralas

Wow, when I saw the question, I would never expect to have read this answer, hahahahahahaha.

Just to add a little bit of information about this (it's not a complain, I just would like to share it, because I found it interesting):

The word ‘castle’ comes from the Anglo-Norman French word ‘castel‘, which itself derives from the Latin word meaning ‘fort’. A castle is a fortified dwelling. In other words, there are many kinds of fortifications built for defense, but a castle is specifically used as a residence, as well. In medieval times, castles were usually occupied by someone highborn, such as a lord, knight or monarch. (Shown here is Bodium Castle, England.)

The term ‘palace’ comes from Rome’s Palatine Hill, where the rich and famous built their sumptuous homes in Roman times. So when we’re wondering what’s the difference between a castle and a palace, the most important difference is that a palace is not fortified.

https://www.familyhandyman.com/smart-homeowner/difference-between-castle-and-palace/

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