"Buailimid leat."

Translation:We meet with you.

3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Is this why some Americans say they are going to hit someone up when going to meet someone?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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I can’t speak for people who are younger than I am, but my use of “to hit someone up” is “to make a request of someone”, e.g. “I hit him up for a donation to the Cancer Society”.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

Not sure. Here is the etymology of 'hit', according to Wiktionary:

From Middle English hitten ‎(“to hit, strike, make contact with”), from Old English hittan ‎(“to meet with, come upon, fall in with”), probably of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse hitta ‎(“to strike, meet”), from Proto-Germanic hitjaną ‎(“to come upon, find”), from Proto-Indo-European keyd- ‎(“to fall, fall upon”). Cognate with Icelandic hitta ‎(“to meet”), Danish hitte ‎(“to find”), Latin caedō ‎(“fall”), Albanian qit ‎(“to hit, throw, pull out, release”).

It only has this to say about 'buail':

From Old Irish búailid.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gp6am
Gp6am
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Well, Americans do use "bump into" or "run into" when we talk about meeting someone we already know at an unexpected time or place. Example: "You'll never guess who I bumped into at the station;" "How lucky that we ran into each other today." It indicates the meeting was a surprise or coincidence. We wouldn't use it if the meeting had been planned.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rewjeo
Rewjeo
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Can this be meet in the sense of meeting someone for the first time, or only in the sense of to meet with someone?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alibax
alibax
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It worked when I entered "we meet you, " so in guessing it can be either, but it's a guess/extrapolation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

This has always bothered me. How do you get a four word sentence out of just two words?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Buail+muid le+tú. You have two compound words in Irish, which break down to match the 4 words in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

Ah ha!! That's how it works. I never had compound words explained. I learned this from age 5 until about 11. Not formal teaching, just what my family taught me. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GertWall
GertWall
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We meet with you. Why don't we need leis, lei or le here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kevmur
kevmur
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Also, note that 'buail + le' means 'meet' but 'buail' with no preposition means 'hit'.

There's a very important difference between 'Buailimid leis an páiste' and 'Buailimid an páiste'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Leat is le + tú.

You only need le for the person you are meeting with. The "we" is covered in the verb.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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Is ‘we meet you’ accepted too?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kevmur
kevmur
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Yes. The preposition is optional in English, but omitting the preposition in Irish would completely change the meaning of the sentence. 'Buailimid tú' would mean 'we hit you'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demazema

do my ears deceive me or does the speaker say the verb more like "buailaimid"? is that how it is supposed to be pronounced?

3 years ago
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