"Cheannaigh sé crann nua agus chuir sé é sa ghairdín."

Translation:He bought a new tree and he put it in the garden.

4 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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The 'é' would be more usually placed at the end of the sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonDunne2

Is planted ok as well? Also wondering in Irish if there is any difference in the nuance of put and plant or are they synonymous? For example in English there is a difference in he puts a book on the table or he plants a potato but in Irish cuireann sé leabhar ar an mbord nó cuireann sé práta use the same verb. In other words, in the Gaeilgeoir's mind would he plants a book on the table or he puts a potato translate identically ( besides of course the two different actions)?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

"Planted" is OK as well, and should have been accepted as a correct answer.

The entry for cuir in the FoclóirGaeilge-Béarla actually starts with "sow/plant" and works its way on to "put". It's worth reading to see the many different ways that cuir is used n Irish, some of which seem straightforward enough if you think of cuir as "put", some of which clearly don't, which suggests that, for the native speaker, "put" isn't the basic meaning of cuir, even though that's the meaning that most learners probably encounter first.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonDunne2

Thanks for the link Satharn. I would guess that phrases like duine a chur and baoi a chur must have different nuances. To plant a person seems a bit grim, I can see why bury is the better option however I am thinking that to put and to plant are synonymous in the native mind. I am not sure if they visualise and see them as two different things. I suppose an example in English of using the same verb with different nuances would be along the lines of I drive my car 250 metres or I drive a golf ball 250 metres, both using to drive, but we would definitely visualise and interpret the same word differently.

6 months ago
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