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"No todos han comido hoy."

Translation:Not everybody has eaten today.

5 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/yaosha
yaosha
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Does this mean at least part of the group didn't eat while others may have eaten? Or does it mean nobody ate?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah.Kerr

Some have, some haven't.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maudbenoit

In DL the "no" must be at the beginning of the sentence. So how does one say ..".not everybody has" ( therefore some have) versus "everybody has not eaten" (no food consumed).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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I am not sure what you mean by

the "no" must be at the beginning of the sentence

because not only is that not true of duolingo, it suggests that you think moving the no is possible or necessary in this sentence to change the partitive. That would be wrong.

But, to answer the partitive vs entirety question:

  • No todo ha comido hoy = Not everyone

  • Nadie ha comido hoy = Not one

  • Sólo he comido hoy = Only I

  • La mitad ha comido hoy = Half

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric427702

Thanks for the info Alphonse

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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maudbenoit, I second your question. However, my guess is that no would directly precede the verb if no one had eaten. "Todos no han comido."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michaeldressner
michaeldressner
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To "have had food" in English is the equivalent to "have eaten".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria696768
Maria696768
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Everyone should be accepted

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danisaidman
danisaidman
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why the answer is "has" if it is "They"? it shouldn't be "Have"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Everybody takes a singular verb, even though the noun represents multiple people. For example: Everyone IS invited to the party. or Everybody IS going to the beach. And in this sentence on Duolingo: Not everybody HAS eaten.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Maybe it depends on one's version of English. In USA team is, in UK team are.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danisaidman
danisaidman
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Really?...that make the things more difficult for everyone.....que se puede hacer? Thanks amte for the answer.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/latergator

It is borderline idiomatic. In the English the plural is conveyed in "everybody" but it is not customary to use "have" with it, go figure. Has" is more convention than correct. Otherwise English is perfect. Wanna buy a bridge? I defer to rspreng

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikLearnSpanish

"Not everybody has eaten today" is correct. But "Everybody has not eaten today" is wrong??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken.goodwi

Not everybody has eaten today and Everybody has not eaten today (which is what I thought it was) do not have the same meaning. One says some but not all have eaten today while the second says no one has eaten today. I think the placement of no with the previous forms gave me the idea here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keithauclair

I'm sorry. This is incorrect. The two sentences mean the exact same thing in English. There is no notion of each and every person not doing something expressed by everyone has not done whatever. That would be expressed as "Nobody has eaten" not "Everyone has not eaten." Everyone refers to the entire group, so if one person hasn't eaten, then everyone hasn't eaten.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RedwoodsHermit
RedwoodsHermit
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I seriously can't understand why keithauclair's comment is being marked up and ken's is marked down, lol?? Ken.goodwi is absolutely correct here.

"Not everybody has eaten today" = less than or equal to 100% of people have not eaten today (but this usage usually would imply at least one person has eaten).

"Everybody has not eaten today" = 100% of people have not eaten today.

The only exception to this would be if you were answering the implicit question "has everybody eaten today?", in which case the speaker would shift speaking emphasis to "not." Even in this case it isn't identical to the first sentence because it becomes dependent on a question.

Where you place the negative impacts the sentence in this example. You need to revisit elementary level English if you think these sentences mean the exact same thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken.goodwi

nothing to be sorry about here, it is all about perception, yes, everybody or everyone refers to the entire group. I think we can both agree on that correct? think of it this way.. the entire group has eaten. the entire group has not eaten? did they eat and did they not eat? the entire group has eaten. not the entire group has eaten. did they eat? did some eat? Perhaps a school grade is on a field trip and was too busy at the museum. The teachers forgot all about stopping for lunch break. At the end of the day the teacher asks has everyone eaten today? No, everyone has not eaten today. Perhaps they did stop for a quick lunch...Has everyone eaten today? No, not everyone has eaten.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bnHYmhgS

Duolingo said I'd left the last word of the above sentence off, but I hadn't finished writing. Annoying.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eddison700336

Everybody is singular, han comido is plural.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I agree, but everybody can be translated to todos.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DotDotDotD
DotDotDotD
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"Everyone has not eaten today. " Why is this wrong? THANKS

6 months ago