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"The season begins in September."

Translation:La temporada empieza en septiembre.

5 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nomadminded

Is there any important difference between "empieza" and "comienza"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivanka_ps
Ivanka_ps
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I'm a native Spanish speaker and I don't see any difference. Empezar= comenzar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArchitOjha
ArchitOjha
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Comienza - starts Empieza - begins

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Doesn't look like it, outside of phrases - the RAE has comenzar as a synonym for empezar. http://lema.rae.es/drae/srv/search?val=comenzar

Most of the other meanings of 'start' in English seem to be handled by different verbs, like starting a car (encender):
http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=start

But going a bit further, when you get into things like comienzo ('beginning' as a noun), it's only certain places that use words derived from empezar - like I can see dictionary references saying empiece is a Latin American/colloquial version, and empiezo is used in Honduras. But for the verbs in general, the nuances are probably way beyond us at this point! Here's some Spanish-speakers talking about it:
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=739060

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s9csbaum

Why is "en el septiembre" wrong here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cjmcdonald1

I have the same question. If/when it gets explained I think it'll be a head-slap moment, but I'm OK with that, haha.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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The season begins in the September....tell me if that sounds right. ;) No article needed here, which is why it's wrong. Just the month will do.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cjmcdonald1

Thanks for the explanation. I hate playing dumb, but sometimes it gets the best answers. Counter-point(?): I have a different sentence/interaction to ponder:

"¿Qué hora es?",...."Es la una (menos cuarto)"

"It's THE one (minus quarter)"? This doesn't sound correct, yet it is (if I'm not embarrassingly mistaken). Thanks!

(BTW, how did you bold "the" in your reply? Moderator privilege? haha)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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I don't like that strategy. ;)

That's completely correct, good sir (the Spanish part).

The English translation is: It's a quarter till one. I bold with two asterisks on either side of whatever I am typing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cjmcdonald1

Right...I understand how it actual translates. Since it's correct, I'm then using it to ask why the "la" before una is correct, yet, with the Spanish sentence this discussion concerns, "el" is not correct before septiembre. Thanks!

BOLD!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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Well, they aren't the same thing. Hours always use articles in Spanish, just the way it is. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cjmcdonald1

Fine!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Months apparently don't take a definite article, unless you're talking about a specific date. And as far as I'm aware, you'd drop the en and only use el, because when you say en septiembre it translates as something like "in September" - if you narrow that do a specific date:

en el 1 de septiembre
en still has that 'in' feeling - it doesn't change to mean on and complement the specific date, it kinda gets in the way. So you just drop it:

el 1 de septiembre
Bingo!

Also when it comes to using articles or not, I don't think it's useful to compare to English as a rule - sometimes it happens to work the same, other times no. Better to learn the general Spanish rules and their exceptions, and if you can apply any of that to English to help you remember, great!
There's some stuff here:
http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/a/use_def_art.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZingAna

Temporada and tiempo whats the difference ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kiki9949
kiki9949
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Does anyone know the difference between "la temporada" and "el estación"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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These might help:
http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/seasons

It seems like estación is used more for the named seasons (spring, summer etc.) and temporada is usually more about a period of time, including things like the time of the year when vegetables are 'in season', things like sporting seasons and so on.

It looks like there's a bit of crossover, like being able to use estación for 'the rainy season', so maybe estación has more of an official seasons/climate phases sense. Temporada is a more general period of time (it's in the name, temporal, see?). But one of the RAE's definitions of estación is:
2. f. Tiempo, temporada. En la estación presente.

so it looks like it's pretty good for general sentences anywhere! And here's temporada:
1. f. Espacio de varios días, meses o años que se consideran aparte formando un conjunto. Temporada de verano, de nieves. La mejor temporada de mi vida.

So there in bold, temporada referring to the summer. So really, it seems to be more about convention. I'd go with estación for spring etc. and temporada for anything else, seems the safest bet until you can get clever about it!

Also be careful, it's la estación. Words ending in ción are always feminine (any exceptions?), and always have that accent on the o. When you see ción, think la!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyJ_xx

So annoyinggggg

2 years ago