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https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger

Necesito una explicación de esta frase

CharmingTiger
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I just got this answer wrong while doing timed exercises in the Modal skill.

The children wanted to walk in the street.

"Las niñas querían caminar en la calle."

"Las niñas quisieron caminar en la calle."


Can someone explain why both of these are correct?


3 years ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ilmarien
Ilmarien
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It'd depend on the context. I'm not that great with preterit vs. imperfect, but I usually default to imperfect with words like querer, saber, or poder. Wanting, knowing, and being able to do something aren't normally the sort of verbs where you have one clear and completed action. "Me gustaba ese vestido y quería comprarlo."

I would use the preterit for something specific like "Esa mañana, quise hacer algo, pero no pude," though. That feels more time limited to me.

I doubt I'm doing it 100% correctly, though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mandyturtle

I think your explanation is great. my boyfriend (who is a native speaker) almost always corrects me when I use querer in the preterite. for example if I say something like ayer quise comer tanta comida. he'll ask me ¿querías comer tanta?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Google Translate agrees: https://translate.google.com/?hl=en#auto/en/%22Las%20ni%C3%B1as%20quer%C3%ADan%20caminar%20en%20la%20calle.%22%0A%0A%22Las%20ni%C3%B1as%20quisieron%20caminar%20en%20la%20calle.%22

I want to find the infinitive to check the conjugations: http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/to%20want%20to

I checked the past and found two past tenses in use: http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/%20wanted%20to

Ahhh! Here it is the Simple Pefect Past tense "Préterito Perfecto Simple" and the Imperfect Past tense "Préterito Imperfecto": http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-spanish-verb-querer.html

When do we use each: http://spanish.about.com/od/verbtenses/a/two_past_tenses.htm They call the "Préterito Perfecto Simple" just "Préterito" or "Preterit" and the "Préterito Imperfecto" just "Imperfect", but they have many pages of explanation that are really helpful. Be sure to scroll down to get all the information and these are just the simple past tenses.

You might not always want to walk in the street, it is not safe. So maybe they wanted to, but then they knew better. Then the action was completed and if it had a clear ending it would use Preterit. On the other hand, they might have wanted to walk in the streets on many occasions or for years before they realized that it might not be the best place to walk and then you would use Imperfect. However, there are a lot more reasons to use one or the other and sometimes they are both used in the same sentence. So please check the link for the many reasons.

English has only one simple past tense "Preterite" . http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-english-verb-want.html

You might think that we have an English past continuous form, but - be careful- Spanish has progressive forms also a Preterit progressive and an Imperfect progressive for the past. http://spanish.about.com/od/conjugation/a/progressiveverb.htm

English has 4 compound past tenses, but Spanish has again more, 6. http://spanish.about.com/od/verbtenses/a/compound-past-tenses.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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Wow! You have really done your homework on this one. I had no idea there were that many forms and tenses! I was very impressed. Okay, I must (or owe to - deber) stop speaking in past tense now. ¡Muchas gracias!

3 years ago