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  5. "Ella da agua."

"Ella da agua."

Translation:She gives water.

July 18, 2013

158 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/profhoff

POORLY enunciated. I listened 6 times - slow mode - and heard "ve"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/williamjon4

I used to really struggle with the voice on Duolingo and I thought it was one of the weakest parts of the program, but then I went and spent 5 months in South America. I discovered that a lot of the blurred sounds that we confuse on DL as English speakers are actually how native Spanish speakers pronounce certain letters (B and V are the most obvious i can think of but there are others). I know it's frustrating but keep trying and the practice will really help when you have to listen to real people speaking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KornBreZ

Thanks i thought it was just me cuz sometimes this can become very confusing and hard to understand so thanks for your outlook of things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyBalles1

I notice I get a different sound from phone compared to pad I have a galaxy s6 but galaxy pad seems much clearer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoWoodman1

Thats a good point, decent headphones may be in order for mobile app


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gaelwynd

I feel relieved now, because I heard "d'agua" as if it were one word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikita397830

They also do that. If a word ends in the same sound the next starts with they will join. Like "de el " becomes "del ".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qntm314

Not exactly, the sounds join but the words do not. Such as <<Mi Hijo>> sounds like <<Mijo>>


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/msdauphin

that happens to me too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoseCraig

Im always playing the guessing game just so i can move on...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DCPolk

Yes, I heard "va"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jameswimbledon

i heard da, wrote da and it says correct. Not sure what da is


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenryNix

Da = he/she/it gives, from dar = to give.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dani281...

Me too and I wasn't sure what that would mean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob20020

"B" and "V" are interchangeable, but you can't switch whenever you want. You can but "vacha" (cow) is pronounced "bvacha", pretty sure. Not a native, this is probably wrong....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oldestguru

The Spanish scholars tend to agree that the sound should always be B while the written letters are either B or V, depending on the historical spelling coming from Latin etc. I can hear that the natives pronounce it kind of in between the b and v, like a mix of 70%B and 30%V when it's the first sound of a word, and a mix of 55%V and 45%B when it's in the middle of the word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blas_de_Lezo00

They are not interchangeable, "b" and "v" represent the same sound /b/ plosive bilabial voiced, when it is between voiced sounds is pronounced /β̞/ that is, fricative instead of plosive.

"b" is pronounced exactly the same as "v" in Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oldestguru

Blas_de_Lezo00 your second statement contradicts the first. First you say that both written letters "b" and "v" should sound like a soft B (voiced bilabial fricative, not plosive as in a hard B). And then you say that "B" should be pronounced "V" which is a voiced dentolabial fricative. Very confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blas_de_Lezo00

No oldestguru, I do not say "B", but /b/. The first, "b", is a letter, the second, /b/, is a sound. Have you got any knowledge about phonetics, if so we can argue.

Thanks dwheatl, you understand what I say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwheatl

No, Blas is saying the Spanish b and Spanish v are pronounced exactly the same; both sound like the soft b in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malkeynz

I think the voice might have changed since this comment was made, I heard "da" without any trouble.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDain

I think it might actually be a speaker thing, because when I was using my laptops built in speakers, I heard va, but I hear da when using my amplified external speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdPoor

No, i heard "ve agua" also. Is there a regional variant where [d] is pronounced [v]?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azzyhaze

When you pronounce the letter D in English, your tongue is pressed against the roof of your mouth and right behind your teeth. In order to pronounce the D in Spanish, you put the tip of your tongue in between your teeth, which gives the letter a sound that's more like a TH.

With this in mind, see if you cant hear the speaker saying "THAH" for "DA."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MicahDoo

d here should be pronounced like "th" in "the"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joehhendrickson

Very soft "d" is common in Spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dhani03

Agreed, but I heard "de"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustinAver2

Because in spanish v sounds like b, b sounds like v and b sounds like th.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OreoMcsnuffles

Yis, that's how it's supposed to sound... I got yelled at quite a bit for pronouncing -d instead of -v...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trevzilla

so inconsistent, drives me crazy. Sometimes ll sounds like y, sometimes like j. Pick a dialect and stick with it please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_ava_a24

okay GOOD FOR YOU BUT NOBODY LISTENS 6 TIMES THEY JUST WANT TO GET ON WITH THE STUPID LESSON AND STOP GETTING DISTRACTED BY COMMENTS BECAUSE IT TAKING THEM 20 MINUTES AND THEIR ENTIRE TREE IS NOT STRENGTHENED AND THEY KEEP THINKING OF THINGS TO ADD ON THIS COMMENT CASE IN POINT ME!!!!!!!!!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amodia

If they add like "..a su perro" the sentence would feel more complete.
(thanks seruyn)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/serguyn

Why para? A su perro.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hhowell4694

Unfortunately, that gets into the area of indirect objects and their pronouns and people just aren't ready for that yet. If you only add "a su perro" the sentence would be agramatical. Ella le da agua a su perro would be grammatically correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonathanWh20

Unless she is Aquarius


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sophie106

"She gives." Is a full sentences. The water is just describing what she gives.

So think of it as if there was a princess just born. Throughout the kingdom, people give gifts to the baby. "As the streets lined up, people from every corner or the kingdom and every social class comes bearing gifts. A large butcher carries a slab of his finest meat, and he gives it to the king before retreating back to the crowd. Some orphan boys could give nothing more than one of their old wooden horses, but the king welcomed the gift all the same and kissed them on the forehead before they ran off down the street. Then, a small woman walks up, her face blank as she carries a bucket towards the gift table. She gives water."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeff.suter

Nice short story to give a meaningful context to the lesson. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FSheaF

Wow. sophie106, have you ever thought of being an author?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/burgerburglar

This sentence makes no sense at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rachvx

Think of Bible times or something, giving water to sheep/donkeys/etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeff.suter

Or when that woman at the well gave water to Jesus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sophie106

Think of it like a gift. "She gives," is a grammatically correct sentence, and it is just describing what she gives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fargbast

Another grammatically correct sentence is "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScarletCrackle

thanks, this makes sence. But still, water is a poor gift =(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/catcampion

Not during these droughts that are happening around the world. It may soon be the greatest (life-saving) gift on the planet!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeff.suter

The sentence "Water is life" has many levels of truth to it. The houseplants I grow always appreciate it when I give them water. Without water it is only common sense to think that most biological life as we currently experience and observe it would certainly be distinctly different than what is currently existing on this lovely planet of our ours. That is if biological life could exist at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hungrybro

But who was Xbox 360


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

While they, those other guys, don't give food, she gives water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simpsongeorge

sounds like 'passes water' a little too much, except directed at someone, i.e. she wees on people... Anyone else finding duolingo has often funny/disturbing sentences? oh well its past my bedtime...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkyGreen

Maybe like if they asked, what does she give to the food pantry? And the answer is "She gives water."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate_Holloway

Youve obviously never been in a third world country where clean water is a nicety.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarryGyles

Necessity* Wanna be mates my first duolingo amigo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baker910

Sentences need only a subject and a verb to make them complete. "She gives," would be a perfectly acceptable sentence grammatically speaking. She gives water is just adding the information of what she gives. Even though it doesn't tell you who or what she gives water to, the sentence is still complete. Understanding this in English will make learning grammar in other languages much easier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jagonics

I really can't agree with you. There are some verbs in English that are only transitive, so they need an object. I will give you some examples:

He brings.

She supports.

It interests.

All of the above sentences are incorrect because these verbs can be only transitive. If you don't believe me, consult a dictionary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azzyhaze

"What does that woman give?" "She gives water." She drinks water. She spills water. She gives water. Just because that sentence would not normally roll off of the tongue in normal usage doesn't make it grammatically incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RatInAMaze

But: "I give and I give, but I never get any thanks."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeslieFielding

She definitely says va not da


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevstaunton

Spanish has such a soft 'd' that is often sounds like a' v' or a 'th' In English the 'd' sound comes from the tongue on the palate, in Spanish the tongue is pressed gently against the back of the top teeth, almost like 'th'. hence the confusion. I think that although it sounds confusing here and now, on a busy Spanish street it is worse, trust me on that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnjeTheNerd

Please tell me this isn't a euphemism for urination....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeff.suter

Ok. This isn't a euphemism for urination. Honest.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

That is right. It isn't. No bearing. No correspondence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rachvx

I LOVE how Spanish flows... "Ella dagua" almost


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kc_kennylau

Yep, Spanish does link words together. Therefore, "ella ha hablado" would sound like "ellablado".

http://spanish.about.com/cs/pronunciation/f/rate_of_speech.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hhowell4694

We do it in English too. Say this sentence quickly: Ben needs some more. (Ben_needs_some_more). Can you hear it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ryan.levy.

So the audio on Duo sucks, I could hear what she was saying . I hear "ella va agua" which confused me. I heard it 1000 times. She is not saying ella da agua.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RileyHarri1

Yeah, I'm on the side of this being awkward. Intransitive give only sounds ok in phrases like, "give up." "She gives water," requires some kind of additional context. But all this makes me wonder: is this awkward in Spanish? Does it feel like "ella da agua" is missing something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RatInAMaze

At the very least, it's missing context that would make its English translation understandable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardSch3

In English this sentence would have an indirect object as in She gives us water, or she gives him water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrekl

What is the difference between "da" and "entrega"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jessica67657

can explain why it is da?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkyGreen

The present tense of dar. I give -yo doy You informal -tú das He, she it, you sing formal - él, ella, usted da We give - nosotros, nosotras damos They, you plural formal - ellos, ellas, ustedes dan


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/valdemarvascaino

27.12.2013

Translation(Duo): " She gives water. "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tessbee

... to the elephant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate_Holloway

So if this was french, you would just say d'agua can you do that here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RatInAMaze

There's no written vowel elision in Spanish. Fast speech can make sounds run together, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Benzy911

and it was really wet!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twoodard1

Why "da" and not "dan"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuevesHuevos

Ella is singular - she gives

"Dan" would be for a plural subject - they give

http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/dar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwheatl

That is one useless cow. I thought she would give milk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skepticalways

Funny to put it in that context! My problem was I didn't remember ever seeing the dang WORD before, so had so clue --could've been "She boils water" for all I knew.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renata7DelRey

Why can not be "She gives the watter?" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustinAver2

This is for everybody thats confused. B makes a v sound. V makes a b sound and d makes a th sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WarrenEsch

Some of the comments makes me not miss the comedy channel since we threw tv out...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/curiosa75

Does anyone know when to use "con" as about vs. with?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hhowell4694

Most of the time it means 'with'. There are some verbs that when it is paired up it gives the meaning of 'about'. Like soñar (to dream), soñar con (to dream about). There aren't really any hard and fast rules, you just learn them as you go.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Telisa7

Thank you for that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hhowell4694

You're very welcome :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adefpoetsvisual

Could it be ella entrega agua too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cend86

In my spanish class I learned that when a word ends in the same letter as the next beginning word, speakers pronounce it as one word, so it becomes difficult to differentiate words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Idraote

is she a fountain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lobo_rojo

Hi I am a German native speaker, but as the German Spanish course is still beta I decided to go for the English Spanish version, much better. But this sentence has the same strangeness in German. It is grammatically correct, but does not feel right. In German myself and people I talked to would consider the sentence strange, guessing some sickness with the lady, not that she would urinate on purpose, but because she has no control. The princess story above is bypassing the point. It tells us under what circumstances the water is given. So when our sentence discussed appears, the recipients of the water are already known. Fwiw.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alysonic

She gives water=ella da agua., she gives milk=ella da leche., she gives cookies= ella da galletas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/demachr

It sounds like ella dagua. But, this was a translate question, not a Hear and put down what it said question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hhowell4694

And it should sound like that, due to linking the vowels (da_agua). It happens with consonants as well. We link words in English too. Example: 'Ben needs some more'. Ben_needs_some_more.

The consonants at the end are linked to the same consonants at the beginning of the next word. Although 'some' ends in a vowel, it ends in a consonant sound. Just something to keep in mind when doing the listening exercises.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoodluckShonna

Never learned this, but ok Duolingo, ok.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graci3M3l0n

Yay good for you being water to the poor people around the world who do not have water


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AidaBrown

To who? JESUS?!?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SenorTornike

Whats does "da" mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaliaRice1

When do you use 'va' and when do you use 'da'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwheatl

Va is go. Da is give. Use accordingly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/404consultant

Looking at the comments, it funny how we have the same issues at the same level.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chavuelo

I answered "She spoils water" since it said spoils is one of the possible meanings of the word "da" but duo said it was wrong, why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mymomrox

The water god!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l_otto

is said "She give water" on accident and i get it totally wrong just because i missed the s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_MsLexi_

I thought dan was give. I was never shown the other conjugations of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hhowell4694

If you know typical conjugation patterns you can figure it out. If not, I recommend wordreference dot com


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoredWithDuoNow

Why isn't it, el agua? I keep reading that general concepts of a noun require the article, in Spanish. This is pure guesswork for me at the moment. Frustrating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaGreat_SeanDon

This sentence feels incomplete


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chatulov

Why not "she is giving water"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brackenwood3

Poorly pronounced - please correst


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chidz5

The thirst is real


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah86687

Yeah my cow definitely has a problem i guess!? She was supposed to give milk. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/candibee

Why would "She has water" not be acceptable, if the verb "dar" can mean to give OR to have?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blas_de_Lezo00

da must be stressed as it is the verb of the sentence. It is hardly heard in the audio.


[deactivated user]

    i dont get it, she gives water? you cant give people water.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blas_de_Lezo00

    You can give them snow, if you prefer!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonathan.Park

    well this ones not confusing at all x3


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chakra23

    The fixed it. Its clearly da


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gibbehswag

    Ella tambien da leche ;)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarleyTee

    I wrote ella da agua and it marked me wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/williammiller1

    she gives water but not soda not milk not juice why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lordlucianus

    Now how about "she deals water." Imagine a world where water is a forbidden good. "she deals" is listed in the suggestions. Would that be possible?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liv_waterfall

    Anyone using an iPad or a tablet because I'm using a tablet


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I_Am_Norah

    Apparently "She gives the water" is not acceptable


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lila.duolingo

    I keep mis-translating it like this when my brain turns off: She's the agua


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankEdger

    I had no difficulty understanding what was said, however, I have never heard someone say this in English! The sentence lacks clarity.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hexe8

    ...said Quasimodo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPrice0

    Thank you, hexe8. That is what I thought about immediately. "She... gave... me...water." Wonderful. That made a deep impression on me way back.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bbedford59

    The answer to the question "What does she give to thirsty people?" Por qué le importa a la gente sedienta? Ella le da al agua.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/serguyn

    Bad translation, dude.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darkshadow117

    Yeaaa. That's a really bad translation


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/camomma9552

    It is one big slurred mess.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

    Only to a dirty mind. Even in a slang dictionary there would be found no vulgar association to what this sentence is saying.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hugobokman

    She spoils water (they say it is wrong)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

    Wow! How do you figure that?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/penningtonc

    The more I learn of Spanish, the more confusing it all seems.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lobo_rojo

    You are lucky, you found the real stuff

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