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"Is maith liom an t-earrach."

Translation:I like the spring.

3 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bhursttn
bhursttn
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In English, I wouldn't use an article with a season except after a preposition ("in the spring"). Is the article required in all circumstances in Irish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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For seasons used as nouns, yes. (Seasons used as adjectives wouldn’t need one.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bhursttn
bhursttn
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Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

It's very common in Hiberno-English, probably as a result of native Irish speakers being forced to learn English. Some examples:

"It's a shame the summer's over."

"Ah yeah, sure the autumn's turning out to be grand."

"I'm not looking forward to the winter, though."

"Thank Christ the spring's here. I thought the winter would never end."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileanoirCM

I'm from Belfast and I thought the definite article before seasons was just standard English :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skrats
skrats
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I'm from Pennsylvania, and don't find putting "the" with a season odd at all. I also thought it waa standard.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Most of those articles would be heard in US English as well — I think that only your spring example would commonly go without.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Not necessarily, I would say "It's a shame that summer's over." "Yes, autumn's turning out to be great." "I'm not looking forward to winter, though." "Thank God, spring's here. I thought winter would never end." If I wanted to be specific, I would likely say "This autumn's turning out to be great!" You could use "the" or not.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes, it’s possible in US English to omit the article, but my experience has been that the article is more often present than absent.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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In the USA, that has not been my experience. In spoken language, we try to cut as many corners as possible. In poetry you might see "the" used more. "Winter is over!", "Spring has sprung!" and "Summer has almost begun!" "Autumn will come after that." For us, these are "names" of seasons. You sound quite stiff and formal when you use "the" as if you were writing a thesis about the season. "In the winter, the wildlife is harder to find, as many animals are hibernating." So you will hear it this way on nature channels. So, what part of the US are you from?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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My experience with US English is as a native speaker of many decades. I don’t always use an article with seasons — I’d say “Spring has sprung!”, and “Autumn will come after that.” without articles, but I’d say “The winter is over!” and “The summer has almost begun!” with articles.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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I’m originally from the west, but most of my years have been in the east. Both my parents and I were born and raised in the US. Neither my parents nor I majored in English.

I am not saying you are wrong to use the article, but it does date you a bit. It just means that you are viewing "the winter" and "the summer" as very specific instances of those seasons rather than as a season that comes and goes. "Summer is almost here!"

If you say "I like the spring." that does not mean that you like that season. It means that you like a particular instance of spring […]

Given my age, I could well be dated. When I say “I like the spring”, it does mean that I like that season, so in fact you are saying that I would be wrong to use the article. If I were referring only to the current spring, I’d say “I like this spring”. In a written context, if I were using “spring” as a name, I’d capitalize it without an article — “I like Spring.”

If you use "the" then there should be a limiting modifier.

Would you say the same of “I like the theater”, meaning “I like to attend theatrical performances”?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Yes, I would say "I like theater." It is a generalization for which we do not use definite articles. If I said "I like the theater." , then I would be talking about a specific theater. Now, I know that on the East Coast, people do have a tendency to say "the theater" to indicate just how special it is and they are referring to the entire form of entertainment, as opposed to some other form of entertainment. That is exactly why I was asking for some indication of where you were used to listening to English. I am saying that "I like spring." is very common over here and that your experience that "the" is used more often is not my experience. People do it as it is a way of saying "the season of spring" rather than some other season. I don't do that. Imagine if we did that for everything. I like the baseball. (as opposed to any other sport) People are more likely to think you are talking about a particular baseball rather than the sport. So you could specify "I like the sport of baseball." If I wanted to do as you do, I would say "I like the season of spring.", but it sounds strange now to say "I like the spring." We just know that some people of earlier generations were doing that. So it depends on the earlier question, if someone asked "What form of entertainment do you like?" I know that some people would answer "the theater". It is a way of making that form of entertainment seem more special than other forms of entertainment. "I like theater. I like comedy and I like drama. I like musicals. I even like opera. I like languages too. I like spring.
I like winter. I like summer. I even like autumn."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It is a generalization for which we do not use definite articles.

So which “we” did you mean here?

Yes, it is special to use a definite article when you are not talking about something definite.

No — it can be special, but it isn’t always special. I’ve already provided examples where it is not special.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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You impart extra meaning to the words "the water" if you mean aquatic recreation. then you have made it special. So perhaps our definition of special is different? When you say "the theater", you also have the extra meaning of the entire form of entertainment shown in theaters. I have agreed that some people do use "the" with words that are not definite, but I have simply disagreed that it is more common to use the definite article with "spring" when not following a preposition these days, and I even said, at least in my area. Look it up! Searches for "the spring" keep showing me definite uses or show me spring without "the", because I searched for "the spring" images came up with "the spring" but when I clicked on it the only thing with "the spring" was an organization with that name. http://www.bing.com/search?q=the%20spring=n==8-10=BDKTMS=BDT3==0000=en-US When I personally hear "the spring", the first thing that comes to mind is a particular spring of water or a particular coil or spring that is elastic or metal (such as in a device or bed). http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spring

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It is a generalization for which we do not use definite articles.

Which “we” did you mean here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Would you say "I like money." as a generalization? How about "I like Christmas."? http://linguapress.com/grammar/article-in-english.htm

http://www.edufind.com/english-grammar/definite-article/

http://www.grammaring.com/the-zero-article-with-names-of-days-months-seasons-holidays-and-parts-of-the-day

You are right that some people do use "the" with seasons in a general statement. See this interesting forum discussion: https://www.englishforums.com/English/ArticlesWithSeasons/cwczz/post.htm

I know with prepositions I don't mind the definite article, but after the verb "like" is when I particularly have an aversion to using "the" with the season. I did mention that I am from California. We includes the people I grew up with, went to school with, work with, etc. Remember we were talking each from our own experiences.

Even in the following article they just say "spring" without the definite article unless it is in a prepositional phrase or when there is another noun following it.
http://www.livescience.com/24728-spring.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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You equate “The winter is over!” with writing a thesis about winter?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes, I would say "I like theater." It is a generalization for which we do not use definite articles.

Which “we” do you mean? Would you also say “I like water” to mean “I like aquatic recreation”? I’d say “I like the water” for that meaning.

Now, I know that on the East Coast, people do have a tendency to say "the theater" to indicate just how special it is […]

I disagree with your reasoning. I don’t consider the theater to be special (I’m not a fan of it), but I still say “the theater”. Similarly, I don’t consider “I like the water” to indicate any sort of specialness compared to dry land, and I’d say “I need to go to the hospital” despite referring to no particular hospital. Would you say “I need to go to hospital”, as (at least) Britons do?

Imagine if we did that for everything.

Why? I’d already noted above that I don’t do that for everything.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skrats
skrats
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Is a native American English speaker, I always put ths article with the seaaon.

7 months ago