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"Tengo dolores en el pecho."

Translation:I have pains in my chest.

5 years ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

The pain in my chest is due to the removal of an excessive number of hearts by a picky owl!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EpicNougat
EpicNougat
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Are you sure it wasn't because you had multiple hearts crammed in behind your chest?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Nope. I have been told all my life that I am full of heart. Note for non-native-English speakers: "full of heart" is an idiom that means courageous, generous, compassionate.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EpicNougat
EpicNougat
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Well played. I feel that I can learn much from you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oonamas

A more natural translation would be I have chest pains.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"I have chest pains" is the answer I got when I put "My chest hurts".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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More natural, where?

To me (Hiberno- and British-English) "I have pains in my chest" would definitely be more natural.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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To me (central Canada), both "chest pains" and "pains in my chest" seem equally natural.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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I've lost so many hearts no wonder i have pains in my chest

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Yes Why not "I have chest pains"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

"I have pain in my chest" is perfectly acceptable English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

¡Porque he perdido tantos corazones!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marilynls
Marilynls
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Why don't they use ?Tengo Dolores en mi pecho?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Spanish has a case called inalienable possession, which we commonly use with the verb tener (and others), basically any noun (mostly body parts) using a determiner (most commonly a definite article) alongside this verb can belong to the subject of the sentence (depends on context), for instance, tienes algo en la mano (the hand belongs to you), tengo los ojos azules (the eyes are mine), él tiene una mancha en la camisa (the shirt belongs to him), tenemos el cabello negro (the hair is ours). To say/write things like tengo dolores en mi pecho is considered to be a rookie translator's mistake, although I don't think it is exactly a mistake, simply not a common way of speaking.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marilynls
Marilynls
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Great reply! It is funny how languages differ in usage of certain terms. Such as, "the eyes are mine" instead of "my eyes;" "the hand belongs to you" instead of "your hand;" and "the hair is ours" instead of "our hair." These types of rules get me every time. But, I've come to accept mistakes because in this situation, you have a good chance to learn in depth because of the discussion answers. Thanks again!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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They would probably ask why we don't use "the" instead of "my" for personal things like body parts. It's just the way the languages work.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaBocaDelLobo

Is it not more natural to say "Me duele el pecho"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Maybe, but this sentence sounds like something you would tell your doctor.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puiu1941

What's wrong with"my chest hurts"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Just guessing, but maybe that's "Me duele el pecho". In English, "my chest hurts" seems a bit milder than "I have chest pain". (But from this discussion, it looks like DL doesn't like "I have chest pain" either, so maybe it just hasn't been reported and/or accepted yet.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hoja.de.Arce
Hoja.de.Arce
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No "I have a chest ache"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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I don't think "chest ache" is used in English (at least not in the UK), rather "stomach ache".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hoja.de.Arce
Hoja.de.Arce
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Do people in Britain call it a "stomache ache" when their chest is sore? That must be awfully confusing!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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No, rather, I don't think "chestache" is usual (British) lexicon. We don't usually treat English like German, in which they stick lots of words together to make new words. While I would understand what you mean by a "chestache", its not a word I've ever seen, heard or used before.

My point about "stomachache" was that it is a word in English (along with headache, toothache, and perhaps a few others) and I thought perhaps you mixed up the too. In any case, stomachache shouldn't be accepted here, since as you rightly point out, that's not what the Spanish is saying.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomeGreen

Why not aches ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarleneGrimaldi

I've chest pains

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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Llama una ambulancia pronto!

9 months ago