"Codlaím."

Translation:I sleep.

3 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/montaffera
montaffera
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Sounds like "cuddle in". Awww ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knoxienne
Knoxienne
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Yes, exactly! That's how I can remember it - all snuggly in bed for a good night's sleep. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/montaffera
montaffera
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I have a 22 month old in my bed a lot who gives amazing cuddles, but not the best night's sleep ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knoxienne
Knoxienne
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LOL I can imagine! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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Surely, 'cuddlin'', which makes more sense (at least in my variation of English)?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windsaw

I wonder why the "d" is not pronounced at all. I am not aware of a rule that says it is not pronounced in that location. I doublechecked at focloir, it is the same in all three dialects.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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There are a few examples of silent consonant combinations; this combination, dll, occurs with e.g. codlaím, codladh, and Fódla. (The pre-reform spelling of Nollaig was Nodlaig ; it had the same pronunciation that it does now.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZeroHeFlies

Is "laím" supposed to sound like "liam"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Laím should sound more like “leam” (one syllable) than “Liam”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barbara.gr5
barbara.gr5
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good to know. wish the audio was better. I'm half afraid to practice speaking this for fear of learning it wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Margie22

You shouldn't be afraid of getting pronouciation wrong when learning a language. Mistakes are good and will help you in learning (:

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AGreatUserName
AGreatUserName
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Yeah, but mistakes won't help you learn if you don't know they're mistakes. That's the crucial part of learning from mistakes. If you only learn pronunciation from a source which is wrong, you'll prononounce everything wrong and it may be difficult to change the habit later. That's why I hope they fix up this pronunciation issue soon.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Radoslaw182
Radoslaw182
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Agreed. But here is also another problem with Duolingo's system - sentences sound as if glued from single words and expressions. I think they really are such. Until a native reads all sentences fully, the problem will sustain.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Radoslaw182
Radoslaw182
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That's what I always forget about. They always say to me that not bothering with errors is crucial for fluent speaking. Correctness will come itself.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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Indeed, it took a long time for me to be considered fluent in French because I'd always pause for about three minutes to deliberate on the grammar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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From reading far too many forum posts rather than doing the lessons, I've heard that your woman has the Munster accent/dialect and in this way, isn't particularly representative of the rest of the Gaeltachtái.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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It's quite difficult to see what you mean when your using English spellings which aren't phonetic. Why would you spell it with an 'a' if it's one syllable?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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English is not known for its phonetic spellings. I’d offered “leam” as a contrast to “Liam” to show that it would rhyme with “beam”, “ream”, and “team”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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OK. I didn't mean to be critical, you understand. Just asking for clarification. To be fair, the words 'reem' and 'teem' also exist, if a bit less common. I always go for IPA but that's assuming the other person has come across it (not so secretly, I think everyone should learn it).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Many people don’t use the IPA, so unless someone who asks a question shows knowledge of it, I’ll usually offer phonetickish spellings instead.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucRom5

It sounds like cailin

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/p8c
p8c
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i dropped a bit somewhere and am now wondering about the difference between "codlaím" and "Táim i mo chodladh.". can someone refresh my memory on the difference? thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baloug
Baloug
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Táim i mo chodladh is, from what I understand, a stative structure, that is it's a structure that implies no motion and the thing is happening right now, so "I am sleeping", whereas Codlaím is general present, so "I (generally) sleep".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/p8c
p8c
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ah! thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dar...
Dar...
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Why is the 'd' and 'a' there at all in 'codlaím'? It sounds like 'colím' and I don't understand the necessity for the extra letters. English has lots of these useless letters in words too. I want some secateurs to prune the dead wood.

4 months ago
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