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"Es hora de ir al colegio."

Translation:It is time to go to school.

5 years ago

91 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/npaff

colegio does not translate truly to college at least here in Mexico that would be universidad- colegio here translates to "school" for middle or high school students

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

In the Spanish of Spain, colegio means college or school. Not every college is a university.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Consider the word origins.

COLLEGE: C14: from Latin collēgium company, society, band of associates, from collēga; see colleague

SCHOOL: Old English scōl, from Latin schola school, from Greek skholē leisure spent in the pursuit of knowledge

INSTITUTE: C16: from Latin instituere, from statuere to place, stand

FACULTY: C14 (in the sense: department of learning): from Latin facultās capability; related to Latin facilis easy

I'm sure there are many other related words. Each of these words have many meanings eg the group of like-minded people, the buildings where they live and work, the institution or organisation. Be prepared to explain just which sort of college, school etc that you are referring to.

Reference: http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AimarOng
AimarOng
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That ends the argument.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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You are correct, except that some English speaking countries also use college as a word for general secondary education. Even in the States, a high school that offers vocational education may be referred to as a college.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoctilucaFirefly

I don't think I've ever heard a high school referred to as a college! Doesn't mean it doesn't get called that in some places, just saying that I haven't heard it. But college DOES get used to mean anything AFTER high school, be it community college, university, etc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

jindr004 is right that some secondary schools can be referred to as colleges in some places. The secondary school I went to was called a college. They're typically for students between 11 and 19 years old so they include the age that a US student would be in high school.

According to Wikipedia: "...in Ireland, the UK, New Zealand, Australia, Canada, Hong Kong and other former and present Commonwealth nations, "college" may refer to a secondary or high school..." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/College

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wonderwombat

No one in Australia calls a secondary school a college in normal conversation, however some private secondary schools use the word college as part of their name. For example Scots College is a secondary school in Sydney.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fia_Bui
Fia_Bui
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Ireland was never in the Commonwealth having revoked its Dominion status on the 18th April 1949 (Republic of Ireland Act). The Commonwealth was formed under the London Declaration on the 28th of April 1949.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/handymanplumbers

I feel exactly the same. In my area, college is always After High School.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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I don't know why you've been downvoted for this. It's correct of the UK and Ireland too, though uncommon.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickDoy18

Should be "escuela" if they mean (primary) school. College is secondary or university

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VeloVela

Ah okay, so it's like the French collège = middle school.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Why the DE after hora and before IR? IS DE always needed after "hora"? Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Same question. Went in search of answer. Hora de is a compound preposition. It could fall under the category of idioms which I found plenty for 'de'. I was surprised we hadn't seen this before now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/popa910
popa910
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As @ghayle16 mentioned, "de" is often used in situations where an English speaker would think "para" would be used

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghayle16

I have the same question -- I translate it as "es hora PARA instead of DE .. well, obviosly i was wrong. XD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doublerainbows

Colegio translates to "high school," right? I think "It's time to go to high school" should be accepted in addition to "It's time to go to school." Escuela is school (elementary) and colegio is high school, at least where I live.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfePetersen

Yes, in Costa Rica Colegio is High School

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ntinihoward

That is what I put. I guess it's wrong because we missed the word "the" which is underlined in the response. It was "al colegio" not "a colegio"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Except you leave for school, no matter which level. School is used in at least some US universities to denote some separate institutes. Medical, Business, Law School and School of Public Health, are some I've heard.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaestraMani

I agree. This is what I learned, and also what I am teaching my students. COLEGIO means "high school", so I would translate this sentence as "It is time to go to high school," which is essentially the same as just saying "It's time to go to school."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfePetersen

Colegio is High School in Costa Rica. Colegio is never college or school.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchyuthanS

Is it ok to call a college 'colegio', instead of 'universidad'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

Yes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Creo que depende.

One can refer to a University as a College, but it is not necessarily true the other way around (the exact distinction will vary from country to country).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

In Canada we have some private schools called college grades 7-12

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Is college the same in Spanish than in English. I know in French and in English, it's completely different; Collège is used for middle school, and le lycée for the college.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda
Luscinda
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College covers a wide variety of meanings in English - further education college (i.e. tertiary education that is not university education), a college with in a university, College of Heralds etc, college as the name of a a secondary school (both state and private) etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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And this is why I prefer the French naming convention! There is much less ambiguity!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/koredaniel

My issue is the voice. I don't hear the voice say "IR". I hear "e" and in "y" in spanish. I hear "Es hora de y al colegio"...which clearly doesn't make any sense. Can duolingo offer other voice options?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/weichwieschnee
weichwieschnee
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That's how it's pronounced though. The "r" sound is not an English "r," it ends up sounding more like a "d." And the sentence you've posted wouldn't make any sense otherwise, so you just have to think of what word would make more sense contextually

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IbexChristie

But in some examples you do hear the "ir" sounding like ''ear"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IbexChristie

I find this as well in more than one example

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

I put 'It is the hour to go to the college', and it was marked wrong, because I said hour, and not time. It could mean either.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Yes, the literal translation is 'hour', but if I want to ask what 'time' it is, I say 'Qué hora es?' in Spanish, but not, 'What hour is it?' in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelestapleton

My answer was marked wrong because I inserted "the" yet the sentence said "al colegio." Doesn't al mean "to the"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Yes, 'al' does mean 'to the', but you cannot always translate literally from one language to another, especially where prepositions are concerned. In this case, we don't add 'the' after the preposition 'to'.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamalaBlugh

When do I use "hora" and when do I use "vez"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

"Think of tiempo vs hora vs vez as 'quantity of time' vs 'clock time' vs 'moments in time'." - http://www.realfastspanish.com/vocabulary/tiempo-vs-hora-vs-vez

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DailyGrace

But, with those guidelines, I would not use "hora" in this sentence... or in "Que hora es?"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

When you ask "qué hora es?" somebody can respond with "it's 8:00". That's the time on the clock. If you say "It's 8:00, time to go to school", you're taking about the time on the clock.

But if you say "toma mucho tiempo", you're not talking about a specific time on a clock, just saying that something will take a while. Or "hace mucho tiempo" - a long time ago.

And if you talk about "esta vez" or "la próxima vez que vas a la oficina" or "la última vez que fuiste a la playa", you're still not talking about a specific time on the clock, you're talking about a moment or event.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamalaBlugh

Thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anthony575229

Por esp EEUU, colegio es "highschool" puse "it is time to go to highschool", esta respuesta no sirve :(?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darkenstern

In Mexico school is escuela. Colegio is high school. It is also referred to as escuela secondaria or prepa. "It is time to go to the high school" should be accepted.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darkenstern

This time I answered " It is time to go to the college" and it was accepted. College in Mexico is Universidad not Colegio. Colegio is strictly undergraduate and thus should not have been accepted.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SirMattypants

another case where the word* has multiple meanings/uses

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Recyclabes
Recyclabes
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Why is it "al" and not "a"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

"Al" is like a contraction for "a" + "el".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Recyclabes
Recyclabes
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I know, but why is there an "el", that's my main question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MamaLori5-30
MamaLori5-30
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I can't figure out when to add an article! Grrr!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LIermo
LIermo
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There is a difference between "to college" and "to the college"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Recyclabes
Recyclabes
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But the translation shows it as "go to school", not "go to the school".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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You cannot always translate literally from one language to another, especially where prepositions are concerned. In this case, we don't add 'the' after the preposition 'to'.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sobmar
sobmar
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Why not "This is time to go to the college"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

That would be 'esto' instead of 'es'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alphabetjohn
alphabetjohn
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Does this mean that it's nearly time for class to begin for the day? Or does it mean that the young person who hasn't made any plans needs to start thinking about college?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

It means that it's time to go for the day.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alphabetjohn
alphabetjohn
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Thank you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RHCPfreak9

escula=colegio?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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No. "Escula" is primary school, typically for 4 to 12 year olds, while "colegio" is "secondary school/ middle- & high-school", typically for 13 to 18 year olds.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Es 'escuela'*

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marycpa

there is a typo in the 'hover hint' for "de" in this sentence. It says "off" instead of "of," as it should. I blindly believe Duo ALWAYS & thought it was some convention when assembled with these other words. I wrote, "It is time to go off to school." And I was WRONG. Dummies.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k.hart_sr

It doesn't sound like the last "O" in "colegio" is pronounced. Is this error on my part? Duo's? Or not an error at all?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Calinator

what is the point of "de" here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasSwan8

"it is about time to go to school" was incorrect for me?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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You have added a word (about) that isn't there.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielSala305814

But mommmm i dont want to

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vlauntern

nooooo!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darious12

So what is escuela for...pre k

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

Day care. Actually, colegio should be used to mean college. It could be translated as 'school', but in the sense that the school is a college.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BernardBus3

Why do we not get two tries anymore? The voice pickup system is flaky enough that it quite often fails to assess a well pronounced answer. And while I am at there is no longer a box to make comments in the Report a Problem window.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

I didn't know that we got two tries. I just did a lesson, and noticed for the first time that the Report a Problem oval was not included. Maybe Duolingo didn't have the time to go through all the reports.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RWang2017
RWang2017
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Why isn't an article "la" for "hora" here? Is "Es la hora de ir al colegio" correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

That makes sense if you're thinking of "hora" as meaning "hour", but "hora" can also mean "time".

I don't know whether it's correct with the "la", but it's definitely correct without it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RWang2017
RWang2017
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Are you a native Spanish speaker? Don't all nouns need to have an article in Spanish?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

There are some cases in which the definite article is omitted before a noun. For instance, the translation of "he is a dentist" is "es dentista". However, I don't know if the sentence using "hora" does or does not require a definite article.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GloriaGlor359189

"De" means "about" so I translated the sentence, It is about time to go to school.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

As far as I know, "de" means "about" only in the sense of a topic or theme. SpanishDict gives "hablábamos de ti" (we were talking about you) and "libros de historia" (history books) as examples. In these cases it's similar to the word "sobre" or "acerca de"

The meaning that you're thinking of would probably be best achieved by using words like "alrededor de", "aproximadamente", "mas o menos" or "casi".

These pages may be useful: about and almost.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2_Learn_Spanish

Did it work? :)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2_Learn_Spanish

Quick question; why is "de" there? In the drop down definitions it says it means "about" but I don't think that, "it's time about to go to school" would be correct.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

"Es hora de" and "es tiempo de" are fixed expressions which translate to "it's time to". You can't translate "de" to "about" in this context.

You can see some examples here.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CandySpani1

I made a typo should have been accepted as others are.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JCoBJy
JCoBJy
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I always thought Escuela, Secundaria, Colegio, Universidad. Secundaria meaning high school??

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diane101106

College or school should be exceptable as an answer

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'College' is really a 'false friend'. The English word 'college' is usually 'instituto', whereas the Spanish word 'colegio' refers to younger children and usually translated as 'school'.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GateAN
GateAN
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I'd argue that as ' collegio' is open to being both "school or college" but "escuela" is just a school, DL should accept either answer, ( not just school), or use " escuela" in the question if they only want to accept " school" as an answer

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jayesh_Bhaware

Why is college wrong?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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En inglés un 'college' normalmente es un 'instituto o facultad', pero un 'colegio' es 'school'.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucalu4
lucalu4
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En España, por norma general y resumiendo (dejando a un lado otras alternativas menos comunes) tenemos la siguiente estructura académica:

Guarderia --> niñ@s hasta 3 años Colegio==escuela --> niñ@s de 4-14 años Instituto --> niñ@s de 14-18 años Universidad --> 18 años en adelante

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucalu4
lucalu4
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X cierto, "facultad" uno de los edificios que componen la universidad

3 weeks ago