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https://www.duolingo.com/Kelbie_

Thinking in English, Talking in Spanish

Kelbie_
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So far im only a week in but have finnished just past the first checkpoint on my tree and am fairly comfortable with everything but i can only really translate from Spanish to English and not the other way. I know a word in spanish when i see it but cant quite remember enough of them to translate English to Spanish. This will obviously be a problem when i try to speak the language so i was wondering if anyone had any tips?

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Only that it's the same for almost everyone, that our comprehension runs far ahead of our ability to say things, especially getting all the tenses and inflections right. If speaking is one of your most important goals, then there are many people here who need English language natives to practice their English with, and they will help you practice your Spanish at the same time. Just reply to the next dozen or so who post asking for someone. It's hard but also fun! It helps to keep a sense of humor because we all will make many mistakes. Don't worry about that, just keep going! Good luck!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wildfood
wildfood
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I read many book series (Harry Potter, The Maze Runner, Game of Thrones, Percy Jackson, and a LOT more) in Spanish and still could not write an intelligible sentence in Spanish. Grammar is important and I am only now getting an inkling of it after having completed my Spanish tree and also the reverse tree. The reverse tree is where the grammar began to sink in with all the Spanish sentences I had to write.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelbie_
Kelbie_
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Do the reverse trees have the same information as the normal trees? or are all the words completely different?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wildfood
wildfood
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Most of the words are the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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make a list of Spanish words and write as many sentences as you can with them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goorski
goorski
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You can start Spanish to English tree also.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjaumjaupurr
mjaumjaupurr
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I would definitely follow the suggestion to write your own sentences in Spanish using vocabulary you learned here on duolingo. Translation from Spanish to your first language is a relatively passive cognitive process and as helpful as Duolingo is, that is what we get the most practice in here. Generating your own sentences in the language creates new connections in your brain so the words and sentence patterns will "stick" better. Most of the sentences I write at the beginning stages of learning a language are kind of simple and silly, but it works!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kimberlytylr
kimberlytylr
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Yes! Do not be afraid to sound like a small child at first!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/connorhay12
connorhay12
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Go on to Immersion and translate (what you feel comfortable with) from Spanish to English. That is a good way to learn and get xp.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kimberlytylr
kimberlytylr
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My main suggestion is just to be patient with yourself, it will come!

Something I do sometimes (and I am sure this will sound silly) is that I just make up little conversations in my head in Spanish (or whatever language) and see if I can keep it going without slipping into English.

As far as Duolingo is concerned, I practice the introductory lessons multiple times before moving on and then go back to them constantly until I feel completely comfortable with the basics.

─░Buena suerte!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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I suggest using Anki flashcards for vocabulary review. Duolingo is great for drilling you on grammar, but it doesn't review the words often enough, and the built-in flashcard feature isn't adequate. Anyway, if you add new words to Anki as you come to them (don't bother trying to go back and add all the old ones--just add the ones you find you miss) and drill about 15 minutes per day.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Try the lang-8 site. You can write in Spanish, and native speakers (usually, I did have someone from Japan correct my Spanish) will correct your Spanish. You can then do the same for people who are writing English sentences or paragraphs. You'll still be a ways from being able to speak, sine that requires a faster response time than writing, but it's good practice.
Reading comprehension, writing production, listening comprehension, speech production. Sometimes the writing production and listening comprehension are reversed, but this is the order which we tend to learn languages in.

3 years ago