"Går du universitetet?"

Translation:Do you go to university?

December 23, 2014

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CrazyChao

Does this imply just being a student at the university, or physically walking/going there?

December 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8

It either means being a student, or walking on top of the university building. The most common sense is probably the first one.

December 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SKWARDOL

So, if someone told me that. can i answer, "nej, jag åker" as a joke.

December 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/abrahamzetz

nej, jag springer :p

April 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/thomas_wall

I'm trying to understand how the definite form is being used here in the Swedish sentence. In English "Do you go to the university?" refers to a single, particular university. There would be a question about which university we were referring to, unless it was already established. The general question that only asks whether or not someone is a student is "Do you go to university?" without the article. Which of these does the Swedish question ask? Can it be both?

January 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

You're right, this Swedish sentence should be translated into English as "Do you go to university", that is the only true English counterpart. "Do you go to the university?" means Går du på det (där) universitetet. It can't be both.

January 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/g.uh

Why is på instead of till?

September 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Gå till would mean that you walked to the university, whereas this phrase means that you study there.

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sand_from_Mars

I don't agree... LOL ;-) Because I saw "jag går på diskotek", "vi går på museet". osv. So I think that Guh's question is pertinent!

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

The point still stands. If you "gå på museum", you go to a museum as in you see the exhibits there. But if you "gå till museet", you walked to a certain museum.

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sand_from_Mars

Okej! Tack! :) So, we must use "på" only if we are going to stay for a moment in this place. We could for example say: "Gå till museet, vi kommer att vänta på dig där." "Gå på museum, det är väldigt intressant."

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Yes, exactly. :)

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sand_from_Mars

"Ja går på museum" and "Jag går till museet", riktigt?

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Yes. With the "gå på" construction, indefinite is commonly used.

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Yuki_Shiro

I am not sure, but my guess is: we are asking wether a person generally visits university. Maybe it is different, if we ask a student in the morning, before he leaves the house.

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

No, it means studying at the university.

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TamaraP_

Can this phrase relate to the phrase "gå en utbildning"? I've seen it and it doesn't sound most natural to me, can I say "Jag gick en utbildning i svenska språket"?

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

I'm not sure how you mean by "relate to ", but the phrase "gå en utbildning" is perfectly fine, normal and common. :)

Your example sentence is fine too. It also works just as well with just "svenska".

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GaryAxelson

What is the difference between college - "högskol" and university - "universitet" in Sweden? Can you earn advanced degrees from a college or only from a university?

March 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DenOrangeMannen

My tongue always gets twisted with words that end in -itetet.

June 7, 2019
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