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"An veigeán."

Translation:The vegan.

3 years ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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This is going to be so useful (if I ever get to speak Irish to anyone). I think this is the only course that teaches this word; the others just teach ‘vegetarian’, which is really annoying to me as a vegan.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

This course teaches vegetarian, too, but the Béarlachas version: 'veigeatóir'. A more native word is 'feoilséantóir', 'one who denies meat'. Focloir.ie lists 'fíor-veigeatóir' as one possibility for 'vegan', so I will propose a new term for 'vegan': 'fíor-feoilséantóir'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anfeardathuil

If I'm not mistaken, the letter "v" is not in the Irish alphabet. I assume this is a Béarlacha, then, and that they can use English letters?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yep. It also happens in vóta, etc. Instead of, y'know, trying to come up with an Irish way, they just adopted straight English...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iongantas
iongantas
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why not bhfóta?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balbhan
balbhan
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They couldn't use "bhfota" because "bhf-" is only used as eclipsis for "f-".

In fact, apart from mutations and a few words like "bhur", the /v/ sound never occurs at the beginning of a word in Irish. Words that begin with /v/ are already noticeably foreign, so they may as well write them with a "v". Kind of like how nobody minds writing "xylophone" with an "x"!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paquititismo
paquititismo
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Guth which means voice is a more traditional word for vote

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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My pocket dictionary has around 50 Irish words beginning with V, eight Irish words beginning with J, as well as wigwam, xileafón, yóyó, and . In 1922, the English-Irish Phrase Dictionary included the following in its preface:

There can be no doubt but that the English language has influenced for fully a century past the language of native Irish speakers, even of those who know no English. To condemn all Irish that bears traces of such influence would be severe, and in many ways harmful. As far as possible, however, English turns of expression have been avoided in this book.

Anglicisms are not a new feature in Irish, although sometimes they have replaced older native forms (e.g. modern Véineas vs. mediæval Uenir for the goddess and the planet, both ultimately derived from Latin). Note that béarlachas (“anglicism”) is singular; its plural is béarlachais.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hec10tor
hec10tor
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good word to know when playing scrabble in irish! (if irish scrabble has a "v")

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

There's a photo of an Irish scrabble board in this discussion:
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/12686506

I don't see a "v"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mona-Maire
Mona-Maire
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I've also heard the word " féarairí " ('grassers', I guess) used to describe veggie lovers or people who choose vegetables over meat, but it's probably informal or 'slangish' like ...?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iongantas
iongantas
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I'm wondering why they didn't come up with a word based on glasraí.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Perhaps because glasrachán already exists with a different meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/B-mhongoadh

To be fair, languages are always influencing each other and given the Irish were the first to use gaps between words in written language, I think we're far enough ahead in terms of influence to have little need for being defensive.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamckillip48

What kindof word is 'vegan?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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A noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iongantas
iongantas
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It is also an adjective.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamckillip48

What'the difference betwern a 'vegan' and a 'vegetarian'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iongantas
iongantas
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Vegetarians will eat things like milk and eggs sometimes, and sometimes even fish (pescatarian), vegans generally completely eschew all animal products.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Faolan2016

Is maith liom an focal 'feoilséantóir' (vegetarian) which I think literally translates as 'meat avoider'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

There is a difference between "vegetarian" and "vegan".

The 1959 English Irish dictionary (de Bhaldraithe) doesn't have any entry for "vegan", and for vegetarian offers feoilséantach as an adjective (a vegetarian menu) and feoilséantóir as a masculine noun. The 1977 Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla (Ó Dónaill) offers some additional information on the plural and genitive forms of feoilséantóir. There isn't any entry for veigeán.

veigeatóir turns up in the New English-Irish Dictionary, along with feoilséantóir for "vegetarian", and there is also an entry for "vegan", offering both veigeán and fíor-veigeatóir.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AstroVulpes
AstroVulpes
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Why is the word for "vegan" introduced so much later than the word for "vegetarian"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

Tá sé veigeán ach tá mé ó Alfa Centauri!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Is veigeán é, ach is as Alpha Centauri mé.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

Go raibh maith agat!

I'm running into the same problem reading American and British based translations of English books into Irish. Americans and Brits may have a good vocabulary but idiom escapes us unless we have exposure to native speakers. Irish appears to be very eclectic, with many ways of saying the same thing and many meanings for what is said.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

In this case, there really isn't anything eclectic involved - you can't use "tá" when identifying or categorizing a noun or pronoun with another noun, you must use the copula.

I wasn't offering an alternative, I was making a correction.

Dealing with idioms arises in any language - for instance, I'm not sure that "is iomaí bealach le cat a mharú seachas é a thachtadh le him" is any stranger an idiom than it's English equivalent - "there's more than one way to skin a cat".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

Thank you again. I've noticed that the further along I get in the course the more grammar I have to learn. But it appears easier than if I'd started trying to do so before I'd memorized a few hundred words.

Is it true that there is a generic difficulty in that different Irish traditions also have evolved some diverging grammar?

1 year ago