"Katten sover var som helst."

Translation:The cat sleeps anywhere.

December 23, 2014

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cynyork

does this also mean "the cat sleeps where ever it wants"? or is the var som helst idiomatically different

February 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

I'd say var som helst means anywhere, and wherever it wants means var den vill.

February 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

This may be bordering on trivia... but the connection may be a bit easier to see through the older and slightly archaic variants varhelst den vill, närhelst den vill, etc. The helst is usually omitted nowadays, but it's still there in spirit. :)

February 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkBorkBorkBork

I find that useful. :)

Is helst in this context related to gärna at all?

February 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Solvind

I think helst is the superlative of gärna. The comparative is hellre.

March 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Ordinarily, yes. But in this context, it's unclear whether that's the exact sense being used.

March 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Good question. I suppose it depends on the etymology, which I do not know.

February 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/cynyork

thank you all so much! this class is great!!

February 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina_DN

I'm still confused about how to use it correctly. Can I say 'Var som helst går jag, där är du.'? I want to say' Anywhere I go, there you are.' Tack!

June 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mokane3562

So to be clear: 's' ALWAYS makes a 'sh' sound when preceded by an 'r' right? And something about a 't', 'n', or some other letters being between the 'r' and the 's'? So is the TTS wrong here?

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

No, it doesn't make any special sound if the r and the s belong to separate words, or to separate parts of a compound word. So in var som, or in a word like bärsele, they're pronounced like normal.

But apart from that, you're right - rs should otherwise have a "sh" sound, which is called sj-ljudet in Swedish. And rt and rn also have special sounds, like you say - again, assuming they're not parts of separate words or compounds.

That said, the TTS is still wrong in this case. The var should be pronounced with a long a, and the r should be heard.

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

I disagree, I think most people pronounce rs as that sound whenever they meet (though a lot of people are unaware of doing so).

Some dialects and individuals have a different R sound, and then R isn't assimilated.

The new TTS does this worse than the old one; the old TTS correctly assimilated over word borders too, but the new TTS has a special pronunciation of R (it more or less skips R:s entirely) that makes all the 'retroflex' combinations be pronounced in a way that is not the most standard one – she sounds like she's from Småland, I'd say.

To sum it up for learners, there are different pronunciations here. I'd say
1.) most speakers assimilate everywhere
2) some speakers differentiate like devalanteriel and don't assimilate over word borders
3) some speakers don't assimilate anywhere because of their R pronunciation

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Try saying a word like fyrsiffrig with a sj-ljud, even a slight one. It sounds like Sean Connery with a speech impediment. :)

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

That's how I say it, thanks for telling me I sound like Sean Connery :)

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoDojo

saying it WITHOUT sj-ljud sounds so ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ weird

March 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/schyrsivochter

No! The sj-sound, being a velopalatal fricative [ɧ(ʷ)] is not the same as the rs-sound, which is a retroflex fricative [ʂ].

June 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

I think it's correct to say they are the same in some dialects, but not in most.

June 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/schyrsivochter

Yeah.

June 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/EenYoFace

What about "The cat is sleeping" instead of "The cat sleeps?"

November 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkBorkBorkBork

"The cat is sleeping anywhere" has an inherent contradiction: "is sleeping" means right now, which can only be done in one location, while "anywhere" means in all locations. You could say "The cat is sleeping somewhere", but that is not a translation of the Swedish. In English, the simple present is used for habitual things. The continuous present, "is sleeping", can only mean at the present moment.

November 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Thanks Mark!

November 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivanbimbam

It's a nice explanation, but just to be pedantic, 'The cat is sleeping somewhere later' is possible, if we dont know where the location is and it's a future arrangement.

May 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122

Yes, your sentence is OK, but Mark's point is that the sentence "The cat is sleeping everywhere later" is illogical.

March 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielLuna729625

Can it be used as a answer? "Where is the cat sleeping?" "I don't know, the cat is sleeping anywhere."

June 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkBorkBorkBork

No. You could say "The cat is sleeping somewhere" though.

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielLuna729625

In Portuguese we have the both options, but the meaning is very different. Usually we translate "somewhere" as "algum lugar" and "anywhere" as "qualquer lugar". When we use "qualquer lugar" (anywhere/var som helst) sounds more or less like "no matter where" or "I have no idea where". When we use "algum lugar" (somewhere/någonstans) the meaning is "it is (definitely) in some place", but it sounds a bit obvious and the person can understand that you are mocking her (answering the question by saying nothing beyond the obvious), unless you are referring to a specific location.

(The cat is sleeping in a specific place, but I don't know where.)

To be simpler:

  • Algum lugar/somewhere/någonstans: It's sleeping in a specific place.

  • Qualquer lugar/anywhere/var som helst: Any place could be the place where it is sleeping.

But from what I understood in English one uses "somewhere" for both cases. Right?

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DonaldKidd

I am English mother tongue with a pretty good command of the language and I do not agree that "the cat is sleeping" can only mean that is it sleeping at the present moment! "The cat is sleeping anywhere" can mean that the cat has a habit of sleeping anywhere, in my humble opinion!

June 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenny349364

is there a difference in meaning between var som helst and någonstans? Or are they interchangeable?

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/4oYBIxtO

Var som helst is anywhere, någonstans is somewhere

February 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/floppet

Does "var som helst" also mean "wherever"? For example, could it be used a response to a question like "where do you want to eat?"

November 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/4oYBIxtO

Could be, yes

February 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/x7yr0n3

What is wrong with using "at any place" instead of "anywhere"? Don't these two mean the same?

April 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kiteo

It sounds awkward, imo. Not idiomatic.

July 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephTate5

This may have already been asked but if "När som helst" means anytime, and "Var som helst" means anywhere, what other variations are there? Does "Vem som helst" = anybody? Etc.

May 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Yes, and vad som helst = anything, etc. :)

May 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephTate5

Tack! I was curious and noticed the correlation and that is great to know! :)

May 2, 2019
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