"Paris is the capital of France."

Translation:Is é Páras príomhchathair na Fraince.

4 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/coreyhus
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"The capital of france is paris" was marked wrong. Couldn't it be a translation of this or would you need to switch the wording?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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In an identificational copular statement of the form “definite noun is definite noun.”, the subject is put before the predicate — so Páras, the subject, will come first.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
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Why is é necessary, why is there no an before príomhchathair, and why na instead of an?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonDunne2

Cities are masculine and countries feminine? I wrote Is í Páras.....etc

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laura88133
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I thought í too

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edidelon
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The place of é does not make sense. Why is it right after é? There were many examples in the course where é was placed elsewhere. There ia no logical or intuitive way of understanding it. I wonder if Duolingo is not a big waste of time

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
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Placenames are definite nouns, and you need é between is and a definite noun.

It is both logical and intuitive, or people wouldn't have been able to use this type of construction for centuries without formal education.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edidelon
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No, there is nothing logical and intuitive about it. Il is just the way the Irish say things. Anyway I was not referring to the language per se but to the method used by Duolingo in which a learner is supposed to understand a grammar rule with 2 or 3 examples introduced rather randomly with no explanation at all. Well it doesn’t work especially for Irish, probably europe’s most dificult language.

1 week ago
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