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"Es tu mitad."

Translation:It is your half.

5 years ago

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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why is the 'd' of mitad not pronounced? At least I did not hear it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Balaur
Balaur
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I hear it (even though it's a bit cut off). It's just a matter of getting used to this sound in Spanish. Remember, it's not pronounced like a 'd' in English here, but something closer to the 'th' in 'this', though with the tongue not quite touching the teeth, but rather hovering just under them. Because of this, it's not pronounced as strongly as the English 'th' in 'this', so it might be harder to hear. Note that in some dialects (for example in Cuba and Andalusia and other parts of Spain), this sound actually disappears completely in some environments, often between vowels, but sometimes at the end of words.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevebungay

I live in Andalucia and can vouch for what you say. and the 'd' is not the only thing that disappears, there is hardly an 's' to be heard south of Granada. It's not easy learning Spanish down here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valgal707

My dad was a Spanish teacher. One of his tricks to get better pronunciation was to think of holding a candle flame right in front of your lips and then saying the words so that the flame does not flicker.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Thank you, valgal707! Do you mean that ALL Spanish words shouldn't make the flame flicker?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valgal707

I think so. It mainly affects those explosive consonants like T and D and B. That's why T sounds like D, and B sounds like V, and D sounds like Th to English speaking ears.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

B sounds like a V? I have seen it said many times that there is no V sound in Spanish and that the V sounds like a B, both soft.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sandeepa2
sandeepa2
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valgal707 , Muchas gracias por la información. Es muy útil.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BartMilner

Although I still stumble over the pronunciation, I found this helpful from an earlier discussion (by a native speaker I think):

"...The Spanish 'b/v' and 'd' also make special sounds in this last environment (between vowels, etc.). The 'b' in 'abuela' or the 'v' in 'uva' make a sound somewhat like a 'v' in English, but with both lips almost touching, instead of your top teeth touching your bottom lip. Both 'd' sounds in 'ciudad' are pronounced similar to the English 'th' in 'this'. "

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MegBlack

Try learning Spanish in Puerto Rico... the 's' is more like a silent breath. Screws me up every time.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lhmckown

In Panama, como esta sounds like como eta.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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Thank you very much for the good explanation!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shaunsmile
shaunsmile
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This 'd' even disappears in Mexico, but if we pronounce the word slowly it's there.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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It's a soft "d", I believe it is always the case with the "ad" ending, libertad, mitad, etc...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/verylazyguy

I didn't hear it either and it made it sound like the most authentic audio I've heard on here so far. I notice a lot of words don't have their last letter pronounced by native speakers

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nanucdiana

I've learned that final d is not pronounced in all Spain, neither in -ad words, universidad, velocidad,etc, nor in other like Madrid, Valadolid, or at least is very slow like it was been explained by someone

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

There is usually a pronunciation, but you have to understand what you're listening for. Take Madrid for example. If the final -d were not pronounced at all, it would sound like it ends in an 'open-ended' sound like the English 'ee' (as in 'we').

This is occasionally the case with some speakers, but it is typically more like if you started to use an English 'th' sound (as in 'they') but stopped it before you fully formed it. The result sounds either almost like the speaker bit his tongue to end the word abruptly, or indeed an English th sound.

All that said, some speakers do drop the sound. It is just more common the case that it is described as 'dropped' because it is a very soft, muted sound (certainly not anything like what an English speaker would expect from a d). Spanish d's vary slightly depending on speaker, region, and placement in the word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I didn't hear the "d" either. (And I don't know why. Is it a computer "glitch" or a particular accent?)

I just guessed at the word because it came up elsewhere in the lesson.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimijimmy

It sounds like the audio actually got cut off before "mitad" was fully pronounced, when the voice was beginning to say the "th" sound of "d"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brigid
Brigid
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As our fellow learners have already shared some great descriptions of the soft "d" sound in Spanish, I won't add my own. ;-)

However, I must mention that StudySpanish.com has very useful information about pronunciation. The included oral exercises have been a big help to me!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/charlesvanduren

To me it sounded like an "r"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthiasL

how was i supposed to know that it's "it" and not he or she?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Well, true that Es is the third person singular conjugation of ser, so it could be "él" "ella" "Ud." or "It" I think the assumption was that mitad refers to a thing and, thus, "It" in English. It's very common for Es alone at the beginning of a sentence to be translated to "It's" (which is quite difficult to explain to beginning learners of English).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CesarRivGar
CesarRivGar
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Well, but as spanish learners, we should know that using "he", "it", "she" are all correct in this case, this is an error from Duolingo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

There are two ways to go here, as I see it.

One, we could argue that "he/she is your half" makes no sense. Similarly, we could assert that "you are your half" also makes no sense. Thus, "it" is the only logical choice.

Or, two, we could argue that no sentence needs to "make sense" on Duolingo. I think we've all seen nonsense and assume the point is to understand the underlying grammar and usage. In fact, I personally believe nonsense phrases force us to understand what we're reading and translating better than so-called useful phrases/sentences, which can usually be guessed correctly with only partial knowledge.

I tend to favor the latter path and for that reason feel Duo needs to accept all grammatically correct translations that could make sense with proper context. Now, if someone can just suggest the context for "You are your half" ....

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gehayi
Gehayi
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Couldn't they solve this problem by expanding on the sentence a bit? Like "Es tu mitad del botín"? (Or "de la tarta" if Duolingo didn't want to talk about loot.) It's unlikely that anyone would get confused and think that "es" meant "he is" or "she is" then.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cams11

'He' is in the definition list so I used it and got it wrong. I reported it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sillabando
sillabando
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Why "he is your half" is not valid????? There is an unclear subject!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeghanaRaw

I realize that it sounds weird, but I also said "he is your half". Technically shouldn't that be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

"He is your half?" What does that mean?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lu10017

He is your soulmate! :))

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ana_delrey

Could this be used when talking about people? I don't know if the sentence makes sense in english OR spanish, but saying this in portuguese can have both (1): a loving connotation (you've find the right girl/guy) and (2): "this is your half of the orange/apple" etc. (hope I've made myself clear D: )

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pborika

why not she is your half? or he?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Please see comment by MatthiasL above and my reply.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pborika

thank you!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lonewolf969

@pborika looks like gender is not mentioned here. El,La,Ella, E(^). Es might be for general assumption.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoolSkeleton95

I helped rescue the Princess! I did half the work, I get half the booty! Now hand over that big rock, the one that looks like your head!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bone3011
bone3011
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When should I use "mitad" and when "la mitad"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Batata

so mitad cannot be used to say He/She is your half (as soulmate etc..)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itwing
itwing
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You can use it. But we have a special sentence to say that . Él es mi media naranja. O él es mi alma gemela

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jewelbrambles

I think I must be translating the first sentence wrong because I am coming up with "he is my orange half." or "he is my half orange" ? Pero, Me gusta segundo frase.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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Letter "d" hardly sounds at the end of Spanish words. When it does, it is not "plosive" like the English /d/, but "fricative" (tongue between teeth and air going out slowly) /θ /, like in "bath" /bɑːθ /.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ank_S

I don't know where, but I saw that mitad could mean wife/husband.

Like: 'She is your wife' for this sentence.

Is it correct??

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I'm guessing you saw something like "better half," which is a common expression used in English to describe one's partner. I believe the Spanish idiom is something like otra mitad. Without something to represent "better," I don't think it works as a colloquialism for one's spouse.

At least one other comment in this thread suggests that "half" all by itself could refer to a partner, but I've never seen that usage and don't believe that's a correct interpretation.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/themfwhip

Why is it not 'es su mitad'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/horvathdavid

Because es su mitad can mean "it is his/her or you (formal). --> It is his half, her half or your (formal). Es tu mitad only mean your (informal) half.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A.E.Meadows

What would "It is half yours," be in Spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itwing
itwing
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Es medio tuyo. But I need an example, is not an usual phrase.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Artemis_Fowl

It's your half what? Body? Brother? Sister?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Jhon, your half of whatever "thing" the context was about, in a conversation anteriormente. It could be coffebean crop, or coins, a sandwich - literally anything one may divide. I wouldn't use it for a "she" or "he," except in the idiomatic saying where a guy or gal introduces his or her spouse as "my better half."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngarrang
ngarrang
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That whole silent 'd' thing makes it very difficult to learn the words. I could swear the voice said 'meta', thus making the sentence "Es tu meta" (It is your goal), which to me sounded like a perfectly normal sentence.

And since DL has a habit of introducing words into the quizzes that were never introduced previously, I naturally accepted 'meta' to be the word spoken.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Balaur
Balaur
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Well, even if it's hard to hear the 'd' in this recording, the first vowel is different between these two words, as is the stress (which should give away that there's most likely supposed to be some consonant at the end). That being said, it's quite natural to mishear words that are similar in some way, especially until you become familiar with them and hear them enough times to able to reliably distinguish them. As frustrating as it is, it's good practice, and makes you more aware of the differences, particularly if it makes you want to look up the pronunciation on Forvo.com or some online dictionary with sound recordings. I've definitely experienced this more times than I'd like to admit (particularly in the Danish course).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keithterri

why not "It is your middle." ?? The drop down says that middle is a valid transliteration of mitad.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Parmachella

I readi all of the many comments, and perhaps missed one, so I comment, that despite the dropping of the percussive terminal "d" sound being customary, the male speaker for DL pronounces the termi al "d" as an "l" sound, consistently, noted in other lessons. The female speaker habitually joins vowel sounds, but I cannot recall the instances right now. It is usually when a preceding word ends with the same vowel sound as the following word begins with. She then marries the two into one word. This is the way a native language is spoken vs written.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina316538

any tips for remembering the word mitad=half?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott101822
Scott101822
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Can't mitad also mean middle?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ank_S

It can be

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoStingo

I said it is your middle and got it wrong. Why?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T_Late
T_Late
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When I read this sentence, I thought to myself "It is your middle" as in "it is your abdominal area" (which isn't such a weird interpretation after watching your little nephew dance to a song that says "put your hands to your top; put your hands to your middle"). SO, I wrote "it is your middle" and was marked wrong. Is this wrong? If so, how would I translate "it is your middle" into Spanish in the way I indicated here? Thanks!

8 months ago