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  5. "Möt våren i Stockholm!"

"Möt våren i Stockholm!"

Translation:Meet spring in Stockholm!

December 25, 2014

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skullcap

...is this some kind of thing to encourage tourism?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

Ssh, we’re being heavily sponsored by Skansen. Why else did you think there are so many sentences about animals?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/So1ovei

Watch out for the wolves!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annikajns

And the slightly unnerving wooden bear...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FionaBrown8

That explains the turtles, what about strawberries? :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElizaLanga

What does this really mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucas_Marcel

Spring must be nice there and they want you to see it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KayTurk

I think in English we would say "Greet the Spring" . Not a direct translation at all, but we would not say "Meet the Spring". Greet the spring is a bit old fashioned and poetic, though. "Welcome" might be more up to date...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Byx-

I was expecting this to be a reference to some famous Swedish poem, but it looks like the moderator consensus is shrugs digitally


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/espekia

Does this mean "Spring has arrived/is here in Stockholm"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Good question. Late answer: I don't think it does. It could imply that, but it really only means that you should "experience spring" in Stockholm. It's the kind of thing you could see in a travel agency ad, where they might offer you to book a trip to Stockholm in the spring. You might book your trip in December, when spring definitely hasn't arrived yet, and only travel here in May when it has.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Q_C

Maybe it's just where I'm from but this sounds very unnatural to me, I see other people seem to have relatively little issue with it and relate it to tourism but if I saw either the Swedish or English sentence I would be very confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahferroin7

Outside of a tourism context, most people I know would be too. And even then, 'greet', 'welcome', or even 'experience' would be more common than 'meet' in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fVJYP11G

Not you, it makes zero sense in English, even in a travel context. A travel agent might use 'Enjoy Spring in Stockholm' or 'Visit Stockholm in the Springtime!' but this? Pah. No way. This only works where 'spring' is a person i.e. Meet Bruce Springsteen in Stockholm. That makes sense. Otherwise, no.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tcb1000

This does not make sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguistic_Bot

Just think of it as a travel advertisement


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew421906

I did. It was snowing. ⛄


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris-Butler

Does this mean "Visit Stockholm in the spring" eller "Embrace the spring while in Stockholm"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Could be either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesMorga430495

What the hell does this sentence mean? what type of springs do they use in Stockholm that makes them so impressive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Q_C

Well this is Spring as in the season, which makes it even more confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Clint_

Yeah, this one is above my head too. Makes no sense to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuliusSebregts

Why doesn't "the" spring work here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It does - we accept that as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/June889896

What an odd sentence. Do we say that in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tentsmuir

Never heard it. Very odd


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexander615812

Glad to hear it. This sentence should be removed, as it does not represent correct English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanHaywar10

It's still here and it's still a grammatical nightmare


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ciober1

While this may be grammatically correct I don't think someone ever used this sentence in English. I believe this kind of ambiguous structures are not actually helpful for learners as we will likely never encounter them in real life but can be rather confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yeah, the sentence is marked for removal from the next tree version.

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