"Ett vitt pulver"

Translation:A white powder

December 26, 2014

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Paularizing

Duo

September 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nickd717

Been waiting for this one! This will be key when I go to Sweden on a "skiing" trip.

December 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Jan-Olav

Surely they are talking about baking powder :)

January 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TimothyAspeslagh

I'm in love with the coco

April 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris-Butler

I take it this is hidden away here because it may be too obvious to have an entire dedicated 'drugs' lesson?!

June 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Albrechtion

They really should have found a way to hide it in the household lesson, so that when the cops come, they can quickly throw it down the toilet.

July 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ninady1980

This one should be easy to remember because of the English verb 'pulverise', which means to reduce something to a powder.

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

Tack! Great memory aid!

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/HoroTanuki

speaking of, did you know that flour is explosive?

August 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Baba7249

Question on the recording: the entire stress here seems to be on "vit" with none at all on the following "pulver". Isn't that unusual in Swedish?

September 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Texan-Paul

I put "one white powder" but duo was not keen on that.

February 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Added that now.

February 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/MintyNinja41

I remember watching footage of the first moon landing, and Neil Armstrong said something like "[the ground]...is like a powder..." So the phrase itself isn't necessarily incorrect, this is a very well known native speaker.

November 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zsguthy

Is "powder" actually countable in Swedish ? a powder is certainly wrong in English

August 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Yes, and it's fine in English as well. "Powder" can be both countable and uncountable, depending on the meaning.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SerafimaJo

For me, "a powder" sounds really wrong in English. Could someone explain to me what I am missing here?

August 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

I was going to write some examples but I think the usage on Wikipedia's article on powders is a lot better than what I was going to come up with. :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powder_(substance)

August 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SerafimaJo

Thank you for your help! :)

August 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zsguthy

That article still only uses "a powder is..." in the definition of the word sense, without the adjective, and it is a very sloppy contraction for "a kind of" or something similar. But powder is still a "material" of infinite little pieces, you need a measurement unit to count it if it stands alone as an object. Otherwise how much is one powder? (a vial of or a heap of, etc...)

It would be fine as a predicative part in a full sentence, like ..sugar is a white powder that... but it is a very different use of the indefinite article.

August 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Wiktionary: "powder ‎(countable and uncountable, plural powders)"

I've seen this discussion in another thread as well, and natives confirmed that it's fine.

August 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ninady1980

Something might be "ground to a powder" (i.e. pulverised, btw). Or, "the police found an envelope containing a white powder". I'm a native UK English speaker and it doesn't sound wrong to me at all.

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/actualblobfish

"A powder" in English is just used as a general thing, isn't it? One type of powder; for example, the sentence "There is a strange powder on the floor." It doesn't specify an amount of powder, eg. "100 grams", but a number of powders - in the example above, there is only one strange powder on the floor, not several different ones. As a native UK English speaker, "a powder" makes perfect grammatical sense. The way you are phrasing it makes it sound as if you think "a powder" should refer to a measurement. It doesn't; it refers to a general amount of one type of powder.

November 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Well, here's another made-up example.

- Could you hand me a white powder, please?
- There are three white powders on the table. Which one do you want?
- Any of them.

August 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

Native english speaker here. Just clarifying (and seconding) that zsguthy is 100% wrong on this issue! Devalanteriel and actualblobfish are spot on.

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zsguthy

NO. It is very very sloppy even if it is allowed which I doubt. You should say Hand me the white power, some, a {unit} of or one of the ...

And it is 3 of some units of powder on the table not 3 powders, so you would refer to that.

August 11, 2016
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