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https://www.duolingo.com/Adam1995

Is it normal for relatively new speakers to get tongue tied?

When I speak spanish alot of times I can find myself to get pretty tongue tied if I am speaking a somewhat unfamiliar and medium to longer length sentence. (yes i know that doesn't make much since but I didn't know how else to describe it) Usually if I do get tongue tied it is really bad but when I do not get tongue tied the sentences just roll right off my tongue.

5 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mitcorb

If I could just learn to roll those r's. :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DonnaMarie

As a speech language pathologist I can say that often our thoughts are ahead of our production abilities. Oh yes, and even the Scots have a slightly rolled r. I had to be corrected though for using a Spanish/Italian "r" in singing Scottish songs. Their r is just a tap and I have to remind myself not to overdo it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusse
Dusse
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Yes, it's normal. It still happens to me occasionally, even though I speak fluent Spanish.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fuonk
fuonk
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Not to mention those rr's. :-) I studied French when I was a kid, and the French 'r' is very different from either ere or erre in Spanish.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siebolt
siebolt
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@ Mitcorb: When I was learning Italian I asked a friend of mine how to pronounce the Italian tongue tip -r (rolling -r). She gave me an exercise. Say a lot of times "kti, kta, kto, ktu, kte", and "gdi, gda etc. After a week of gibberishing you move to "pti, pta etc and "bdi. bda etc". After a week of that you try the rolling -r. It helped me tremendously although I cannot keep the sound up for a long time.

5 years ago