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  5. "Ele corta o pão."

"Ele corta o pão."

Translation:He cuts the bread.

July 20, 2013

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RDCloe

at least it's not cheese....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sterrenstofje

Does anyone have any tricks to hear the difference between 'um' and 'o' when it's pronounced quickly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanKwee

"He slices the bread" is accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PHScanes

It's ok, but it's better for "ele fatia o pão"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamaraR

Shouldn't "He cuts up the bread" be accepted too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I think the difference between "cut" and "cut up" is that "cut up" is to cut into (small) pieces like for a Savoyarde cheese fondue. Is it correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twippet

It should also accept he cuts bread.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erreinessaaula

Nope. The phrase has an article 'o', so it must have a 'the' in the translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictorTheLead

Cuts up should be accepted, because it's usually the same translation to PT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alfadog1

Some Portuguese words for food seem heavily influenced by Spanish? Paõ has no n but I seem to hear him say pan. Leite has no ch but I hear leche.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wowpow2300

Portuguese and Spanish are very similar, as they both came from a type of Vulgar Latin. But Portguese is also very different. Think of it as like Spanish's half-brother. Am I right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brianda7

The "t" in Portuguese sounds like "ch". When t is between two vowels it turns into a ch sound. Leite sounds like "lei-chi", tomate is "to-ma-chi".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erreinessaaula

This also occurs when the t is isolate. For example, ponte is like pon-tchi. It is valid for Brazilian Portuguese, but I don't know about the other accents.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raymond704692

Re: "cuts up". It has a number of context related meanings. 1. Destroy. 2. Chop into small pieces for an infant or person with chewing difficulties. 3. Overtake dangerously in a motor vehicle. 4. To be "cut up" about something means to be emotional or upset.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keyur_Shah

When do we use 'o' and 'os'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanKwee

"o" = singular = o homem = the man

"os" = plural = os homens = the men


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreson13428

quando estamos no plural os artigos ou numerais tbm ficam no plural, exemplo: os pães, as bolas, umas cadeiras...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shmc1234

What about "He cuts/is cutting bread," without the definite article?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanKwee

I've noticed that without the definite article, Portuguese follows the same rules as English. Therefore, "He cuts/is cutting bread" = "Ele corta pão". But I'm not an expert, so I might be wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bencain92

Would it be "Ele corta pão" to say "he cuts bread?" Or would you also have to put the "o" article in front of the noun in that situation too? I'm having trouble picking up on any kind of pattern when it comes to putting articles in front of nouns in Portuguese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonathanWexler

When is it CortA vs CortO? Clearly not in relationship to the object being cut.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanKwee

It's a conjugation of the verb.

For example:

I cut = Eu corto

You cut = você corta

He cuts = ele corta


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreson13428

pra gente o verbo muda de acordo o pronome, exemplo: eu corto, tu cortas, ele corta, nós cortamos vós cortais, eles cortam.

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