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"Ar úsáid sibh an chosaint?"

Translation:Did you use the protection?

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen_87
Stephen_87
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So many innuendos in these lessons...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/larryone
larryone
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In your end-o

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brandon87199

Tá triail déanta uaim...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina462140
Nina462140
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Is cosaint used to refer to birth control, the way "protection" is in English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

As a general rule, any idiom that probably came into widespread use in English within the 20th century can be assumed to have been adopted by bi-lingual Irish speakers, and will tend to have exactly the same shades of meaning as it does in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eard_Stapa
Eard_Stapa
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If it is, I'm curious why the suggested sentence uses "sibh"....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brandon87199

it would mean they're talking to the couple who may or may not have used protection.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucy833274

It takes two to tango! ;-)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

This selection would appear to illustrate the speaker's habit of consonant lending.

Ar úsáid comes out as A rúsáid in her accent.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

There is no "consonant lending" here - or at least your perception of such is happening in your ear, rather than in the speakers mouth.

Here's a description from Gramadach na Gaeilge of "the Irish way of speaking":

the words of a sentence are pulled together and spoken without a pause. Pauses are almost always avoided, and some sentences seem so as if spoken as a single word. (there seems to be a quasi "horror vacui" = a fear of nothingness.)
The individual words affect each other in pronunciation (what is generally known as "Sandhi"), similar as it occurs in French (called there "liaison" , comp.: les amis [lezami]), in order to enable this unhindered flow of speech. On the other hand, in German there is a short pause made after almost every word so that the beginnings and ends of the words remain seperate and unchanged. It's important to note that those words in German beginning in a vowel actually don't begin with a vowel sound but a glottal stop, which is not the case in Irish.

(http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/sindos.htm)

What this comes down to is that the normal pronunciation of ar úsáid for an Irish speaker (not just this speaker) is "eroosawd", without a break between the words. If your brain is assigning the "r" sound to one of two separate words, that's a reflection of what your brain is used to hearing, rather than an objective assessment of what this speakers is actually saying.

Here's a direct link to the audio for this exercise - if you slow it down you can hear that there isn't any gap between the words. https://d7mj4aqfscim2.cloudfront.net/tts/ga/sentence/d5e0087907c25452d438b508d37789a2

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

Thank you. That was a detailed explanation, and I'm glad to learn the word 'Sandhi' which is more apt an explanation than 'consonant borrowing'. And yes, Irish phonology is distinctly different from American, which does create a gap between the speaker's and listener's minds.

I'm still waiting for that aha moment when I intuitively integrate what I'm learning into something more than Dr. Seuss' level of literacy. That process would appear to be hampered by another factor beyond the differences between Irish dialects and the physical distance between most of the US and the closest gaeltacht. (That is a place in Ontario which is roughly the size of a postage stamp and is 1500 km or 14 hours by car from Nashville.)

Trouble is there are so many non-Irish pronunciations floating around out there it is hard to sort out the real ones. RTE and YouTube both seem to have many speakers who sound reasonably understandable. However there are too many speakers who would appear to be speaking pidgin Irish, others going so far as to have developed a full blown creolization of the language.

Some of the more popular ones appear to be the worst - what would be the Irish word for "valley girl"?

This gets confusing in terms of them using English syntax as well as borrowing words and having English accents, but I suppose in 100 years theirs will be the dominant form of the language. I'd say that this is active language evolution taking place as we watch, similar to what happened to the old Tejano families from San Antonio and the French of Louisiana.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

I find it a bit offensive that you would criticise the quality of other peoples spoken Irish. in the same post that you admit to not even being aware of the role of "sandhi" in Irish phonology, and only having a Dr. Seuss' level of literacy.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rev._mother

You really have to ask yourself whether you are helping people learn the Irish language or driving people away. He points out the difficulty in distinguishing the two words and you shame him for not being familiar with sandhi. Why?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

Thank you Reverend mother, but I'm shameless. :^)

And, as I am also a student of human nature I realize there are people who come across well in chat rooms and some who don't.

There are many learning styles so we'll need to wait a couple of years and see what happens to our Irish conversational skills. Remember Einstein couldn't talk until he was five and then no one could shut him up.

And we can live for the day when our friend listens to some of the terrible Irish on YouTube (where resides the bulk of Irish in the US) and prints a retraction here. ;^)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

Yes, I'd agree that it is easy to become offended on the internet, particularly when the the context of the other's statements is not immediately available. But I've never pretended to be anything but a beginner here, so you can't accuse me of suddenly 'admitting' it. ;^)

To give context for anyone who stumbles onto this discussion, I'd challenge them to visit You Tube or RTE looking for the variation of the speech, not just the accents but the number of béarlachas. I won't post the links, since there are so many you won't have trouble finding them.

---> since that post 19 hours ago is at the limit of allowable thread depth I'll answer here. Bandwidth and website format make YouTube easier to sample than the original RTE channel. And there are other channels. Search terms for YouTube would be ones such as: TG4 as Gaeilge, RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta, et cetera. You can decide for yourself after a few hours of checking them out. I didn't make the reference to "valley girls" by mistake. You'll see a wide variation of accents, grammar and the number of Béarlachas inserted.

And, since I am a beginner and you have studied the language much longer than me I'd value your opinions about what is found.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Apart from some programs for pre-schoolers, the only Irish language content available on the US version of the RTÉ TV player is An Nuacht.

I think that if you're going to be commenting on the quality of other people's Irish, you should put your money where your mouth is, and tell us who, in your opinion, is using "non-Irish pronunciations" in Irish language programming on on RTÉ.

6 months ago