"Arúsáidsibhanchosaint?"

Translation:Did you use the protection?

4 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen_87
Stephen_87
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6

So many innuendos in these lessons...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/larryone
larryone
  • 23
  • 18
  • 15
  • 6
  • 2
  • 1211

In your end-o

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brandon87199

Tá triail déanta uaim...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

This selection would appear to illustrate the speaker's habit of consonant lending.

Ar úsáid comes out as A rúsáid in her accent.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 25
  • 955

There is no "consonant lending" here - or at least your perception of such is happening in your ear, rather than in the speakers mouth.

Here's a description from Gramadach na Gaeilge of "the Irish way of speaking":

the words of a sentence are pulled together and spoken without a pause. Pauses are almost always avoided, and some sentences seem so as if spoken as a single word. (there seems to be a quasi "horror vacui" = a fear of nothingness.)
The individual words affect each other in pronunciation (what is generally known as "Sandhi"), similar as it occurs in French (called there "liaison" , comp.: les amis [lezami]), in order to enable this unhindered flow of speech. On the other hand, in German there is a short pause made after almost every word so that the beginnings and ends of the words remain seperate and unchanged. It's important to note that those words in German beginning in a vowel actually don't begin with a vowel sound but a glottal stop, which is not the case in Irish.

(http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/sindos.htm)

What this comes down to is that the normal pronunciation of ar úsáid for an Irish speaker (not just this speaker) is "eroosawd", without a break between the words. If your brain is assigning the "r" sound to one of two separate words, that's a reflection of what your brain is used to hearing, rather than an objective assessment of what this speakers is actually saying.

Here's a direct link to the audio for this exercise - if you slow it down you can hear that there isn't any gap between the words. https://d7mj4aqfscim2.cloudfront.net/tts/ga/sentence/d5e0087907c25452d438b508d37789a2

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

Thank you. That was a detailed explanation, and I'm glad to learn the word 'Sandhi' which is more apt an explanation than 'consonant borrowing'. And yes, Irish phonology is distinctly different from American, which does create a gap between the speaker's and listener's minds.

I'm still waiting for that aha moment when I intuitively integrate what I'm learning into something more than Dr. Seuss' level of literacy. That process would appear to be hampered by another factor beyond the differences between Irish dialects and the physical distance between most of the US and the closest gaeltacht. (That is a place in Ontario which is roughly the size of a postage stamp and is 1500 km or 14 hours by car from Nashville.)

Trouble is there are so many non-Irish pronunciations floating around out there it is hard to sort out the real ones. RTE and YouTube both seem to have many speakers who sound reasonably understandable. However there are too many speakers who would appear to be speaking pidgin Irish, others going so far as to have developed a full blown creolization of the language.

Some of the more popular ones appear to be the worst - what would be the Irish word for "valley girl"?

This gets confusing in terms of them using English syntax as well as borrowing words and having English accents, but I suppose in 100 years theirs will be the dominant form of the language. I'd say that this is active language evolution taking place as we watch, similar to what happened to the old Tejano families from San Antonio and the French of Louisiana.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 25
  • 955

I find it a bit offensive that you would criticise the quality of other peoples spoken Irish. in the same post that you admit to not even being aware of the role of "sandhi" in Irish phonology, and only having a Dr. Seuss' level of literacy.

10 months ago
Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.