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"Ella se come la manzana."

Translation:She eats the apple.

3 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dougconnah

Why reflexive, why the se?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Austin523494

The short answer is this: use se in answering a question if it is used in the original question, or to emphasize the doer of the action. Don't stress over se, as it is not at all a critical part of the grammar at this point. Leaving it off won't skew interpretation of your words. Its regular use will have to come with experience once and if you are immersed in a Spanish speaking country.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Come back, Austin, and teach us more!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Austin523494

I guess so.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amplifymysound1

thank you, this put my mind at ease. This is the reason i come and go with spanish because this stuff scares me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

It is not reflexive, but pronominal, according to my grammar book, although there is much 'discussion' about it. Using the pronoun "adds a shade of meaning." It means she ate the whole thing. A few verbs work this way. Similarly, ir = to go, irse = to go away

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex446602

Wow, the ir is exactly like in polish. exactly like in Polish.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MDaniels87
MDaniels87
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We do it in English sometimes... "Have yourself a merry little Christmas" and where I'm from (Western US) it's not uncommon to say "I'm gonna drink me a beer."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

If that's an accurate grammatical comparison (and I'm not sure that it is), I think the difference is still that in English that's commonly used incorrect grammar, and by the sound of it, in Spanish it may be commonly unused technically correct grammar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimKones

Nice.

As a native of both western US and fluent speaker of a romance language, Romanian, I believe the second example is accurate and helpful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marauder16

This works in Croatian as well, in exactly the same way. Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex446602

And in Polish! I have never noticed how much I use it.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arturo__Fuente

Everybody here has a good guess, but here is the real reason:

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/reflexive1.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SinclairJ21

Thank you for this. This actually helped clarify the use of "se" as well as several other use of words in the "object pronoun" lesson.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

Could this be a bit like when we say in English "She has herself an apple," vs. when we say "She eats the apple"? This is a sense in which I can think of it as "reflexive," although I'm not sure how I would train myself to use it on the fly.

I could also see this making sense with hacer, where "Él se hace un emparedado/sándwich/bocadillo/torta" means "He makes himself a sandwich," instead of just "Él hace un ~" for "He makes a sandwich."

Any guiding thoughts on this?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fifiita

It is more of an emphasis, but you don't need it. I've lived in Spain for five years and have never used it, I asked my friends about it and they told me it's not necessary and they never use it unless they want to emphasis the person who did the action. Hacer, comer and most verbs don't use it but these verbs are different from irse, for example. Irse has a slightly different meaning from Ir. When I say "Se va a la tienda" I'm saying "he left here to go to the shop" while "Va a la tienda" is just "he goes to the shop" There's no inclusion of where he left from... I don't know if this is helpful or just confusing, if so ignore me!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

It's helpful enough : ) Thanks!

A lot of grammar just doesn't correlate across languages; I've accepted this.

Also, I learned about the ir vs. irse distinction from another DL discussion thread, and it makes perfect sense to me!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aniczs
aniczs
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It is very helpful. Thank you

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frappejaq
frappejaq
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Wouldn't "Él se hace un emparedado" mean "He becomes a sandwich"? "Hacerse" means "to become" right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

Based on what everyone has been teaching me (in person, and in this discussion thread), "se come" is an exception to Spanish's usual grammar with reflexive "se." I'd recommend just reading everyone else's comments. In summary, "se come" is an emphasis; it sort of emphasizes the person doing the action, and implies that they consumed the entire thing.

I'm not sure about hacerse, in particular, so maybe someone else will come along and clarify that one for us.(?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kimmerkc

So would we use this form if, for example, we were answering the question "Who is eating the apple?" And the simpler form «ella come la manzana» if we were answering "What is she doing?" Because of the emphasis?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rbrtcrnwll

These explanations on se aren't helping me. Like I'm getting the answers right, but idk why...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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La vida es complicada.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jainshubham1007

What is the difference between "ella se come la manzana" and "ella come la manzana". I mean why use "se"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynnbor51

Thanks for all this discussion, it has helped.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RickPoulin

So "Ella come la manzana" is like "she eats the apple"? But "Ella se come la manzana" is like saying "SHE eats the apple"? Just emphasizing who?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Null-A
Null-APlus
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You can hear the exact same phenomenon in colloquial French : "elle s'est mangé une pomme" (se comió una manzana). As it has been explained many times already, it only adds a touch of emphasis by making the subject the main focus of the sentence. The sentence with or without has the same meaning.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BerryP

UGH! I'M confused! is duolingo using 'se' as reflexsive or as a pronoun??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

The answer is abstract, but explained all through this discussion thread. Read on, friend.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saraths8

Is this means: she eats The apple herself..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erin158782

Does that mean the apple is feminine?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabby_9815

why couldn't you just say "Ella come la manzana"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qwertyminecraft

Weird

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rodrigo671145

She eats an apple is wrong?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emieye
Emieye
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I learned from another duo thread that using 'se' roughly translates to 'she eats up the apple'. I think I'll flag it to duo so someone can have a look at it, as that answer isnt accepted. Very interesting thread anyway!

2 months ago