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"The woman is drinking water."

Translation:Die Frau trinkt Wasser.

5 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JesseRMeyer

Why is "ist" not used to describe the "is" in the English phrasing?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schiffmeister
schiffmeister
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They usually do not use the progressive. It is always like this. Die Frau trinkt Wasser is both the woman drinks water and the woman is drinking water

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/memeshift

"You used the sie/Sie form "trinken" instead of the er/sie/es form "trinkt"." Both have 'sie' but why is it supposed to be 'trinkt' instead of 'trinken'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josstin

die Frau trikt Wasser...-means the woman is drinking water but the child drinks water changes to das kind trinkt Wasser. both uses trinkt , what's the difference? please clarify

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binweg

In German there is no progressive aspect in the tenses. „…is drinking…“ and „…drinks…“ both translate to „…trinkt…“. Whether you're using present progressive or simple present for the reverse translation is a different matter and might depend on the context.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/terralux

Debatable: http://zif.spz.tu-darmstadt.de/jg-13-2/beitrag/Thiel1.htm

I find it strange that Duolingo often prefers colloquial constructions over standard ones, yet is completely unaware of the different 'Verlaufsformen', which are provably already more than a century old: http://homepage.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/Karin.Pittner/Verlaufsform1.pdf

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schiffmeister
schiffmeister
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SONmfeBL, that is an interesting article, however walking around Germany saying things like "Ich bin am Laufen" or "Ich bin am Trinken" instead of "ich laufe" or "ich trinke", would warrant a lot of strange looks. The first two are somewhat progressive forms, but the last words in each look like verbs but are really nouns. Literal translations would read "I am at walking" or "I am at drinking", noting a state that one is at, not progressing to. This is not a progressive form.

Sometimes these formulations "ich bin am Sterben" are used, but they are more rare than the indicative. In fact, they are FAR more colloquial than their more used counterparts.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josstin

thank you so much....i will be working hard for deutch.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miguel.a.o12

Deutsch *

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schiffmeister
schiffmeister
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Conjugation of she and the kid (it) is the same

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZinebHilali

why we don't use das before Wasser?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/law200300
law200300
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die,das der……confuzed@_@

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binweg

This should help to get you started: An introduction to the four German cases

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miguel.a.o12

Die for femenine, der for masculine, das for neutral

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binweg

In nominative case (“subject case”) this is true. But note that the article's inflection changes for different cases. And for example the genitive case (which is used primarily for possession) inflection of the feminine article is der:

„Die Frau kauft das Wasser.“ – “The woman buys the water.”
„Das Wasser der Frau ist kalt.“ – “The woman's water is cold.”

4 years ago