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"Hoeveel tantes en ooms heb jij?"

Translation:How many aunts and uncles do you have?

December 29, 2014

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cesarlpzdj

Since tante is also aunt in French, is this evidence that French was influenced by Germanic groups or is it the other way around?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alphathon

According to Wiktionary the French term comes from the Latin amita, while the German Tante is borrowed from French. It doesn't give an etymology for the Dutch word but I would assume it is also from French (or maybe borrowed from the German, but ultimately from Latin via French).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

Since the other Germanic languages that use "tante" for "aunt" (Danish, German, North Frisian, and Norwegian [Bokmål & Nynorsk]) have come from French, it's likely that Dutch does too. The Wiktionary page for "aunt" says that it displaced the Middle English word "modrie", which came from the Proto-Germanic "*mōdrijǭ", with descendants in Old and Middle English, Old Frisian, North Frisian and Old High German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MentalPinball

Germanic languages came from French? You mean they borrowed certain words from French, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alphathon

We're specifically talking about the word tante so yes. I don't think anyone meant to imply that the Germanic languages as a whole came from French (which is, quite frankly, ridiculous, since the group pre-dates French by more than 1000 years).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MentalPinball

That's what I thought, probably I misread what you wrote. And of course it's ridiculous, but I've 'heard' people say such nonsense on the internet that you wouldn't believe me! But my policy is to always be diplomatic and try to never start accusing people, so I just tend to act surprised (as I did above ;) ).

Thnx for your reply.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alphathon

You're not wrong; some people have some pretty strange ideas to say the least.

That's a good policy, particularly given how hard it can be to convey tone etc in text and how many people are non-native English speakers (something that I'm sure language learners appreciate more than most).

(Sorry if you thought I was accusing you of being ridiculous which I most certainly wasn't.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MentalPinball

Oh, no worries there, Alphathon, I didn't think you were hinting anything of the sort :)

Cheers!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cesarlpzdj

Interesting info. Dank je!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmaJennie

Does anyone know the etymology of 'oom'? From where did it derive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

That was a little tricky to find, but according to Etymology Online, it's related to Old English "eam", Old High German "oheim" and German "Ohm".

From there I found the Proto-Germanic root "*awahaimaz", which shows the following line of descent for Dutch, amongst others:

  • Old Dutch: *ōm
    • Middle Dutch: oom
      • Dutch: oom
        • (West Frisian: omme, omke)

References:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agewen

Lol dutch language influences so much to bahasa indonesia :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manoressy

So "om" and "tante" come from Dutch... Okay. We also use the same words in Indonesia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mslingva

I didn't have "uncle" in the cloud of words :(

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