1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Dutch
  4. >
  5. "De politie komt overmorgen."

"De politie komt overmorgen."

Translation:The police are coming the day after tomorrow.

December 29, 2014

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoatyOaty

Overmorrow means the day after tomorrow in English, however no one says it anymore.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El2theK

Like you said, nobody uses it any more. Even dictionaries don't include it any more, hence it would not make any sense to include it.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoatyOaty

Yeah, I wasn't expecting it to be added, I just thought it would be interesting for people to know!

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneAmanda

Indeed, I find these parallels with an older form of English fascinating and make Dutch all the more fun, because it feels mildly Shakespearean.

March 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

It would make those of us who know it smile :)

Fun fact: the Georgians seem to have everybody beat on this one; they express the concept in only three letters: ზეგ (pronounced "zeg")

April 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

I’d use it here if only for the sake of brevity.

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daddeo007

I would also say, "the police come the day after tomorrow"

December 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillofKempsey

Reported 30/12/14

December 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vanof
April 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vertederox

there is crappy movies and then... this one!

April 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StudentTaal1

Is it an acceptable abbreviation to skip "the day" and write directly "after tomorrow"?

March 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phb2013

No, that wouldn't work. "Overmorgen" means only the day after tomorrow, whereas "after tomorrow" could mean one, two, ten or twenty days after tomorrow.

August 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StudentTaal1

I see, thanks.

August 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mullac1992

Coming this fall, "OVERMORGEN" (we swear, this disaster movie will be good!)

July 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reventador

Hmm, so Dutch also has the equivalent of "pojutrze" word in Polish. :D

November 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

I’d mostly use ‘in two days’. Not an accurate translation but definitely a natural one.

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VanessaVie278527

why not "the police will come the day after tomorrow?"

July 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trebach

It's been accepted.

August 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/makimachi

There was a discussion on a different sentence about whether "The Netherlands are (...)" instead of "The Netherlands is (...)" should be accepted (because it wasn't). "The police" being singular was used as an example of why it should be "is". Here it seems that "The police are (...)" is accepted as well as "The police is (...)".

Is there a difference, or were the folk over there wrong about "The Netherlands is (...)" being the only correct answer?

October 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillofKempsey

As a Brit, I would always say "the police are" ("police" being a collective noun).

"The Netherlands", as the name of a country, is not collective. But I would still be comfortable with either "is" or "are", favouring "is" depending on context. The Netherlands is a democracy. The Netherlands are a low-lying area beside the North Sea.

October 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itkoi

I wonder if there's a word for "day before yesterday" in both Dutch and English.

November 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xMerrie

In Dutch, that would be 'eergisteren'. :)

November 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itkoi

Oh nice, thanks!

November 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

"ereyesterday" in English; but for reasons inexplicable it seems to have ever remained in a state of desuetude even more desolate than that afflicting "overmorrow."

April 6, 2017
Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.