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  5. "Os rapazes treinam no estádi…

"Os rapazes treinam no estádio."

Translation:The boys train at the stadium.

July 21, 2013

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grantwhite

"the boys 'practice' in the stadium" was not accepted. Practice is correct in UK English as far as I know, unless I am missing something it should be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

"Practice" has been accepted for a while now (possibly because of your reports/comments). Thank you for helping us make this course better :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/victor89

does the word "rapazes" have the same bad connotation as "rapariga"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Rapariga is for women and rapazes for young men. Where I live rapariga has a negative connotation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rob906617

for those who are etymology eggheads, according to the wonderful resource: http://www.aulete.com.br , the word derives from the Latin rapax, to seize or take by force which is the source for rapacious or rape. It is interesting that it does NOT have a negative connotation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaferGouveia

Rapez and rapariga are commonly used in Portugal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PHScanes

Rapaz is common in Brasil too, for a teenager boy or a young man, but "rapariga" has an offensive meaning here and could be replaced for moça...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iamjeff7

is "rapazes" a synonym of "meninos"? Or is "meninos" only used for young boys, and perhaps "rapazes" is more like an informal "homens"-- like "guys" in english?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d.hylton

I think rapaza and rapazo means teenagers as opposed to boys and girls


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

the correct word is rapaz and is used only for young men. There is not this term for young women.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurangeG

Can treinar be "work out" or never?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

That's a great question, and it might linger on whether or not someone considers working out something akin to "training" (in the sense of getting better at a certain skill/sport vs. getting your body fit for whatever reason). Some people might use the term "treinar" when they go to the gym twice a week, but I don't think it's a correct descriptor of such activity, since "treinar" usually has a secondary purpose (to train yourself to do something else, or to gain the endurance to perform that other activity) guiding the activity.

Long story short: Working out is part of the training, but not the training itself (or not just).

"Fazer exercício" ou "Malhar" (in Brazil only) are better terms for "working out".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhillipBro6

While this may technically be true, most of my friends in Brazil use treinar when talking about their exercise routines. Acabei de treinar. - I just finished my workout.

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