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  5. "Jag arbetar."

"Jag arbetar."

Translation:I work.

December 30, 2014

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/figure.8.

Arbetar sounds alot like the German word, "arbiten" I'm not sure if that's spelled correctly they both of these words mean working, is working, works, or work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

Yes, the Swedish word was borrowed from Low German some 600 years ago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ViArSkoldpaddor

It's spelled "Arbeiten"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Weird_Ed

This spescific word might come from German, but the vast majority of the Swedish language comes from Old Norse - which is a Germanic language by itself, so it is natural that there are many words in Swedish that remind their German equivalents (and also the English ones, such as Bok=book, Syster=sister, Hus=house etc...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

Yep. And with English, on top of the shared ancestry, there's also tons of borrowings from the Vikings coming over in the 9th century


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrLeopold

In Dutch we replaced this verb by "werken", which is more like "to work" in English. But if you use compositions like "work insurance", it's "arbeidsverzekering"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nahuatl1939

Arbeiten = to work - Die Arbeit = the work


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lostdrewid

fun fact: the Japanese word for a part time job is アルバイト, which is a direct transliteration of the same German word that gave Swedish arbetar. I love it when words in such vastly different languages have the same etymological roots.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sweater-strypes

My German's working rather helpfully for me here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trysalandra

Is "jag" more often pronounced like "ya" rather than "yog?" The fast and slow versions of this sentence sound different from one another.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlPolyglot

Yes. When people speak in normal, fast speed it's pronounced ''ya''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TwinTip

Я работаю

Well I think it sounds similar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clayton405368

Work work... Zug zug... Dabu...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Damirmmmm

What's the difference between arbetar and jobbar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

Jobbar is more colloquial


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luxcyol

I tought that "work" was "att jobba"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mesvensson

Jobba is more informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akhilesh_josi

How we should say "I am a worker" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Jag är en arbetare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoyunmyoun

In German, "Dienst" is a worker in Government (the departments and the army) "Arbeit" means the others.

I wonder if Swedish has the same thing as I've mentioned above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReginaBetty

That make sense. Dienen in German means "to serve" - so (correct me if I'm wrong) Dienst is used for Government because it implies that the worker is a civil "servant."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

The worker in a government department might be called a "tjänsteman", coming from "tjänst", which has the same history as German "Dienst".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nahuatl1939

ich arbeite in German. The verb is Arbeiten . The work is Die Arbeit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria_Karam

Pronunciation question: In both phrases "Djur arbetar inte" and "Arbetar du?", the voice seems to be emphasising on the first syllable (on A). But in "Jag arbetar" emphasis seems to be on the second syllable (on E). Is there a different pronunciation used in question/negative form in comparison to affirmative? (Tack in advance for your answers)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

It should always be on the first syllable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kimkonex

When I listen to "arbetar" alone i hear arbEtar but in a sentence it is arbIEtar. Is it just something with the girl's voice or that is an actual thing in swedish

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