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"Lo pongo."

Translation:I put it.

5 years ago

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gleantheaspect

Upvote if you've never said this ever.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrben83
mrben83
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It´s not a full sentence, but it is a good building block. ie. "lo pongo aquí/allí/sobre la mesa"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
MrHazard
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Duolingo's usual strategy when giving us an incomplete sentence or clause is not to have a full stop at the end. This sentence has a full stop. Therefore we take it as a complete sentence. Which it isn't (sic) :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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You could argue that it is a complete sentence. It has a subject, verb, and object, and if we replaced "put" with one of its synonyms it sounds fine: "I place/position/deposit it." The problem is that in English "put" is a verb that just sounds unnatural without additional information.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
MrHazard
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Good point. But the definition of "put" is to "move to or cause to be in a specified place or position" (Oxford dictionary). Without the specified place, the word itself does not work.

Some of the words you suggest don't necessarily need a specified place; i.e., you can deposit a cheque or rip it up or sign it: "What did you do with the cheque?" I deposited it." But "I put it" has no meaning without a specified place.

This makes it an unusual irregular verb in that it requires us to name the place we are putting something. "Where did I put it?" means "In what place did you put it?" If someone answered that question with, "I just put it," you'd be right to be irritated. More detail please!—"Oh, I deposited it/put it in the drawer" etc.

BTW, some of the other words you suggest have a similar issue. "Place" (as a verb) means to put in a particular spot, so "I place it" runs the same risk, though it might have more meaning (especially a horse that "placed" etc.) but it's awkward to say the least.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
MrHazard
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Heh-heh. Ingenious for sure. But if anyone answered "I put it" to your question," it stills leave a big hole in the meaning. "I put it"—what?— "off until tomorrow/in the wrong car/all over the garage floor"? It still needs a particular place to go with "put"!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

Anyway, I go with MrHazard's argument. Just because it has a subject, a verb, and and an object doesn't make it a sentence when it's not complete by itself (no complete thought), therefore, meaningless. As Oxford Dictionary defines "put" (MrHazard's reference), to move to or cause to be in a specific place or position, the absence of that specific place or position makes the word meaningless in this string of words. Oh, well... :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdickson123

It seems like you're referring to transitive/intransitive verbs. Quick review:

(1) transitive verb: requires a direct object e.g. "I hit the ball." "They want a horse."

(2) intransitive verb: does NOT require a direct object e.g. "My mom works." "Fred drank."


The thing is, you don't have to use a noun as a direct object. Pronouns (e.g. "I," "you," "he," "she," "them") and infinitives (e.g. "Bob loves TO TALK") also very commonly fill the role of direct object.

Do you see where this is going?

In the sentence "I put it," these are the parts of speech: --subject: "I" --verb (predicate): "put" --direct object: "it"

Therefore, although it still sounds wrong, "put" DOES work as a grammatically correct action verb. "Place" does, too.

This is very basic grammar. You probably already know all of it.

Please upvote this if it helped clarify anything. I want to know how many people found this kind of thing helpful, for future reference.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdickson123

Yeah, the antecedent of the pronoun "it" would be "oil."

However, I personally would answer "I do" to the question "Who puts oil in your car?"

The English language is so complicated that sometimes the right answer to a problem seems like the most unnatural solution.

By the way, I have absolutely no idea why the first two lines of my post above are gigantic. Maybe it has something to do with the dividers I used? Sorry, everybody.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnHatchell

We can label this as a grammatically correct but nonsensical sentence in English but that misses the big question. What does this sentence mean in Spanish? Does it mean "I put it down", some other meaning, or is it meaningless and incomplete like in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ticktricktrack

Oh you're wrong, I put it just now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lulubeck
lulubeck
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I've never said this ever. However, ESL students often say it, and I have to ask, "put it where?" But the question is, is it good Spanish? If not, it still is a good sentence starter, and reminds you of the first person form of poner.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/and.kelley.love

It exists in some dialects of English :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RatInAMaze

Example?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shc327

I had a good laugh when i saw your comment and so totally ageed with it:-) I deliberately used another translation b/c this one seemed so wrong!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertMurp
RobertMurp
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If asked "what about the alarm" could you answer "lo pongo"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
MrHazard
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Just a guess, but I imagine you could if you want to say you turned it on.

Here's a couple of sentences from the webpage I quoted above: "A veces lo pongo muy fuerte" (Sometimes I have it on too loud) and "Está bien, yo se lo pongo." (Here, wait a minute. I'll put it on.) This last is a loose translation but I think it gets closer to the meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeSabo

Why is "I give it" graded as incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L4D2

I tried that too. The first option for pongo in the list was "give" but it was marked wrong :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CherylWagner

Ditto for me - Plus I give it makes more sense to me than the others - and based on the previous discussions, I rest my case.......

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesorton

I think it should be correct. Here in Spain you here people all the time in shops saying "pongame" as in pongame pan, give me bread. Ponga is from the same verb poner. Sorry I can't explain it any better than that as my English is crap.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Your reply was perfect English and it got your point across. Thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

I typed "I give it" in Spanishdict.com. I was expecting it to come up with the "dar" form for give. I was wrong. It came up with "doy". But, when I typed in "give" (which is a very long list) it took a while for me to find "poner" being used. Here is what it shows:
(state) [+name, age, address] dar; (on form) poner to give the right/wrong answer dar la respuesta correcta/equivocada if I may give an example si se me permite dar or poner un ejemplo; he gave the cause of death as asphyxia señaló la asfixia como causa de la muerte"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
MrHazard
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It seems "Lo pongo" (as indicated by others on this forum) is pretty versatile. See here: http://context.reverso.net/translation/spanish-english/lo+pongo

I just finished a lesson with an Argentinian Spanish speaker. She used "Lo pongo" to mean "decide on" as in, "Quiero que recuerdes que el precio lo pongo yo" (I want you to remember that I decide on the price").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ma5ticore
ma5ticore
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Reported it 5/11/15. It should be considered as correct or be removed from the popup, if it's not.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Roughly, it means "I put it there/down/away" in response to a question or direction. You need context to make this understandable.

I verified this with my beloved wife after hearing it in dialogue and conversations.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raezur
raezur
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Can someone explain to me why "I give it" is wrong? This is my first sentence in this lesson, and when I hovered over "lo pongo" the first option is "I give it", but it was marked wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnHatchell

Here's the report I sent Duolingo: "In English "I put it" is a fragment that needs a location object to say where it's being put. "I put it down" would indicate I was just trying to get rid of it and didn't care where. If "Lo pongo" means something different please clarify."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deinanthe
Deinanthe
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It does sound strange by itself. But I would say "I put it over there." or "I put it on the table."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

It's not a proper English sentence. Is is a proper Spanish sentence? That's what I'd like to know.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdickson123

See Mr. Hazard's posts above. They are extremely helpful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
MrHazard
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I'm not a native speaker, but my dictionary says that "poner" is a transitive verb. That means it needs a prepositional phrase or the like to follow it. The nature of Duolingo's program dictates that the examples are non-contextual, but they should at least be complete.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

A transitive verb means that it needs a direct object, which in this case is it/lo. A transitive verb doesn't need a prepositional phrase.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
MrHazard
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Yes, of course, but as I have mentioned above, in English "put" must be accompanied by a definite place. You can't say, "I put a chair," you must say where you put it.

See the Oxford dictionary definition re the necessity for a specific place. This is not about the transitive nature of "put" but its actual definition. "Put" needs mention of a place. Doesn't matter whether it's a prepositional phrase, indirect noun or whatever—it just needs a place. I don't know how else to state this. I have put it. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Deinanthe- I come back to this sentence I agree that without a specified place the sentence is weak. I can't find any examples online of lo pongo. The other thought is that perhaps something is implied within the spanish language. We need a native speaker to advise us.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wardo1234

I saw one of the translations for poner is to be used to set the table. Thus this could be in context: Who normally sets the table? --- I set it (lo pongo).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mreaderclt
mreaderclt
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"I set it" was not accepted. Perhaps "poner" only means "to set" when used with "la mesa?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/e-z-duz-it

Since it is used in "to set" the table, can any native Spanish speakers tell me if it is used for "to set" in reference "to set" temperature or as in "to set" a lever, like a throttle lever? Poner - to put

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenGarman

exactly my question. I wrote "i set it" presuming it meant the table, as I've never ever said "i put it" as a sentence...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spencersloth
spencersloth
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Estoy de acuerdo que "poner" debe significar "to set" en este caso. Pero en tu ejemplo debes usar "la pongo" porque el sujeto es "la mesa" :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conradlovejoy

How about "Lo pongo allí" just so it doesn't sound like the speaker stopped before completing the sentence...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizablu
elizablu
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Should accept "I put it down," as that would be the idiomatic way to say this in English.

Or maybe they are talking about an options trader selling a put on a stock. Kidding.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LDuo1234

Hah

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mardi100

I didn't want to say "I put it" for all the reasons given, so I looked to see what other choices I had. "Give" was suggested, so I said, "I give it," but that was marked wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulZurin

I have a dictionary that gives pongo as "put on" I used "I put it on" and it was wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rachel_nm

Yes, "poner" can be used to say you put on an article of clothing. That should be correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Caveman lingo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kristanc

The first clue says 'give' is the translation; 'put' is a later translation - how do you know if it means 'give' or 'put/place'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

This sounds very strange in English.I know a case could be made, but to my ear weird.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RatInAMaze

"... but to my ear weird" is self-referential? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/13371453
13371453
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Could anyone please give an example when to use this sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoesVanBos
LoesVanBos
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The only place I can see this sentence used by itself is if it was to mean "I'll wear it. " As in - "¿Te vas a poner este vestido?" - "Si, lo pongo." I'm not sure if that's grammatically correct, but either I've heard it used that way or my memory is playing tricks on me. confused head scratching

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

I think poner as "wear" requires the reflexive pronoun. "Me lo pongo."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Toni-Jones

Duolingo should have finished the sentence to make it make since.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/objectively
objectively
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This sentence make sense in the context of finance involving options: puts and calls

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

If "Lo pongo" is I put it, then why was I counted wrong when I translated "Lo creo" as "I believe it" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxinedev

I never said "I put it", but I said many times "I put it there". This sentence is incomplete, and yes, it is weird. It would not be the first time on Duolingo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janpot
Janpot
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I tried "I put him" but it was marked wrong. Corrent or not?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/and.kelley.love

We say this in the Southwest lol.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kibod

annoying sentence and mouse over indicates pongo could be I put which was flagged wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tymoniasty

What about I give it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tamirsa
tamirsa
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I listened many times and it sounds like "pungo" and not "pongo". Since I somehow felt that "pungo" will be incorrect in Spanish (intuition), I was right to finally guess.

3 years ago