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"Durante todo el verano nos quedamos en la casa de ellos."

Translation:During the whole summer we stay at their house.

5 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sunnymeader

I translated the first part as "All summer long" which is less clunky than "During the whole summer". I think it should be accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lil_Tunechi

Also shouldn't "During all of summer" be the same thing as "During the whole summer" And I think you're right

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mec6132

I agree. I answered "During all the summer we stay in their house" and it was marked incorrect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMon385640

Me too.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aelise_627
Aelise_627
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I wrote "We stay at their house all summer" and it was accepted (June 2018)

Your translation is good too. It should be accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

why is the NOS necessary? Would the sentence read the same if it was just "...."quedamos en la casa de ellos? Ex. WE REMAIN THE THEIR HOUSE vs. WE REMAIN OURSELVES IN THER HOUSE

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/letter_s
letter_s
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I found this blog post that might help on when to use quedar and quedarse. Take a look here. http://mariaortegagarcia.com/spanish-blog/uses-of-quedar-quedarse/

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nmstuart
nmstuart
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I agree. Why do we need nos here

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/levelledout

Basically adding nos changes the meaning of quedamos from we have left over (etc) to we stay.

A more techincal definition is that the infinitive of reflexive verbs end in -se. So quedar (non-reflexive) means to have left over but quedarse (reflexive) means to stay. Both quedar and quedarse can be conjugated into quedamos. But in this case we want to translate stay so we need the reflexive version. Therefore we have to add the appropriate reflexive pronoun, nos.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nadya222
Nadya222
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You said this: "Both quedar and quedarse can be conjugated into quedamos."

I respectfully disagree:

The conjugations of reflexive verbs always include the reflexive pronouns, like this:

--QUEDARSE--

Me quedo
Te quedas
Se queda (referring to Usted, Él, and Ella), 3rd-person singular
Nos quedamos
Os quedáis (very infrequently used in all of Latin America)
Se quedan (3rd-person plural: you 'plural' and 'they')


An example of a "non-reflexive" sentence, using 'quedar', might include the following:

"Nos queda poco pan."
(Little bread remains, for us [to eat].)
(We have little bread left.)

"Queda mucha comida.
(A lot of food remains.)
(A lot of food is left over.)

NOTE: The English words "to eat" are in brackets, in the first example, because they are not part of the sentence...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lenorelambert

I've read the answers already posted to this question and I'm still not 100% clear on the answer. When you hover over 'quedamos' is says it means 'to stay' and when you look at the conjugation, it's a regularly conjugated verb. So by that reading, 'quedamos' means 'we stay' doesn't it? In which case, why do we need 'nos'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pat3019

Duolingo is very inconsistent in the answers it accepts sometimes it accepts answers with spelling mistakes yet sometimes when you translate the sentence correctly it says you're wrong on the basis that it is not exact. It can be very frustrating. And I hope they really fine tune it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcshruboak

I wrote "For the whole summer we stay at their house." It was not accepted. I think it should be. Reporting it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/letter_s
letter_s
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I translated it as "Throughout all the summer we stayed in their house" and it wasn't accepted. As todo was a new word, I looked at the clues and "all" was the only one that was given that would fit here. "Quedar" could be preterit tense. http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/quedar

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RGandhi78
RGandhi78
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My two cents:

"Throughout all" is redundant, and I've never heard the phrase uttered before. Usually I've heard "Throughout the summer." I have also heard "Throughout all summer," omitting the "the."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanO_O_O

All through the summer was rejected too

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tim_critt

"durante" does not always translate as during. in english, during does not tell you " how long", but rather "when". the translation with duringis therefore incorrect. source- im an English teacher living in Spain. this is a common "Spanglish" mistake.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nueby
nueby
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So how would you translate "durante todo el verano" to convey the when? I do not like "during" either, but my "for the whole summer" was rejected (28 July 2014).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crf.
crf.Plus
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I would use "For the whole summer"... but DL counted that wrong, so what do I know...

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkayda
kkayda
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I used "all during the summer we stayed at..." and it was also marked wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/delphiocean

I put "all during summer we stayed in their house" i can see how it was marked wrong because it doesnt sound right in english, but the message is the same.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/runninbear

all during the summer we stayed in their house.. what is wrong with that?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geyerlynda

On this side of the pond we say we stayed in (or at) their house all summer. Period. DL gets a big red X.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielDayot
GabrielDayot
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I think it's "stayed".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bamburm

I put "throughout the summer" but it was not accepted. Since anomalous jack had his accepted last month why shouldn't I ?????

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CiprianGraphics

''during all of the summer'' = ''during all summer''.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nadya222
Nadya222
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"during all summer"... (this is really 'stilted' English)

._.

I HAVE seen the following, years ago, in my native USA:

"The farmer's sons, during all of October, helped with the harvest."

(This was an uncommon way of phrasing it, though, even at that time...)

._.

The following is used in the 21st century:

"During the whole month of October, the farmer's boys helped with the harvest."
"During the entire month of October, the farmer's boys helped with the harvest."
"For the whole month of October, the boys labored with their dad to pull in the harvest."
"For the entire month of October, the boys labored with their dad to pull in the harvest."

"The entire month of October, the boys worked with their dad..."
"The whole month of October, the boys worked with their dad..."

The above examples are common where I come from.

. _ .

BY EXTRAPOLATION, then, the Spanish sentence can easily be the following:

"Durante todo el verano nos quedamos en la casa de ellos."
(We stay at their house for the whole summer.)
(We stay at their house all summer long.)
(We stay at their house all summer...)
(We stay 'in' their house all summer long.)
(We stay 'in' their house all summer.)
(We stayed * at their house the whole [time].)
(We stayed * at their house all summer long.)
(We stayed * at their house all summer.)
(We stayed 'in' their HOUSE all summer.)
(We stayed 'in' THEIR house all summer.)

We simply don't need the word "during", in English, in this case: it is just as good without it.

or (also)...

(The whole summer we stayed * at their house.)
(The entire summer we stayed * at their house.)
(All summer long, we stayed * at their house.)
ETC...

. _ .

NOTE: "Nos quedamos"* can be either present-tense or past-tense (because of the way the verb is conjugated).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CiprianGraphics

Thank you for your explanation. So basically simply saying ''we stayed at their house all summer'' is enough. I got confused, trying to translate word-by-word with ''durante'' and completely forgot that ''during'' is no longer necessary in these cases. A lingot from me! :)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

past tense "we stayed' also accepted

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jewpsy
Jewpsy
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why "we are staying" is not accepted?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nadya222
Nadya222
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"We're staying at their house all summer long."

Sounds good, to me!

P.S.: Sometimes, Duolingo accepts the "progressive present-tense" of some verb conjugations (like the verb "to go" [ir], for example, in similar instances. But, not always...)

"We will be staying at their house for the entire summer."
"We're staying at their house for the whole summer."

(The above two examples seem, to me, to be some good translations for the idea the Spanish sentence is trying to convey.)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icemule1

I put "Throughout the summer we stayed at their house." and it didn't accept. I think it's right. Reporting 7/9/18

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankFox0

"Throughout the summer" should be accepted.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nadya222
Nadya222
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I used the word "remain" (for the word 'stay').

EXAMPLE:

"Se quedarán 'Vds.' en la ciudad durante la temporada entera?"

(Will you 'remain' in the city for the entire season?)
ALTERNATIVE: ("Will you 'stay' in the city for the entire season?")
ANOTHER ALT: ("Will you be 'staying' in the city for the whole season?")
ALTERNATIVE #3: (Will you be staying in the city the whole [time]?)


NOTE: "Vds." is an older abbreviation for 'ustedes'. It comes from the Middle Ages and was originally a contraction for "Vuestras Mercedes"

example:

"Va 'Vuestra Merced' a la fiesta, Oh Rey?"

('Your Grace', are you going to the celebration, O King?)

. _ .

"'Vuestra Merced', va a la fiesta?
"'Vd.', va a la fiesta?"

('Your Grace', goeth thou to the feast celebration?)
('Your Grace', art thou going to the feast?)
('Your Grace', are you going to the feast?)

. _ .

And, then-- with the passage of time-- the phrase "Vuestra Merced" becomes just --'Vd.'--

"Vd., Oh Rey, piensa asistir a la fiesta?"
(Thou, O King, dost thou plan to attend the feast?)

('You', O King, do you plan on attending the feast?)

And "Vd." morphed into "Ud.", like this:

"Piensa 'Ud.' asistir a la fiesta, Señor?
(Do you plan to attend the feast, Sire*?)

Note, too, that 'sire'* was the regal (and proper) way of addressing the King.

And, as Paul Harvey used to say: "Now you know the REST OF the story..."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I think you're right, but Duo is a simple Owl and it seems that quedar is used for "remain" while "stay" seems to require the pronominal quedarse.

To be fair to Duo, I think "stay" is a better choice than "remain" in sentences like the one used in this drill. To be sure, an English speaker would know what you mean and wouldn't think it sounded odd in context, but Duo isn't quite so fluent. For instance, present tense of deber is usually translated as "must" and the conditional tense is usually translated with "should." Native English and Spanish speakers aren't nearly so rigid in their usage.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jill713026

The whole of the summer ?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shaun798350

I reported "During all of summer we stayed at their house"

2 weeks ago