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  5. "Do you have a minute?"

"Do you have a minute?"

Translation:Har du tid en minut?

December 31, 2014

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan-Olav

Quite common is also 'Har du tid ett par sekunder?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Metlieb

Multiple choise here. I only selected "har du en minut." Apparently, "Har ni tid en minut." should have been marked as well. What does the "tid" mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gizka

"Tid" means time, so in this case you're asked if you "have time a minute"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Metlieb

that sounds really odd :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sustained

My Swedish friend says that the solution with tid is not something that they have heard and that it is a weird construct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Really? har tid is extremely common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sustained

I see, thanks for letting me know. I think what they said was that "har du/ni tid en minut" seems strange to them but that they have heard "har du/ni tid" a fair bit? But they have a lot more exposure to (and are far better at) written over spoken Swedish so maybe that's why they haven't come across it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BerniedeVe

har du tid, can also be. are you free? aside from do you have time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will709432

What's the use of tid here? Is it really needed? Sounds like do you have time a minute??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sustained

It's just a set phrase, they often don't make any sense if you try to interpret them literally.

Like the English phrase "all of a sudden".

Let's look at it sort of analytically:

  1. What even is a (single) "sudden"?

  2. What does "all of" refer to, we only have one thing (a "sudden")?

  3. A "sudden" isn't even a thing!

TL;DR Set phrases don't have to make sense. It's just how it's said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

Do you a minute of time for me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jtree16

Can this be solved by using 'hinner' in stead of 'har tid'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

No, that doesn't really make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timis200

"Har du tid en minute?" - is it gramatically correct? Or should you consider this like a phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahiranta1

can I say: Har du en stund?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FireFoxi

I think "ni" is to polite, "du" is also appropriate, if speaking to a single individual. By the text alone, we do not know how many people we are addressing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Most people in Sweden do not use ni as a polite pronoun, only for plural. The short version is that its' OK to use ni as a polite pronoun in Finland (but not necessary), but risky in Sweden – some people do use it that way, but the number of people who dislike that usage is much bigger, and some people dislike it intensely. There's a more detailed thread about this that you can find via the sticky under Discussions.

du is always for singular of course.

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